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  5. "Er ist frei."

"Er ist frei."

Translation:He is free.

March 19, 2013

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColbyStein

Just to clarify for everyone who will read this in the future:

Frei = Freedom, Kostenlos = No monetary charge


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CareyFleetwood

I came here for this clarification, I didn't expect Duelingo to be referencing rentboys.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aswizzles

Kostenloss ~ costless


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markus314988

Kostenlos or kostenloss?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D4v3thund3r

That was confusing at first, as I didn't see any separation between the words "Freedom Kostenlos".

Reading it again, it would be more clear to include a semicolon:

Frei = Freedom; Kostenlos = No monetary charge

Thank you ColbyStein for this explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyaA2

May Allah bless you :))..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D928148

Very helpful thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PlatinumCR

Thank you very much! For a second right there I thought the program was talking about money.


[deactivated user]

    As a Ukrainian native speaker, I find it funny that this difference has to be pointed out in English every time in the comments. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natehog

    We have many words that sound the same or are even spelled the same. There their and they're even gives native english speakers trouble at times.

    Although the two meanings of "free" share the same general concept, so it is easy to see where they came from.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camilo316083

    Same here as Spanish native speaker haha


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liggliluff

    Does German have "gratis"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    Not sure— but even if it does, we can’t use that to talk about a person. I suppose if you were giving away free puppies in front of the Aldi, or something…


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Does German have "gratis"?

    Yes, it does.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slytherclaw

    Free as in freedom vs slavery? Free as in available (to ladies and whatnot)? I'm not sure what it means.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenkvist

    Freedom or being without restrictions, Free from work/school, unoccupied as in "Das Badezimmer ist frei", without cost, available for relationship.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirstinmjkeller

    Lenkvist is right. In German you have "freizeit" (free time), "freitag" (free day), etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maryblueberry

    I thought freitag was friday


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markus314988

    According to Google Translate, Freitag is Friday and freier Tag is free day


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gavc85

    free to drink beer?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jushmita

    like as in free to hangout and free of any commitments?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/germanwalrose3

    I dont think I will ever get a good score trying to hear the difference in er and ihr


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeltingPsychic

    You can sometimes work it out based on the form of the verb. For er ist frei it must be er because er ist frei but ihr seid frei.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Balamcat

    If it helps, "Ihr" sounds more like ear, while "Er" sounds more like air


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/destructoboy12

    OMG THERE SELLING FREE PEOPLE!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duopaida

    I thought frie is to fry my bad


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanDimi

    Same. I wrote "Er isst frei" and it accepted it, that confused me even further!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHarrell13

    This is because "isst" and "ist" are homophones. Duo is set to accept them incorrectly because of the listening exercises.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanover_Fiste

    Why wouldn't "He is open" work here? Open meaning "available".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/einefrau22

    Frei also means available, but the word "open" would not work as a good translation because being open and being available can mean different things.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicogutyskacore

    why "he is free" and not "it is free"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicogutyskacore

    but duo also translates it as it :/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanover_Fiste

    Hmm. I believe (I'm not a native speaker) that Er could be used as "it" when it is referring to a known masculine noun. Ich habe einen Speigel. Er ist kaputt. Although, when I ran my theory through google translate, it still spit out "Es ist kaputt." But I'm pretty sure you can use Er, Es, or Sie if it matches the object's gender.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CallMeAnja

    You are correct as long as the noun is named previously.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbryldztr

    100 prozent richtig 100 percent true :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/long13021997

    can you explain to me that the "r" sound is pronounced to be "g" in English or like what?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeltingPsychic

    The IPA for frei is fʁaɪ̯. The ʁ symbol indicates a voiced uvular fricative or "guttural R". I believe it's the same sound for r as used in French. The closest sound English has to this is probably g which is why you're hearing that.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosevonTexas

    Yes, the German 'R' is the same as the French. One way to learn to pronounce the guttural 'R' is to gargle. As children, to practise this sound we would pretend we were revving a car motor or flying a plane.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MillardXD

    I submitted "Der ist frei.", since that's what I thought I heard and it was considered. I came here to find that the correct answer is actually "Er ist frei.". I just want to know if both answers are correct or if it's just an error in Duolingo. I hope someone can enlighten me on this. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosevonTexas

    In a way your answer was correct. Often, to reference a male object native speakers will slangily use 'der' instead of 'er.' (Basically, they're using the article, but dropping the noun.) However, it's not quite grammatical.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Penderuxxekrieg

    Does this mean free as in available or free as in freedom?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenjaminMahony

    Same thing, free as in no obligations.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    No, that’s kostenlos.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessBardio

    Would this also hold the same meaning as "He is available"?

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