https://www.duolingo.com/Mirson8

A short list of some Polish slang words

I made a short list of some Polish slang words. There is definitely more of these, but I put here the ones that are probably most popular. These are words that you wouldn't want to say to your boss or elderly people, but are fine in environment of friends and buddies.

Siema; - Hello; hi

Spoko - Ok; Don't worry; Fine

Ziomek - mate; buddy; guy (male)

ale beka - what a funny situation

(ale) ściema - (what a) lie/fraud/hoax

Czaić - To understand ; Czaisz? - Do you get it?

Kasa; hajs - cash

Ogarniać - To understand, to be in control of the situation.

Nie ogarniać - To not understand; To be lost in the situation.

Obczaj to - Check it out; look at that.

Suchar - Not very funy joke or not funny at all.

Wymiatać - To be the best; to show amazing skills.

melanż - a party (with a lot of alcohol)

I could make another list of moderately vulgar slang words, but I don't know if you would like it, and if it is against Duolingo guidelines.

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Okcydent
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Ziomek - aside of slang it used (nowadays rarely) to denote a man from the same country, land or area. Slang shortened ziomek to ziom, but also created a diminutive: ziomeczek.

Ogarniać - to understand, to be able to handle the situation. A person who does indeed ogarniać is ogar (same as hound, bloodhound), and one who doesn't is nieogar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirson8

I agree with that slang words "ogar" and "nieogar" comes from "ogarniać", but it seems that your translation of "ogar" as "hound" and "bloodhound" in this context is incorrect. It seams that "ogar" is also a kind of hunting dog in polish. https://sjp.pwn.pl/szukaj/ogar.html

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Okcydent
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I meant that the term „ogar”, traditionally - a hound, now means also someone who is very competent, rather intelligent.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirson8

oh, i misunderstood you :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
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Yeah, sorry to spoil the fun, but I'm afraid that the vulgar ones are against the guidelines ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirson8

Thanks for telling me. I was searching Doulingo guidelines but i couldn't find anything, so I asked to be sure. Thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Enzfj2
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I wonder, is ściema related to Italian scemo - idiot, fool ? The feminine form scema is pronounced almost the same.

And I have a strong suspicion that obczaj to is really obszczaj to - 'piss on it', in the sense dogs are doing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
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No, "obczaj" and "obszczaj" are definitely different ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arienrhod1

"Obczaj" comes from "czaić" which has 2 meanings:

  1. to lurk

  2. to understand (slang)

The second one is completely unrelated to the first, and may come from the word "czajnik" (kettle). According to some sources, in the seventies, in students' slang "czajnik" meant "a person's head" and that's why the word "czaić" came to mean "to understand" or, more precisely, "to get one's head around something".

Hence, "obczaj to" means "(check it out and) try to get your head around it"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirson8

My guess about word "ściema"(noun) is that it comes from word "ściemniać"(verb) that means "to dim" or "to darken", but also "ściemniać" means "to lie"(verb) in slang.

1 year ago
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