https://www.duolingo.com/ndroock1

What am I missing?

I just started the Chinese from English course. What I miss is basically a list like: - chinese character; - pinying; - meaning ( in the course sofar ). Now, characters are introduced without explaining their meaning. This can't be right.

February 18, 2018

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kia264704

In mandarin (chinese), there is mot really any english equivelent to most word so you pick up the meaning by seeing how it is used in the sentence.

February 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Woof.

They do explain their meaning, just later in the lesson.

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Luciano490662

It is not right. I started learning mandarin since it was released, ive done many lessons and it had the meaning of all characters but I stopped for a few weeks. I came back today and it's not showing the meaning of the chinese characters... O_O Idk maybe its a bug.

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/simplenothing

I initially thought the same thing. But I think it works. By learning the characters in sentences, your brain kind of figures it out. Although, I admit it's helpful to have both resources. In my opinion, memrise.com is a good supplement to Duolingo's Chinese.

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SylviaRoque

This is my 1st contact with Chinese language, it's not easy for me. I'm using many parallel resources like Yabla dictionary, Purple Culture pinyin converter, tinycards... and also memrise. Fortunately we aren't learning strokes, hehe, it's already hard enough :-)

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Philip812402

I agree that this aspect of Duolingo Chinese is unsatisfactory. It's true that the translation exercises (Chinese to L1) give you the opportunity to see the Chinese words in context and deduce meaning and usage, which is quite good as a learning strategy, but I find my memory doesn't really cope with this. Partly, I feel this is because the presentation and use of characters is not systematic enough. We need: character presentation (hanzi + pinyin + pronunciation) > word presentation (most Mandarin words consist of two characters/syllables) > Chinese sentence presentation (= work out the meaning in L1) > translation of L1 into Chinese. Then repeat! And repeat! Sometimes the exercise requires, at an early stage, an English sentence to be translated into Chinese via selection of character/words, when there has been no presentation at all of the meaning of the Chinese, one has no guide to the syntax and there's no pop-up translation available. That simply generates error with no positive outcome. Crazy!

February 24, 2018
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