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"Now I am at the airport."

Translation:Ahora estoy en el aeropuerto.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sra.Iadanza

Im suprised that no one mentioned the simple fact the use of the preposition "a" is used to indicate travel toward some place or some thing. For example voy a... since you are already at the airport you cannot be travelling toward it and thus "a" is not the appropriate preposition to use in this case.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toadfoot

Ah!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jkomsky

Can you say "estoy al aeropuerto"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eltegid

No, estoy EN el aeropuerto. A would be translated as 'to' in this context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonpenguin888

When do you do estoy and when do you do soy?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eltegid

As a native it's very hard for me to answer that, actually. But you have pretty good answers if you scroll down (I'd just copy one of them but I think its better if you read at least two or three of them).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmanbrown

Why is it translated to "to"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eltegid

I go to the airport = voy al (a+el) aeropuerto Saying estoy al aeropuerto would be like saying 'I am to the airport'

Or, as sra.ladanz says above, "the use of the preposition "a" is used to indicate travel toward some place or some thing. "

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friendorphobia

Difference between Ahora and Ya? Don't both mean "now"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghalsing

Ya is "already" and ahora is "now"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Billhmjr

Ya is also "now"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eltegid

AGH, I wrote a VERY long message detailing the definitions and uses according to the 'official' Spanish dictionary (http://lema.rae.es/drae/) and accidentally deleted it. The summary is that 'ahora' is more closely translated as 'now', whereas 'ya' is similar 'already' in most cases, 'now' in some specific uses, and it also has a bunch of other translations that are not as important (it has 8 definitions, not all of them are covered by 'now' and 'already')

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrule
mrule
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Wiktionary says that ya and ahora are synonyms, so maybe Duo is wrong about this one? ( or Wiktionary is wrong, it happens )

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eltegid

They are partial synonyms. They do both mean now, but there is a nuance in meaning by which "ya" means already, at least in this context. An example in which they can be used interchangeably is, for instance: 'Clean your room now'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"Estar," not "Ser," is used when temporary conditions (such as mood) or the location of a person, place or thing is involved, according to my Spanish grammar book.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Good thinking although it is not quite that simple. You need to know DOCTOR PLACE:

Use ser for:
Description
Occupation
Characteristic
Time
Origin
Relationship

Use estar for:
Position
Location
Action
Condition
Emotion

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skirkk
skirkk
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What is the difference between 'soy' and 'estoy'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrickburk1988

I always found the Latin roots really helpful in remembering which form of "being" to use.

Ser comes from the Latin verb "esse", which is also the root for the word ESSENCE. So when assigning essential qualities to something (personality, appearance, color, material, etc.), use ser.

Estar, on the other hand, comes from Latin "stare", which is also the root word for STATUS. Consider a Facebook status, which you might change multiple times daily! Estar covers these temporary states and qualities that are liable to change (location, brief periods of emotion, etc.).


There are a few big exceptions you have to remember:

Estar covers current location! This applies even to things that are more or less permanent and immovable, like buildings. "The church is on the corner," would have to be "La iglesia está en la esquina," even though the church is probably never going to move.

And even though estar = location, when speaking about where something came from you must use ser. "I am from the U.S." would have to be "Soy de los EE. UU."

For whatever reason, the location of events always uses ser. "The party's at my house," must be "La fiesta es en mi casa." If you use "La fiesta está en mi casa," it sounds like you have a friend nicknamed "La Fiesta" who's visiting your home.

Despite time being constantly changing and transitory, you always use "ser" when speaking of it. "It's two o'clock" is always "Son los dos."

Even though things like personality traits, profession, religion, etc. can change, they tend NOT to. So even if you're only working a summer job as a lifeguard, you'd still say "Soy salvavidas."

You'd likely use estar to describe a current state that is a deviation from the "essential state", even if the change is permanent. Like say my car is completely totaled. I'd still say "Mi coche está roto" even though there's absolutely no chance of its state returning to "fixed".

And some words, especially those concerning personality, can change meaning depending on whether they're used with ser or estar. Ser implies a habitual, more-or-less permanent personality trait, and estar is a passing mood. For example: "La única cosa peor que ser aburrido es estar aburrido" The only thing worse than being boring is being bored.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

battertag: That would take a full two-semester college Spanish course. You could google it and get some answers or get a good Spanish grammar book. But here are a few basic differences: "soy" comes from the infinitive "ser". It is used for permanent characteristics like size, color, etc./////////"estoy" comes from the infinitive "estar". It is used for location and temporary characteristics like health cold, hot, dirty, clean, etc.///////////In this sentence it is "estoy" because it is talking about the LOCATION, that is, the airport.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skirkk
skirkk
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Thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conelson

Why is "ahora estoy en aeropuerto" incorrect? Why is the article "el" on "aeropuerto" necessary here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

I am at airport... ??? In this case, you say the even in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eltegid

In general, you don't use nouns (except for proper nouns) without an article, I think. I haven't thought hard about it though, and as a native I don't have these rules clearly outlined in my mind.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John_Payne

I heard a rhyme to help remember the difference between Ser and Estar. I will give the beginning, but cannot recall how the rest goes, but it is the other one:

"For how you feel and where you are, always use the verb Estar", for ? and ?and ? and ?, always use the other one"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/21leejusv

H

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

Why is "Estoy ahora en el aeropuerto" an incorrect translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Spanish is sometimes particular about word order.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NarutoUzumaki

the time has to come before the state i think

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaroninabowl

why not "a" for "at", or does "a" refer to "going at" or "going toward"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

"en" can mean "in", "at" or "on"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javad.noor

what about 'aqui estoy en el aeropuerto'? What's the difference between aqui and ahora?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

aquí = here//////////////////ahora = now/////////////// (I have seen other discussion comments that "aquí" could also mean "now", but in many years of study and living in Mexico, I have never heard or seen it used that way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

This site will be useful for you: http://www.spanishdict.com/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotSoClever

Why is "Ahora estoy en el aeropuerto" the correct answer? Wouldn't that mean "Now I am in the airport" rather than "Now I am at the airport"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Billhmjr

preposition: en = in, on, at, to, into, for, by, about. (It's their language and their rules for translation.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotSoClever

Thanks! I wasn't aware of all the definitions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toadfoot

Why not "a" rather than "en"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonMarkla

See Sra.ladanz's previous comment.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/subbidextro

Is "estoy" supposed to be used only for locations? !!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

My general rule of thumb is does it answer: Cómo estas? Or... Dónde estas? Then use estoy. Otherwise, it's probably soy.

Though I'm sure there's exceptions as with any rule.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evanbhenry
evanbhenry
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What about "por" in this situation? "Ahora estoy por el aeropuerto"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BulbousRumpus

You made it! I knew you could do it, Duo.

10 months ago