"Señor,¿esteabrigoessuyo?"

Translation:Sir, is this coat yours?

10 months ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisDavie19

Help please when do we use tuyo and when suyo. Im muddled

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Use 'tuyo' when speaking in 2nd person (tú). Use 'suyo' when speaking in 3rd person (usted, él, ella). Please note that both 'tuyo' and 'suyo' can mean 'your'. 'suyo' is simply more formal.

Also, both are possessive pronouns and so stand alone. Example: 'Este libro es suyo' = 'This book is YOURS'. In contrast 'su' is a possessive adjective and cannot stand alone. Example: 'Es su libro' = 'It is YOUR BOOK'.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MavisClose1

Sometimes the "suyo" is considered FORMAL...such as when you use words of respect such as "sir" or "ma'am." when you are friendly with someone already, use TUYO.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

Jacket used to be accepted as a translation for abrigo. That does not seem to be true anymore.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I think I would advise using chaqueta for jacket. From what I've seen abrigo usually refers to a heavier garment like a coat.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hippoposthumous

In the US, jacket and coat can mean either. A sport coat, a suit jacket (same thing) A ski jacket, a heavy coat ... they're used interchangeably, like couch and sofa.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Jacket=chaqueta, abrigo=coat

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

I can see no reason why you were downvoted for that link. It's completely relevant and also highlights the regional differences around gentlemen, caballeros, señores etc.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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You're wrong, it's not me. Why do you say that?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

Hello, ?Blas?

My comment was complimenting you. When I first saw this thread, somebody had downvoted your original post about comment 27796501.

I upvoted it again because I think you have provided a useful link.

I don't quite understand your comment, but believe me, I was paying you a compliment!

Dave

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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DaveHarris809825, thank you for your words. I hadn't seen it, and believe me I don´t mind the downvoting. Regards.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nancy347503

I try to listen more than read most of the examples. This example did not have the inflection of a question. I wrote "Sir, this coat is yours" because the speaker did not speak it as a question. I guess I'll have to read to check before submitting an answer. ( not the first time this has happened)

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woa7dSD5
woa7dSD5
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Same here.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Questions in spanish do not always sound the way they do in English.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MavisClose1

Senores....the answer is sometimes Gent and sometimes sir.....come on??!! Can't it be either. Please allow both.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

When addressing someone (singular) I would be unlikely ever to use 'gent'; I might refer to someone as 'the gent' but that would be casual. 'Sir', is the polite term. However, in the plural, I am more likely to use 'gentlemen' but never 'sirs'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Señor=sir, señores=gentlemen

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

This highlights a (possibly regional?) issue in English.

Although from Spanish we usually understand «señor» to equate to "sir" and «caballero» to mean "gentleman", it is uncommon in most parts of the world to pluralise the English "sir" as "sirs".

Both would become "gentlemen".

Similarly you do not see "madams" but "ladies".

Spanish, of course, is fine with «señores» and «caballeros».

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heather304956

is this your coat marked incorrect

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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There is some difference. Your sentence could be: "¿es este su abrigo?" or ¿este es su abrigo?"
Yours = suyo. Your coat = su abrigo.
Don't know if that's why it wasn't accepted.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

Did you actually leave out "Sir"? My brain sometimes decides that's not important enough to put it in the answer (sir, ma'am, miss, etc.)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Lol... and I thought I was the only one with that issue. A lingot for you in sharing my misery :)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I guess the required translation is a compromise between what we are actually most likely to say in English and an indication that we understand how it is said in Spanish, usually with preference for the latter.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

"Your coat" would be "su abrigo".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James.Carroll
James.Carroll
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This is an interesting anomaly. On a previous answer, sirs in the plural for senores was considered incorrect, yet sir in the singular for senor is correct. This anomaly should be corrected

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

I think they change the plural to gentlemen because sirs isn't used in English.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James.Carroll
James.Carroll
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Okay, I understand that Duolingo is speaking more in terms of acceptable English than acceptable Spanish now. Do we never use sirs to mean gentlemen? Although I would agree that it is uncommon, it is occasionally used, and therefore, I would submit it is not incorrect in English in general.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James.Carroll
James.Carroll
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Interestingly, I just checked the online Spanish dictionary and their translation for senores is sirs, not gentlemen.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Yes, that is the literal translation, but I don't think it's used in English. (Except when talking about knights, ladies, and sirs)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipWest12

I've listened several times and it sounds like he is saying tuyo

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

The fact this usted is used lets you know to use the formal "suyo". Sometimes I can't hear the difference either, so I look at the rest of the sentence for clues like that.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zhixon
zhixon
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i get it wrong for saying senores as sirs and not gents and this has to be sir not gent. Be consistent duolingo

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

It would sound odd to say "gent, is this coat yours". Duo has always translated "señor" as "sir".

2 weeks ago
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