"Siempre estoy en casa después de las cinco."

Translation:I am always at home after five.

11 months ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scotologic
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"I always am at home after five" was not accepted 2/26/18. Reported.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmineHadji1
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Because it's not grammatically correct. We don't put adverb of frequency before the verb to be.

  • I am always/frequently/often/never ... (correct)
  • I always/frequently/often/never am ... (incorrect, even though widely used)
11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It is not the normal colloquial word order to put the "adverb of frequency" before the verb "to be," but occasionally very experienced writers do it in order to be dramatic. Like you, I would advise most writers not to do it, but it is not grammatically incorrect per se. Also, most native speakers will look at you oddly if you say "I always am at home after five."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Thank you.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tothadam06
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This word order is unusual, even weird in standalone statements but fairly common in responses. I'm not sure if it's correct or not. eg. - You should be home by five. - I always am.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461

What is the reasoning of putting siempre in front of estoy? Just wondering.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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Adverbs are usually put in front of the word they modify, especially these adverbs of frequency. If you say "Estoy siempre en casa", that's alright as well, but sounds a bit like "always home" is a condition you're currently in.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielzabuski
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Because if you put "siempre" implies that you always are at home at that hour, the 365 days of the year. In the other hand with just "estoy" can be only for that day.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sylvia977595

What is wrong with I am always at home after 5.p.m.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielzabuski
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It´s ok, but it´s not exactly the sentense, this never said P.M. can be also A.M. and in most of the case in DL they never use numbers.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeverlyLou2

The sentence sounds grammatically incorrest

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Both the Spanish and English sound find to me. Which are you questioning?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Natalia302555

I am always home after five. Why "at" needed?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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It's not needed. Your translation sounds fine.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elojo1

What is wrong with "I am always in the house after 5." please.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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"En casa" is more accurately translated by "at home". Notice the lack of an article in both expressions.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yydelilah

Why "de las cinco"? Why not just "las cinco"?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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The de here goes with después. You always need to say "después de" if you want to say that something is happening "after [something]".

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinArre888442

Isn't cinco masculine? and singular? From what I understand numbers take on the form of the noun it is accompanying. OK, so in this case I get the feminine use of "cinco". But why "las". Why not just "la"? There is nothing else in this sentence that is plural. EDIT, It appears as though you do consistently use "las" but I would just like to find out why.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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Numbers used as nouns are generally masculine and singular, yes. But the number is not used as a noun here.

The full phrase for expressing clock times in Spanish is "las [número] horas", so there's the plural-feminine part. Horas gets left out most of the time, but the article stays. Also note that "one o'clock" is "la una (hora)".

  • I eat lunch at one o'clock. - Almuerzo a la una.
2 weeks ago
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