"Señor, ¿este abrigo es suyo?"

Translation:Sir, is this coat yours?

February 23, 2018

50 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisDavie19

Help please when do we use tuyo and when suyo. Im muddled

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

Use 'tuyo' when speaking in 2nd person (tú). Use 'suyo' when speaking in 3rd person (usted, él, ella). Please note that both 'tuyo' and 'suyo' can mean 'your'. 'suyo' is simply more formal.

Also, both are possessive pronouns and so stand alone. Example: 'Este libro es suyo' = 'This book is YOURS'. In contrast 'su' is a possessive adjective and cannot stand alone. Example: 'Es su libro' = 'It is YOUR BOOK'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MavisClose1

Sometimes the "suyo" is considered FORMAL...such as when you use words of respect such as "sir" or "ma'am." when you are friendly with someone already, use TUYO.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nancy347503

I try to listen more than read most of the examples. This example did not have the inflection of a question. I wrote "Sir, this coat is yours" because the speaker did not speak it as a question. I guess I'll have to read to check before submitting an answer. ( not the first time this has happened)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Questions in spanish do not always sound the way they do in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mojavejeeper

Jacket used to be accepted as a translation for abrigo. That does not seem to be true anymore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

I think I would advise using chaqueta for jacket. From what I've seen abrigo usually refers to a heavier garment like a coat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippoposthumous

In the US, jacket and coat can mean either. A sport coat, a suit jacket (same thing) A ski jacket, a heavy coat ... they're used interchangeably, like couch and sofa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Jacket=chaqueta, abrigo=coat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilipWest12

I've listened several times and it sounds like he is saying tuyo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

The fact this usted is used lets you know to use the formal "suyo". Sometimes I can't hear the difference either, so I look at the rest of the sentence for clues like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanRafens

Senor sounds like senora in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrrinOther

Mister isn't technically less correct, but nowadays (in the US at least), calling someone "mister" has a cartoonish 1950's quality.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B5429671

Not everywhere in the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heather304956

is this your coat marked incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

There is some difference. Your sentence could be: "¿es este su abrigo?" or ¿este es su abrigo?"
Yours = suyo. Your coat = su abrigo.
Don't know if that's why it wasn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mojavejeeper

Did you actually leave out "Sir"? My brain sometimes decides that's not important enough to put it in the answer (sir, ma'am, miss, etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

Lol... and I thought I was the only one with that issue. A lingot for you in sharing my misery :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

"Your coat" would be "su abrigo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MavisClose1

Senores....the answer is sometimes Gent and sometimes sir.....come on??!! Can't it be either. Please allow both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hjh788272

When addressing someone (singular) I would be unlikely ever to use 'gent'; I might refer to someone as 'the gent' but that would be casual. 'Sir', is the polite term. However, in the plural, I am more likely to use 'gentlemen' but never 'sirs'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Señor=sir, señores=gentlemen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveHarris809825

This highlights a (possibly regional?) issue in English.

Although from Spanish we usually understand «señor» to equate to "sir" and «caballero» to mean "gentleman", it is uncommon in most parts of the world to pluralise the English "sir" as "sirs".

Both would become "gentlemen".

Similarly you do not see "madams" but "ladies".

Spanish, of course, is fine with «señores» and «caballeros».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James.Carroll

This is an interesting anomaly. On a previous answer, sirs in the plural for senores was considered incorrect, yet sir in the singular for senor is correct. This anomaly should be corrected


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

I think they change the plural to gentlemen because sirs isn't used in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James.Carroll

Okay, I understand that Duolingo is speaking more in terms of acceptable English than acceptable Spanish now. Do we never use sirs to mean gentlemen? Although I would agree that it is uncommon, it is occasionally used, and therefore, I would submit it is not incorrect in English in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James.Carroll

Interestingly, I just checked the online Spanish dictionary and their translation for senores is sirs, not gentlemen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Yes, that is the literal translation, but I don't think it's used in English. (Except when talking about knights, ladies, and sirs)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrrinOther

"Sir, is this coat yours" is correct, but "Is this coat yours, sir?" is incorrect. Oh Duo. [Jan 2019]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanRafens

I hope when I go to Spain next year, people speak more clearly! Senor sounds like Senora in this sentence. Tuyo sounds like suyo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

That's because it is "suyo" not "tuyo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeMatthe3

A rerecording of this phrase is needed. I've listened to it over again and to me it always sounds like tuyo and not suyo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

It's hard to distinguish between the two sometimes, but the fact that "señor" is used lets you know to use the formal "suyo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeMatthe3

I get that but when you play the recording back on the slower setting, my brain doesn’t kick into translation mode that quickly, there is a definite ‘T’ sound which left me scratching my head a little bit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grandmalafaunda

Can't senor mean Mister also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B5429671

Why not, "Mister, is this coat yours?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annamere

To me (Canadian) 'mister' without the name of the man sounds rude. I would always say 'sir' if I didn't know the name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeThomas970766

Okay, so on a previous question I put "Sirs these coats are yours" for "Señores, estos abrigos son suyos." and it was rejected in favor of "Gentlemen, these coats are yours". But in this case "Señor, este abrigo es suyo" equals "Sir". Can we have some consistency please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annamere

In my experience 'sirs' is not something that is normally used in this way in English. I would always say 'gentlemen' when addressing a group of men not known to me, but of course 'sir' to one man in the same group.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhixon

i get it wrong for saying senores as sirs and not gents and this has to be sir not gent. Be consistent duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertopas862491

I think duolingo has made a rod for it's back by putting "señor" / "señora etc before the question because unless you are in a formal situation i.e. hotel porter / cloakroom butler etc you would just say "is this cost yours" or "excuse me, is this coat yours ?" Their phrase has created a lot of problems and shows how quirky English is. Much more simple to say Señor or senores for single or plural. If, however you were that butler or be in a formal situation of returning coats to a man or group of men, you would say "gentlemen" or "gents"to a group of men, never "sirs". To an individual man you would say "sir" and never "gentleman" or 'gent". We would begin a speech to a group of people with "Ladies and Gentlemen". I believe a Spaniard may start with Senores y Senoras ? Either way we wouldn't say Ma'ams and sirs !!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

What, exactly, is your point?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

It would sound odd to say "gent, is this coat yours". Duo has always translated "señor" as "sir".

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.