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"Vamos derecho en esta calle."

Translation:We go straight on this street.

7 months ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/IloveNorm
IloveNorm
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When dud "derecho" become straight instead of right

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetroWestJP
MetroWestJP
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"Derecho" is straight (ahead). "A la derecha" is (to the) right. When someone wants to emphasize that something is straight and not to the right, you may hear them say it twice, "derecho derecho".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adailek
Adailek
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Thank you for the clarification. I was also confused.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nobody610685

Genius calling straight and right almost the same word, confusion abounds.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Terri778680

Genius saying "We go left, right?" Stop mocking other countries, you're no better.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sprkr
sprkr
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Derecho is right as in correct or legal rights, which apparently can also mean straight. Derecha is right as opppsed to left.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TyroneB2
TyroneB2
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That's interesting because in my country we use "right" to also mean straight. When used it emphasizes not to turn at all. Example "go right down this street" We also use it to mean immediately. For example: "Stop right here".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilCohen1

Derecha ~right. Derecho straight

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Not exactly. Derecha and Derecho both mean "right" when used as adjectives. There still must be agreement between nouns and modifying adjectives. A masculine noun requires a masculine or neutral adjective. As in "my right foot"= mi pie derecho". When using "derecho" as an adverb, THEN it means "straight ahead".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vereschagin
Vereschagin
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Why can't this be read as being in the imperative? "Let's go straight on this street."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

It can.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

why not "let's go straight on this road" ?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

If you want to be a stickler though, "Let's go" is more accurately translated to "VĂ¡manos".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelrathfon

Why not "are going"? In numerous instances, Duo translates the present tense as progressive with -ing-.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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"are going" is accepted as of June 2018.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillaume484447

It was not accepted in my answer on July 24th

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeresaTalk3

"Go straight on this street" should have been accepted

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisDavie19

I was taught todo recto was straight on. Is this wrong?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

Maybe you go on the street, but you live, play, drive, walk IN the street. When you are ON the street, you're down and out!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolin_o
carolin_o
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IN this street.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Philg42
Philg42
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UK English is better if you say go straight along this street, or straight on along this street. Otherwise it could mean we aren't criminals on this street. I kid you not.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh414399

Love the humour of it! I've given you an Lingot!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I can verify that Phil. Mind you, there are a couple of interpretations of this sentence. Don't want to speak too loud in case I set one of our commenters off (clue: just above your comment). Hope I don't get into trouble now, feeling mischievous tonight. Or possibly nobody knows what the heck I am going on about.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adailek
Adailek
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Haha! American English also has that idiom. :D

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DestinyHog2
DestinyHog2
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Google translate said, We go right on this street. Which means "We go straight on this street." Remove it from google translate.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma0044
norma0044
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hi there, I was under the impression that "straight on" was recto. Am I wrong?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

You are not wrong. "Recto" means straight. One can also use "adelante".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidFarr5

"we go straight on in this street"surely makes more sense than straight on on this street?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tianara1

What a confusing concept!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keith3254

Er... shouldn't that be directo?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenny238146

I thought todo recto was straight or is derecho different to derecha?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SPanya4
SPanya4
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Does 'straight' mean 'straight on'? In Spain, I've heard 'todo recto' for this direction, not 'derecho'.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger654478

We go right on on this street, how about that?

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisScafe
ChrisScafe
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I put, "Let's go straight on this street," which I think is a perfectly cromulent translation. Marked wrong, but reported it.

1 day ago