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"Escribe tu nombre."

Translation:Write your name.

2
5 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ajnsit

Why is "You write your name" not correct?

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjdps
Sjdps
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Because this is an imperative sentence. "You write your name" = "Tú escribes tu nombre" or "Usted escribe su nombre".

21
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bpaquette

What is the indication that it's imperative?

8
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

That's a good question. "Escribe" is the imperative form of "escribir", but it is also the Usted/El/Ella form.

You can rule out Usted as an option, because you don't use Usted and Tu forms in the same sentence, so "You write your name" is not a valid translation.

However "He/she writes your name" are valid translations (but I don't know whether DuoLingo recognises them).

46
Reply45 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BraddBurningham

Yep. "He writes your name" works.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
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Now they accept it/he/she writes. Why can they not use the nice ¡ ! around commands?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elysdir

Duolingo gives "Write your name" as another valid translation. Is that accurate?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Yes, "Escribe" is the imperative form for "tu".

3
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zenzic

I thought imperative was "escriba".

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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"escriba" is the formal imperative and "escribe" is the informal impreative

15
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zenzic

Thank you. I didn't realize there was an informal imperative.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"For most verbs (regular and irregular) the affirmative form of the familiar tú command is the same as the él form of the present tense. Familiar command endings are: -a for -ar berbs; -e for -er and -ir verbs." Por ejemplo ¡Saca una foto del museo¡ ¡Lee el libro de español! ¡Pide una CocaCola par mí también!

6
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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No, 'que yo escriba' is present of subjunctive, not imperative ;-)

-2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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The imperative form only has two persons:

  • 2ª sg. ¡Escribe tú! (¡Escribe!)
  • 2ª pl. ¡Escribid vosotros! (¡Escribid!)

You use the imperative to give a direct command, and you only can do it to a second person, singular or plural.

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

There are actually 5 affirmative forms (and 5 negative forms) for the imperative. For the verb "escribir": (tú) escribe; (Ud.) escriba; (nosotros) escribamos; (vosotros) escribid; (Uds.) escriban.

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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En la 4ª advertencia a los "Modelos de conjugación verbal" la RAE indica en el Panhispánico:

Por otro lado, se puede leer en el apartado 42.2.1 "El imperativo. Sus propiedades formales" de la Nueva gramática de la lengua española. Manual:

"... Desde el punto de vista morfológico, este se caracteriza por presentar un paradigma defectivo constituido fundadamente por formas de segunda persona. Así, por ejemplo, el imperativo del verbo venir consta de las siguientes formas:

SINGULAR: ven ~ vení (en las zonas voseantes), venga (usted). PLURAL: venid (usada en parte de España, vengan (ustedes), vengamos"

En las tablas en 4.9 de la misma obra, sólo aparecen dos formas para el imperativo. Etc, etc.

Como todo en una lengua es algo más complicado que uno y uno son dos, pero las formas exclusivas del modo imperativo son las de segunda persona.

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

¡Tiene razón¡, Highways. The various forms of "you" (tú, Ud., vosotros/as, Uds.) are the most common forms of the imperative. When I first learned this tense, I was surprised to learn that there is also a "nosotros" form. It is a command to a group of which "you" are a member, it uses the 1st person plural subjunctive form, and it is translated as "Let's." Although it is probably more common (and easier) to use "Vamos a" + infinitive to express this, the nosotros imperative form does exist and is listed in all conjugation books and sites. However, "¡Vámonos!" is the only word in this tense that I can recall ever having heard in speech.

http://www.123teachme.com/spanish_verb_conjugation/escribir http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/91 http://www.cliffsnotes.com/foreign-languages/spanish/spanish-ii/the-imperative/nosotros-lets-commands

-1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lichlord

Don't forget "vos escribí", the other second person singular.

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Glad you mentioned that, lichlord. I'm not familiar with the "vos" forms and Duo doesn't teach them. Do you know a good reference to learn about them?

-1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Anyone else mess up and put write your number?

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizzieBoth
LizzieBoth
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For some reason I also confuse the two, or used to at first. But if you look at the two pairs (nombre/name and numero/number), it's clear that numero can mean only one thing.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HennessyKing

Yup

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MercilessM

I actually wrote my name lol

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HennessyKing

Yea

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin_Emily_
Erin_Emily_
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I wrote -apple bloom- but put me wrong. I do not understand, he says "write your name"... u.u

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rrlear
rrlear
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Maybe you left out the "_" character? Keep trying with that - I'm sure it'll eventually work.

-3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeutschJeff

Duolingo needs to create a lesson that addresses the informal imperative commands before adding them into lessons so that people are less likely to get it wrong and not understand why because it has not been taught.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tnmcleod

wouldn't this be"escribas tu nombre" ?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

It's "escribe" because it's imperative. http://www.lingolex.com/swom/wom-imperative.htm

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

This link is helpful but this seems so complicated! So an imperative means a command? And you don't use the "normal" verb rules? I, too, would have used "escribas" but what I get from this is that in a command you use the he/she form when you are saying a command to someone?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

Yes, imperatives are commands. And yes, Spanish conjugation is definitely more complicated than English, but at the same time English conjugation is a lot more complicated than we realize because it comes naturally to us now.

Think of all of these: write your name; you write your name; you wrote your name; you would have written your name; you had written your name; you will have written your name; etc. We use the verb a little differently in each of these cases, and so does Spanish: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/escribir

Like you, I also tend to think of the second person singular imperative being the same as the third person singular present indicative (present indicative is the "normal" conjugation we learn first in Spanish), but that's not always the case since some verbs are irregular. For example "you say your name" is "dices tu nombre", but "say your name" is "di tu nombre". http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/irregtucomm.htm

To complicate all of this further is the fact that negative commands are also different, though spanishdict doesn't seem to list them in conjugations for some reason. For example "don't say your name" would not be "no di tu nombre", but rather "no digas tu nombre". http://spanish.about.com/od/verbmoods/a/negative_commands.htm

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Thank you! This really helps!!!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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The reason for not list "no digas tu nombre" as imperative is that it is a form of subjunctive, used as a command.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trunketti

I too was thinking the same.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

The problem is that the imperative forms were not given in the explanation area.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty325699
Dusty325699
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Interesting to be going into imperatives this early - not that I am complaining... I like the subtle new things

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miguel_Cerdo21

I put a letter at the end by mistake so frusterating

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hubare

Is spell not the same as write? Would "spell your name" not be correct?

-1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

The verb "to spell" is "deletrear". I remember it because of its similarity to "letra" (letter). I.e. spelling is the process of breaking a word down into letters.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

It's not the same. You can say the letters of your name out loud and you'd be spelling it but not writing it.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hubare

I just thought because "how do you spell...?" is "comó se escribe...?"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

I don't know that phrase, so maybe it is possible then. I just know the usual translation for escribir is write.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeadowlarkJ
MeadowlarkJ
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"Como se escribe...." is "how do you write..." but some people might use it to ask how to spell a word.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"¿Cómo deletrea su nombre?" = How do you spell your name?

0
Reply3 years ago