"Hoyesundíabello."

Translation:Today is a pretty day.

10 months ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gearloose55

I said "It's a beautiful day today" and it was not accepted; I think this should be accepted. Any comments?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillKinnai
BillKinnai
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Na, it should be. Report it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Platospicantes

It's a loose translation, but obviously carries the same meaning.

They try to accept as literal translation as possible. Accepting all loose translations opens up alternatives to the hundreds at times.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

DL accepts 'today is a beautiful day '. Anyone any idea what a 'pretty day' is? Sounds really weird.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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It's another way of saying a beautiful day. Some people say it that way. You honestly can't tell me you can't pull meaning from "pretty day".

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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Page 162 of the New American Supplement of The Encyclopædia Britannica bemoans,

Among Southerners pretty is a word very often misused; for instance, "Isn't this a pretty day?" and this error is a very general one. North Carolinians say the scenery is "pretty,"---meaning picturesque; the day is "pretty,"---meaning fine; and that a person's manners are "pretty,"---meaning well-bred.

Apparently the error is so very general, it can only be criticized, not explained. https://books.google.com/books?id=H-0hAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA162

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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I'm not sure how it could be considered an error. Pretty is an adjective. People use it to describe days. Even if others would use the beautiful (a synonym) how does that invalidate the word choice of others?

At one point, awful and awesome had nearly identical meanings. Over time, the meaning of awful shifted. We would be ridiculous to insist that awful should still mean "full of awe". Words change.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanhNhnNg15

Can sb tell me the different between bello and bonito ?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RChandrasekar

"pretty day" sounds odd. Wonderful day, great day, etc. may be better

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugggg
Dugggg
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It's pretty interesting that so many non-Americans have an issue with phrase pretty day. Because it sounds pretty natural to us!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertBRipley

That's because the British speak English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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So do Americans. :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

I think John Cleese had the final word on that one.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

I also said "It's a beautiful day today" and it was not accepted - I have reported it. 26/12/18

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nita-nits

With all the fighting in the world, can you please just agree to disagree here and just accept being corrected and get on with it! PLEASE!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHamp

Bello/bella is "pretty", but it can also be "beautiful." Your point is that few English-speaking people would say that a day is "pretty." They would say it's beautiful, or it's pretty nice, but not pretty.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pets_r_cool

It's probably not as common as "It's a beautiful day." but it's still prevalent.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertBRipley

I suggest a better translation is 'Today is a nice day' Shop assistants are fired if they don't tell you to "Have a nice day." They don't say 'Have a pretty day.'

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Platospicantes

But we don't have the context of a conversation with a shop assistant. Your sentence is also valid, but it's a stretch to say it's better without context.

And where do you live that shop assistants are fired for that? Yikes! :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertBRipley

Australia. They have 'random shoppers' who report back to the employer.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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RobertBRipley. I worked in and trained people for the tourism and hospitality industry for more than twenty five years and had never heard or seen this. Perhaps certain employers use this but it seems rather draconian and I would guess very rare.

2 weeks ago
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