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  5. "You stand in front of me."

"You stand in front of me."

Translation:Du stehst vor mir.

February 11, 2018

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/selteneauster

Lokale Präpositionen:

Source: easy-deutsch.de


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwalek

That is brilliant, have a lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie401510

That is great, thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariella747

Why mir not mich?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Vor" requires the dative after it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Eh? Stell dich vor mich.

It can take dative or accusative, depending on whether it’s expressing location or destination of motion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwalek

Any way 'vorne' could pass here? [What's the difference between vor and vorne]. Vielen Dank im voraus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Any way 'vorne' could pass here?

No.

[What's the difference between vor and vorne]

vor is a preposition; it comes before a noun. vor dem Mann = before the man, in front of the man

vorne is an adverb; it stands alone. vorne = at the front. (Note: not "at the front of".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwalek

Well explained, as usual. Danke Mizinamo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SUN_MAC

Please translate: "Why you always stand in front me?"

Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MortiBiRD

Wieso stehst du immer vor mir?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

The English should be "Why do you always stand in front of me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vegan20

Why ( stehen Sie vor mir) is wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

German always puts verbs in the second position of a sentence (for declarative sentences, at least). So that sentence should be "Sie stehen vor mir."

Your sentence is phrased like a question, where the verb does go first ("Are you standing in front of me?").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mintola410

Is it possible to say "vor mir stehst du" or does the order matter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is it possible to say "vor mir stehst du"

Grammatically possible, yes; the emphasis will be different.

Your order might be used to answer the question "And who is standing in front of me? -- Oh: it's you who is standing in front of me."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretMcMullan

Could this not also be imperative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

No, it couldn't. That would use a different verb form and not include "du": "Steh vor mir."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diego187554

Could I use "Du stehst gegenuber von mir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Could I use "Du stehst gegenuber von mir"?

gegenüber (note ü!) is "opposite", not "in front".

(If you can't make an ü, write ue, as in gegenueber.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris930725

Obsessed with the familiar again. Why not Sie stehen vor mir?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why not Sie stehen vor mir?

That's also possible, and accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bertil541549

I interpreted this as a command, so I wrote "Stehen Sie vor mir." Would that be the correct way to write it as a command?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I interpreted this as a command, so I wrote "Stehen Sie vor mir." Would that be the correct way to write it as a command?

Yes... sort of.

It's grammatically correct but it sounds very odd to me, because stehen is not really an action that you can perform someone to do.

I would say Stellen Sie sich vor mich. for "Stand in front of me" -- using sich stellen (place oneself) to indicate movement.

Similarly with Setzen Sie sich neben mich. (Sit down next to me) for "Sit next to me" and Legen Sie sich bitte hier hin. (Lie down here, please) for "Lie here, please" -- always with the "move to a standing/sitting/lying position" verbs rather than the "be in a standing/sitting/lying position" verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bertil541549

Vielen Dank! There is a lot to unpack in your answer, but you have given me a good start. Akkusativ, natürlich!

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