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  5. "Vamos derecho en esta calle."

"Vamos derecho en esta calle."

Translation:We go straight on this street.

February 20, 2018

80 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IloveNorm

When dud "derecho" become straight instead of right

February 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetroWestJP

"Derecho" is straight (ahead). "A la derecha" is (to the) right. When someone wants to emphasize that something is straight and not to the right, you may hear them say it twice, "derecho derecho".

March 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CountessOfOle

Thank you for the clarification. I was also confused.

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nbruns
  • 1375

I'm sure "derecho, derecho" twice is best used when someone is turning right, because the person giving directions said "derecho", which is way too close to "derecha". I forgive almost every quirk I run into when learning Spanish. This one, however, is just plain dumb. The context and pronunciation is nearly the exact same for two critical, frequent words that mean entirely different things. The Real Academy dropped the ball, on this one. It's like if "paras" meant "stop" and "paros" meant go-real-fast.

May 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RepoMeister

If you turn RIGHT, you'll be LEFT (behind) but if you turn LEFT, you'll be RIGHT (correct). Languages all have issues.

August 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

Thank you, MetroWest. Your comment may be the only one that mentions "straight ahead." But, Duo accepts "We go straight ahead on this street." 16 Feb 2019

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PanMakser

thanks, that make so much sense now

July 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brett939659

Hm, never heard that. Not to say your wrong, just haven't hesrd of that.

June 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i_am_aritra
May 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sprkr

Derecho is right as in correct or legal rights, which apparently can also mean straight. Derecha is right as opppsed to left.

March 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcella628011

Also...derecho: straight, honest; (have a)right; del ~:on the right side; derechos de autor: royalties; ~s humanos: human rights; no hay ~: it's not fair(right); tener ~ a: have a right to.....

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarkAllen

Yours is the clarification that was required here. Thank you.

January 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DHammer12

That's interesting because in my country we use "right" to also mean straight. When used it emphasizes not to turn at all. Example "go right down this street" We also use it to mean immediately. For example: "Stop right here".

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GborHegeds1

which language?

October 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardCro901145

That´s English.

September 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fumar4

Instead of just starting a lesson. It is beneficial to click on the light bulb in the drop down options . That's where Duo will cover the content you are about to learn. The difference between Derecha/Derecho was covered in detail. Sometimes it is nice to just start without knowing other times its nice to know before you start.

May 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieVdU

Wow - never knew that. I just read people's comments to help me with the learning!! Often great fun.

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fumar4

Indeed it is and down the rabbit hole we go .

June 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tishgab

You are correct. in european spanish, it's the right.

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmilCohen1

Derecha ~right. Derecho straight

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

Not exactly. Derecha and Derecho both mean "right" when used as adjectives. There still must be agreement between nouns and modifying adjectives. A masculine noun requires a masculine or neutral adjective. As in "my right foot"= mi pie derecho". When using "derecho" as an adverb, THEN it means "straight ahead".

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelrathfon

Why not "are going"? In numerous instances, Duo translates the present tense as progressive with -ing-.

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

"are going" is accepted as of June 2018.

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillaume484447

It was not accepted in my answer on July 24th

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ewout446059

Not for me either one year later (26-06-2019)

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vereschagin

Why can't this be read as being in the imperative? "Let's go straight on this street."

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoredWithDuoNow

It can.

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fedor-A-learner

why not "let's go straight on this road" ?

July 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

If you want to be a stickler though, "Let's go" is more accurately translated to "Vámanos".

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FerEtayoRguez

I think you mean "Vayamos", which is the true imperative. Or maybe "Vámonos", the pronominal form ("vamos" + "nos"), which coequally is more equivalent to "Let's leave".

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Street=calle, road=carretera

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philg42

UK English is better if you say go straight along this street, or straight on along this street. Otherwise it could mean we aren't criminals on this street. I kid you not.

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hjh414399

Love the humour of it! I've given you an Lingot!

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CountessOfOle

Haha! American English also has that idiom. :D

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

I can verify that Phil. Mind you, there are a couple of interpretations of this sentence. Don't want to speak too loud in case I set one of our commenters off (clue: just above your comment). Hope I don't get into trouble now, feeling mischievous tonight. Or possibly nobody knows what the heck I am going on about.

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisDavie19

I was taught todo recto was straight on. Is this wrong?

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymondElFuego

It is also correct.

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaTalk3

"Go straight on this street" should have been accepted

July 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

That leaves out "we", which is part of the sentence.

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ekihoo

Maybe you go on the street, but you live, play, drive, walk IN the street. When you are ON the street, you're down and out!

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

I think the idiom, at least in British English, is 'on the streetS', ie plural.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tianara1

What a confusing concept!

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyHog2

Google translate said, We go right on this street. Which means "We go straight on this street." Remove it from google translate.

August 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norma0044

hi there, I was under the impression that "straight on" was recto. Am I wrong?

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

You are not wrong. "Recto" means straight. One can also use "adelante".

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidFarr5

"we go straight on in this street"surely makes more sense than straight on on this street?

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

"On in" sounds funny to me.

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gez70

Still not accepted

April 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keith3254

Er... shouldn't that be directo?

September 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenny238146

I thought todo recto was straight or is derecho different to derecha?

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvrslps

Recto and derecho are synonymous. Derecha means right. If you need help remembering just think Izquierda and derecha both end in a. Recto y derecho end in o.

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SPanya4

Does 'straight' mean 'straight on'? In Spain, I've heard 'todo recto' for this direction, not 'derecho'.

September 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger654478

We go right on on this street, how about that?

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisScafe

I put, "Let's go straight on this street," which I think is a perfectly cromulent translation. Marked wrong, but reported it.

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/molly756411

At this street?

September 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YvonneNorr1

I thought that todo recto was used to say straight?

October 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

This has already been asked, several times, but yes, that's also correct.

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ladyjoyous

We "are going" was not accepted October 2018!!

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calebtiv

Spanishdict says that the adjective straight when referring to a road is "recto".

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathy979841

Why cant it be in this street as well

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason463529

Derecha y derecho es un poco confuso. Pero entiendo la diferencia

January 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RenKaiser0

"we go straight on in this street", "we go straight on along this street". DL's translation sounds a bit awkward to my ears (but my English lessons were more than fifty years ago).

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wenhama

Straight on it should be and vary with staight on in this street

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldAlas

What does this English sentence mean, if not equivalent to "We go straight along this street"?

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

Donald, you have commented several times that "go straight along" should be accepted and I don't see why it shouldn't. Have you reported it?

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoBJ

Oops, missed that one. Derecho = straight, derecha = right.

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trumaine7

It gave 3 portions to choose from "we go, should we go, we'll go" i was wrong from the first word lol

March 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tawnya877527

Question: What indicators tell me which meaning of "derecha", which means right or straight, is correct? Up to this point "derecha" meant right, as in direction to turn. Now it means straight. So when I translate this sentence to read, "We should go right on this street." It is incorrect.

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Derecha=right, Derecho=straight

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tawnya877527

Yes, thank you. I read the comments after I commented. Lol

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jim392001

Seems to me that dl doesnt listen very well

May 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gail528673

This English translation I’d driving me mad! Here I am walking IN the street not ON it.

July 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lnate1

we are going straight into this street

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klothkat

We go straight up this street, is not accepted but ought to be

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NormaJenck

WE go right on this street,

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Right=derecha, straight=derecho

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NormaJenck

wow the sounds are so close and I would get confused. Thanks for the clarification

March 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolin_o

IN this street.

July 17, 2018
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