https://www.duolingo.com/yateanieys

Why I love learning Esperanto:

Saluton! :o)

I've attempted to learn several languages over the past couple decades, and Esperanto is the first language I've ever developed an emotional attachment to. I think the reason I love learning Esperanto so much is because it feels like an adventure to me. It's challenging as is any language, but learning Esperanto is fun, and I am discovering new things every day! Not only that, but I get to apply everything I've learned immediately without having to bear in mind a lexicon of rules and regulations as with other languages.

I'm still quite a newbie when it comes to speaking Esperanto (about 20 gilded skills in the tree at the moment), but I have thoroughly enjoyed my time thus far learning this wonderful language on Duolingo!


My wife and I are currently learning the language together. This morning, she mentioned needing deodorant. She didn't know the word for deodorant in Esperanto, so she smiled and said "desodorante" (Spanish). That prompted me to look up the word in Esperanto, which is senodorigilo.

As tedious as that word is to enunciate, here's what blows my mind: even though I'm not quite a full month into learning the language, I was able to use what I've learned from Duolingo lessons and this discussion forum to break apart the word and gain a full understanding of its literal translation without looking anything up (apart from the word senodorigilo itself).

sen odoro = "without odor"

-igi = suffix that means "to make", e.g. simpligi, which means "to simplify" (literally, "to make simple")

-ilo = suffix that means "tool", e.g. skribilo, which literally means "writing tool"

So, senodorigilo literally translates to "a tool used to make [someone/something] without odor." In fact, one might even say that senodorigilo estas ilo por igi sen odoro, which roughly translates to "deodorant is a tool to make without odor."

I'm sure that there are caveats with Esperanto (maybe even several in this very post lol), but as far as I've learned, there aren't many (if there are even any) exceptions to any rule with the language.

Making progress with learning any language is rewarding, but making this kind of progress in less than a month of starting makes learning Esperanto fun, which is a first for me with learning a new language.

This is why I love Esperanto!

~Bonan aventuron, miaj amikoj!

10 months ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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And the positive hits keep coming! I mean there are exceptions to some rrules, and a few apparent inconsistencies that can trip you up, but compared to other languages its many many orders of magnitude fewer. And it is like playing a video game with a self reinforcing reward system that beeps when you get something right or deduce a meaning from first principles. The language itself rewards you for playfulness and inginuity, it feels like a language for scientists and engineers - well designed building blocks that fit together in endless useful ways. Almost 2 years in and still loving it!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cambarellus
Cambarellus
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I'm just glad there is no ridiculous gender on any nouns. Seriously, I started German when young because I have German relatives, took it in school... 20 odd years later I'm trying to relearn it. I hate it... all that Der, Die, Das, Ein, Eine, Einen nonsense. :D

I'm persevering because I really want to speak it; but I feel I will never master German because I will never master gendered nouns.

A month of Esperanto and I'm fairly confident I will be relatively fluent by the end of the year. I love Esperanto. It's fun to use. It's logical. It makes sense.

Once I've completed the tree here in Esperanto (should be this Summer), I'm going to start learning Spanish too because I feel it's a necessary language to know in the US.

After that... never again will I attempt a language with noun genders. I don't know why it's so hard for me to grasp. On a good day I can learn and retain 50 new words in a day- but I can't learn 10 with gender... :p

Anyhow, thank you Mr. Zamenhof for your wisdom those many years ago for excluding gender. (and everything else you got right)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenCollins0

When I was a student in Germany, I got sick and my doctor was an Israeli medical student. He got the genders of the nouns all wrong, and if I had not been sick, it would’ve been hilarious. However, it was very easy to understand him. Just persevere, mess up the genders are you like,, and they will eventually come to you. Do not learn “man is Mann.“ instead learn “man is der Mann, die Männer” and it will be much, much easier.

Unlike Spanish, Italian, and French, German has no gender in the plural, so console yourself with that!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cambarellus
Cambarellus
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Thank you, yes. I'm going to stick with it. I want to be able to speak proper German with the German side of my family when I see them. I don't know why the gender is so hard for me.

I do wonder how often children learning the language get the wrong gender when young, if a teacher has to correct gender on writing assignments often, or if it's just a mindset that comes naturally if you're raised with it.

I do find Esperanto much easier though. Interestingly, I feel the confidence I get from getting Esperanto right is making me stick with the German. I come back for the Esperanto because it easier and whilst I'm here I brush up on my German.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiegoBenav5

Saluton amiko!

I got the same feeling with Esperanto!

I am a native Spanish speaker and I also managed to learn English. In the past I learned some French for about a couple of years, but did not have much luck there. And later tried German for about 2 years as well and I got to a point where I could not understand many of the things and eventually got frustrated and abandoned it.

I have being using Doulingo for Esperanto for about 3 weeks and it feels so good to realize I am making such a good progress in such little amount of time. I wish many other people could realize how easy and rewarding Esperanto could be. Learning Esperanto is so much fun!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jal
jalPlus
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Mi esperas ke vi daŭru ĝui lerni Esperanton!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/purplewater

Awesome, I love it too. I was having conversations with esperantists after 5 months of duolingo study.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yateanieys

Mojose!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorFingleton

Unu el ni, unu el ni

Glu-glu-glu, glu-glu-glu

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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The word for deodorant that I came up with years ago (and still use) is desodoraĵo. I don't remember whether I coined it or learned it from somewhere. I would say that desodoraĵo is one possible kind of senodorigilo. If you came to my house, though, and asked where you can buy senodorigilo in town, I'd send you to the drug store or supermarket.

9 months ago
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