"Tengoqueponerlalecheenlanevera."

Translation:I have to put the milk in the refrigerator.

10 months ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EvgeniyChe3
EvgeniyChe3
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So now it's nevera!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Are you using the report button to suggest all the additional vocabulary? Mentioning it here might not be enough. :-)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

which is more common? refrigerador o nevera?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ced609

In Spain they tend to say nevera at home. A refrigerador tends to refer to something bigger - in a shop or the fridge that the butcher would store his meat in.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robert672165

In the US, we used to say icebox. Word usage changes over time.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Which is funny, because ice-boxes used to have a large chunk of ice at the top. I remember vaguely seeing the iceman come(th) as a very small child. My husband remembers the ice house where they got ice for the Coca Cola truck cooler. (His father's employer.)

However, I (northeast coast to OH and now CA, b 1943) would never use that term now. It's the refrigerator, possibly the fridge. My husband, from NC and Georgia, b 1940,

Some people would say Frigidaire like I still say Kleenex. Where are you from?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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It depends on where you are. My students, most of who are from Sonora, use refrigeradora (yet a third word).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/---Sonja---
---Sonja---
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Why is "I have to put the milk into the fridge" not accepted? When I learned english in school we were told to use the term "into"when we put something inside or go inside. Is that not common english anymore? I reported it anyway

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Report it, it should be. In can be used for stative situations ( The box is in the bag), in which case you can usually substitute inside. It can also be used for active situations ( Put the box in the bag), in which case into can usually be substituted. Exactly where the divisions between in/into and in/inside gets made is probably a matter of dialect, idiolect, context, or a mixture of all three. Always using in won't necessarily mark you as a non-native English speaker.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura708648

Why is it poner if the verb poner conjugates to yo pongo?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan144464

Because poner is the infinitive, like to put instead of I put. It is used in exactly the same way you would say it in English, i have (yo tengo que) to put (poner)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dbrousseau1

Why does que need to be in there?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Because "tener que" is an expression that means "to have to".

"tener" by itself means "to have (something)" and would be followed by a noun.

I have the milk=Tengo la leche.

But "I have put the milk..." ("put" here is a past participle, like "placed, seen"...)="He puesto la leche" ...(not with tener, but a form of haber+past participle, — which is otherwise only used as "There is/are"=Hay leche en la nevera)

And then there's "I have to" (i.e. I need to + verb infinitive, where the "to" isn't the infinitive "to", but part of the "have to" expression) "I have to - put the milk..."= "Tengo que - poner la leche..."

So "have" has many meanings in English, and 2 use tener in Spanish in different ways, and one uses "haber" which also has a different use.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Love your response, but it's tener que not tenir que. I get those two endings mixed up a lot, since their conjugations are so similar.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Thanks! I'll edit it. I thought it didn't look right. Should have checked!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello bonbayel: I also think your response is very good, but I think you meant "haber" not "habre". Lingots for you.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Good eyes! Thank you! I wonder where that came from? Maybe I was working with future or conditional and had 'habr-' stuck in my head? It's now corrected.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/del537547

means the same as "I must put the milk in the fridge"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheMightyFro

I always heard "nevera" used for a freezer, as opposed to a refrigerator.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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I'm curious to know where? This word seems to have many meanings, depending on geography, and otherwise, a refrigerator can also be 'refrigerador' or 'refrigeradora' as well as 'nevera' in different locations.
And what other words are used, and where, for freezer?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheMightyFro

I’ve heard nevera in Mexico

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Meaning fridge or freezer?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheMightyFro

Freezer. We used “refri” for the fridge.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Wow! I've never heard that one. I'd love to see a map of where all these words are used! Someone wrote that his Northern Mexican students used "refrigeradora", while other places used the masculine.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spencer754184

What makes it important to imclude the "the" in the tranlation? Why couldnt it be "I have to put milk in the refrigerator" ..? sometimes the article translates directly and sometimes it disappears

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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'the milk' implies some you have at hand or in your bag. 'Milk' is generic, implying that you're out of milk and need to get some in the fridge.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alec851453

"I have put milk in the fridge" is a general statement implying that in the past you have used the refrigerator to store milk. This is as opposed to putting some specific bottle of milk in the refrigerator, like "Where did you put the milk?", "I put the milk in the fridge".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Every language I've learned uses articles differently. We just have to see and hear them enough until it becomes normal.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janiners21

I put "I must put the milk in the fridge" and got it wrong. Why?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Because they are trying to keep 3 verbs separate, which maybe are in Spanish, but its adored distinction in English.
tener que = have to
deber = must
necesitar = need to

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karahomar876

I have to put the milk in the fridge should be correct. That's correct English.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JCKeasler

Why isn't "I must put the milk in the fridge" accepted here.

5 days ago
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