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"I have a zero in English."

Translation:Yo tengo un cero en inglés.

7 months ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rosa392508

This sentence means i have a zero percent on English class.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

I think it means, "I have a zero grade in English." In other words, the dude flunked.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ms.Whiskers

They should specify that they're talking about english class

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J-Dawg58195

I have a zero in ENGLISH. What else would they be talking about, english muffins? Or wait, does the government track all of our conversations and grade us?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirm12

Obviously. London is the surveillance capital of the world.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

It is.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Qyt9urzu

Well, how should I know how the American grading system works. I always thought your grades are letters (A-F) and I never heard about anyone getting a zero. The sentence could easily be changed to 'I have a zero in English class' which gives some context.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirm12

Not sure why you were downvoted. I agree, the sentence could be phrased better.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo
ekihoo
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So,so, so... You'd better start with it!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune_3
kitsune_3
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Is that a euphemism?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P-Code
P-Code
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None that I know of. All it means is that the speaker is failing English class....very badly.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirm12

What does this even mean in English? If it's to do with grades, 'I failed', 'I received a 'zero' ' or even 'I got zero (in an exam)' would all be better.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElderRasmu5

Can one use "sacar" in place of "tener" in this context? Since "sacar buenas/malas notas" is one way of saying "getting good/bad grades".

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rick.gomez

Why is "uno" wrong?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Holsen4
Holsen4
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Haha this has never happened to me.

1 month ago