"Ellaesperaelautobúsenfrente."

Translation:She is waiting for the bus in front.

10 months ago

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Trillones
Trillones
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We also say, "She waits (or is waiting) for the bus out front."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Duolingo isn't currently accepting "out front" = enfrente although it should. I'm reporting all of them. "In front" sounds strange to my ears without specifying in front of what?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregoryFal3

Accepted "out front" 9/15/18

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dluzer
dluzer
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As usual you have to imagine more possible contexts with these DL translations. While I agree the likely meaning would be better translated as "She is waiting for the bus out front", it could be that two buses are approaching and the speaker is clarifying which of the two she is waiting for.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gary273758

I put "the front bus" and was marked wrong

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Accepted: "She waits out front for the bus." (Enero, 2019)

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/albamaria919471

In front of what?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryk6

In front of the building you're in. It's a little slangy and clunky, but I've said similar many times. ;)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertasmi12

Hopefully a bar.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cumeon
Cumeon
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The english version makes no sense. It sounds unfinished. Maybe if it was "out front"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snydecomments

yaaaas

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pm145506

I disagree, supposedly you would inside a building or already mentioned a specific place she would be in front of. The other person would understand what you mean by context clues that we don't have only seeing the one sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MasterYods
MasterYods
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Does this mean 'She is in front (of something) waiting for the bus.' or 'She is waiting for the bus (that is in front)'.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It's mean that she's waiting out front or in front of someplace. The bus most likely hasn't arrived yet.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Right... Because she is waiting for it. :-)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyJones12

She is waiting for the bus that is in front (of others probably).

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bradrussel

Why not "she waits" instead of "she is waiting"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Should be accepted

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

"She waits" was accepted for me.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rembob

"She is waiting in front for the bus," seem to me should be acceptable.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/breezy883252

Answer accepted 11/30

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DennisKayK

In the US, we would either say "She is waiting for the bus out front" or "She is waiting for the bus in front OF THE BUILDING" so that in front of WHERE is understood. Please excuse the all caps, I only want my explanation to be understood.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregoryPei1

Also, "She is waiting out front for the bus." should be accepted.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarinaShty

“In front” of what? Unless she’s going to meet that bus head first

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyJones12

In England she would be waiting for the bus that is in front of others as the bus is the object. I understand the American 'out front' to mean directly outside in front of here?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

I think you're correct.

But as others comment, the sentence is poorly worded (ambiguous).

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamSev11

Why would "She waits in front for the bus." It seems to have the same meaning and is how most of the native English speakers I know would say it (unless "in front" is intended to modify the bus, rather than to describe where she is waiting---which seems implausible).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/foulgera12

In England we would say outside but this was marked wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

I think outside is "afuera"... I could be wrong though. Someone please correct me if I am.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

ambiguous sentence

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alan844763

My interpretation is that two buses are arriving at the same time at bus stops a short distance apart (like you get at airports) and she was at the wrong stop so anxiously barged past people with her wheeled suitcase to the annoyance of others. Someone explained, "She is waiting for the bus in front".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinSchaye

I would say she is waiting out front for the bus

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard383448

She is in front waiting for the bus. Should be accepted also.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sylvia12664
sylvia12664
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In all previous exercises, Duo has accepted 'opposite' for enfrente. Now it's wrong!!??

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/parosblue

It has always been my understanding that enfrente means opposite as "across the street" not "in front of" the building on this side of the street.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisUndrh
ChrisUndrh
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That's how I interpreted this sentence- she's waiting for a bus on the other side of the road. Not a possibility for DL though, though I think grammatically acceptable. Reported 15/Nov/2018

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

That translation doesn't seem to work with this sentence. "She waits for the bus opposite" doesn't really make sense.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Many/most words have more than one meaning. Your job is to chose the correct word for the correct meaning.

As you said, "opposite" doesn't work. Therefore, choose a meaning (translation) that does work.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

yes - opposite as when you say the building on the other side of the road (French en face ) . It is she who is waiting in front not the bus -- if the bus were opposite/in front she wouldn't be waiting for it , she would get on ;-) [I'll get my coat]

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeresaTalk3

"She is waiting in front of the bus" should also be accepted. Not clear

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh414399

If she is waiting "in front of the bus" then one can only hope that she is visible to the driver or she will be run over! If she is waiting "in front FOR the bus" then she is probably in no danger! The power of prepositions....

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

I think "of the bus" would be "del autobús".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryk6

Maybe the bus is parked. She may be waiting to board. Lots of reasons she could be in front of the bus and not in danger ;)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

I'm wondering the same. Is she in front of the waiting people, or is the bus the one that is in turn to go (= the next one) ? Either way, sounds funny.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry182846
Barry182846
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My interpretation of the strange English sentence is that she is waiting for the bus in front of this bus, meaning she has missed her bus.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

No because enfrente is an adverb not an adjective - not talking about the 'front bus', it is she who is in front [of some building]

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

Agreed, that's the first thing I thought they must mean, then I thought of the "two buses together" situation. Then I tried Google Translate who said "the bus opposite" ! I would never say "out front", that's US only. I'd say "outside" and point :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Claire277
Claire277
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Just as an experiment i typed "awaiting" instead of "waiting for". It was rejected.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zeus288068

So, now "enfrente" means only in front & not opposite? Why?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snow6oy
snow6oy
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I thought it meant she is waiting in the front bus !

As everyone has rightly said, there is too much ambiguity in the sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Ambiguous as it may be, nowhere in the sentence does it say she is on or in the bus.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stewart582448

The translation sounds to me as if she were waiting for the bus that has already gone. From other peoples reactions, though, the sense seems to be "waiting outside...". A confusing translation!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Virginia71473

A bit tired of not being able to report weird English as an option. In front of what?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

What does it matter? In front of the building... In front of the other busses... Everyone can use their imagination. It doesn't change the sentence. A woman is looking for her daughter. She walks into the grocery store and asks, "Has anyone seen her? She is wearing jeans and a red shirt." A man says, "Yes, I have! She is waiting for the bus in front." In real life, we speak with ambiguity all the time. It seems that you were able to understand the sentence, so don't get upset because Duo didn't let you know what the imaginary girl (or bus) was waiting in front of.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Virginia71473

If I was looking for my child, my next question would be 'In front of what?' or 'Where?' Perhaps it's a dialect thing, but it's not communicating effectively. My main point is that it's hard to learn what the Spanish means in context if the English translation doesn't create a sentence that makes sense to the user. It gives no way of planning when you would use the foreign sentence you are learning. I agree with Stewart582448.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bone3011
bone3011
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Should "espera para/por el autobus" be also considered a valid way to say "waiting for"?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ap9IcIDd

Does this mean the bus that is at the head of a line of buses or a bus that is in front of a structure? How does one make that distinction?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh414399

Is she waiting for the bus in front (of the line)? or is she waiting for the bus in front (of the building)?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ap9IcIDd

Even if it clashes with the company's philosophy Duolingo needs to provide more detailed grammatical instruction and guidance. There should be one person whom Duolingo should make available to answer questions and provide explanations rather than the shotgun style that now seems to be the company's standard operating procedure.

6 days ago
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