https://www.duolingo.com/leCommune

Russian Hoildays

Hello, today at my school a Russian girl was talking to me about holidays in Russia. She told me some interesting facts that I would have expected as an american. In Russia, many do not celebrate Halloween. Many russians consider Halloween as the day of hell. Many schools were forced to shutdown Halloween parties do to complaints from parents.

Two, on Valentine's Day the boy is the only one who gives the girl a present. So when you go to Russia on Valentine's Day and are dating a Russian, don't expect a present back.

Three, in Russia, they do not celebrate Santa Claus but Grandfather Frost which was introduced during the time of the Soviet Union. Putin would usually show off Grandfather Frost at the Captial of Moscow. I don't really ask her details on how Father Frost works and how send present to children. But I will make sure to update you all tomorrow.

I am planning to learn Russian next year and her advice on holidays was a bit helpful.

11 months ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

I love all of this. I was never allowed to celebrate Halloween because of the same reason, and I always thought it too forward for a girl to give the guy a present and not the other way around....Thank you for sharing all of it for us to learn even more of Russian culture!:)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

Whoa, three splendid myths in a row! haha

Nice tales but (almost) no connection to reality.

First: Halloween

The day of all saints is not a great celebration in the Orthodox Christianity tradition. So it hasn't been celebrated at all until recently, and is not exactly a part of our culture. It is always good to have another holiday, of course, and the youth appreciate that, but the Orthodox believers frown at it (or at least refuse to take part in it) as being something culturally alien to them, and secular people frown at it (or at least refuse to take part in it) because it is clearly a non-domestic tradition which is not any part of their cultural identity either.

So, with so few remaining participants and all the rest thinking it to be annoying nonsense and rolling their eyes at it, making a celebration official (like at school) does not make any sense. So any voice against does the trick and serves as an excuse to not hold it.

You are free to carve your own pumpkin, paint your face and dress as a vampire and head out with your friends to have a party of your own. There's no problem with that and many people do. It's just that it is not viral all across the land.

Second: St.Valentine's Day

Same here: it is neither Orthodox nor secular, and it is relatively new and has not quite rooted in the popular culture. Giving presents is not gender-related, but it can well be that when you give your present to someone, they respond with "Oh, it's so nice, but I haven't thought it was a special day for you and have nothing in return; it is so awkward, I'm so sorry... but thanks anyway!"

It is true though that boys are much more expected to give presents to girls when they date (a.k.a. "конфетно-букетный период [отношений]"- "the sweets and flowers stage [of relationship]). But it has nothing to do with St.Valentine's Day.

Third: Santa Claus vs. Father Frost

The character (as an elderly mage/wizard of cold) apparently predates Santa (and Christianity altogether) by quite a few centuries, and was strong enough to survive christianization in the popular culture. This character can also be seen in many Slavic cultures, and also in Nordic cultures. In fact, the guy might have been imported from the Norse culture by Varangians as Joulupukki or another Woden (Jólnir) -related character.

Дед may mean both "grandfather" (a family member) and "old man", so the translation of Дед Мороз as Grandpa Frost is not very accurate despite being very common. It's more like Oldster Frost, or Whitebeard Frost.

Being pre-Christian, the character obviously was NOT introduced during the time of the Soviet Union, it is seen in folklore fairy tale "Morozko" (which is the name of the character there), which plot is traditional throughout the whole Europe with pretty much every people having a version of it.

It did come out of the shades during the soviet times though, as the authority of the church (opposing the character as being pagan) was weakened.

Anyway, the character's fusing with Santa Claus is known to begin in imperial (pre-soviet) Russia, too.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1Pozin2
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 637

Well done! And there is also Snow Maiden there (Снегурочка - Snegurochka).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

Right, sad story about her, whatever the version is.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RayC628481
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Peter, is there any holiday tradition that you cannot ruin for everyone? j/k
Put her in summer and she'll be a ... happy Snow Maiden!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

is there any holiday tradition that you cannot ruin for everyone?

No, there isn't. I'm an expert party pooper :-P ;-)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

Peter should have been a historian in another era, I think:). And, that Frozen reference was perfect, Ray. It has been appreciated...)))

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

that Frozen reference was perfect, Ray. It has been appreciated...)))

Absolutely.

And it got me thinking whether it is better to melt than to live to mature into a Snow Queen...

Besides, that shepherd Lel', whom the Snow Maiden falls in love with according to one of the versions, is suspected to be not that simple a guy after all. I wonder if she stood any chances to remain cold-hearted at all...

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

He sounds fairly enjoyable to be around, in my book.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmitriy-kalmykov

Все верно но добавлю что среди людей постарше оооочень распространено неприятие дня валентина... для молодежи это весело... а такие как я ворчуны (даже не будучи сильно религиозны) говорят - "лучше бы отмечали "Петра и Февронью" как культ семьи а не фривольный (читай меж строк безнравственный :-) ) заморский праздник". Каюсь я и сам так говорю :-) и поверьте сколько вижу вокруг себя здесь в России - чем старше тем шире неприятие дня Валентина. И хотя часто противопоставляют "Валентина" и "Петра и Февронью" но неприятие "валентина" намного шире чем почитание "Петра и Февроньи". В Ростове-на-Дону "день валентина" совпал с "днем освобождения города от немецко-фашистских войск" и потому здесь даже молодежь активно культивирует что это мол не настоящий праздник (день валентина) а вот освобождение Ростова настоящий праздник , но это местная особенность. А еще в России ходит много жупелов о том что якобы "день валентина" этот праздник раскручен членами ЛГБТ (в России очень патриархальные взгляды на это и даже те кто не агрессивны к ЛГБТ все равно воспринимает связь с этой темой как позор), хотя фактов подтверждающих это по сути нет , так просто миф в роли пугала.

my English is poor ... К сожалению я не смогу такую длинную и сложную речь изложить по английски I hope will understand me

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

лучше бы отмечали "Петра и Февронью" как культ семьи

Now this is what I roll eyes at :))))

The story is just crazy and has very little to do with family cult. Or anything family.

It rather features:

  • dragons (a Christian story, right);

  • adultery with dragons (like Peter's brother's wife could not tell a dragon from her husband, or notice there was something odd about his behavior, uh-huh);

  • enchanted swords (just like king Arthur's one);

  • witchery (in Fevronia magically curing Peter's leprosy caused by the dragon's blood sprayed over him);

  • forced marriage (Peter having to marry Fevronia after all despite a failed attempt to avoid it);

  • mind control (Peter, being the Prince of Murom, leaves Murom following exiled Fevronia despite his previous attempt to avoid marrying her in the first place - voluntarily? Right...);

  • and even a bit of necromancy (controlling the dead and buried bodies whereabouts. By the way, how come the disappearance of the bodies from the graves became known? Were they watched, or checked, or what?).

Isn't it just creepy? )))

Okay, it truly is a breathtakingly brilliant piece of fantasy literature. It lacks a bit for not featuring elves, orcs and dwarves, but it's fine given that it was written in 16th century.

But making a real cult out of it? Seriously? Come on...

Besides, there's one other reason for St.Valentine to beat Peter+Fevronia: the way to celebrate.

It's simple with St.Valentine. Take pink cardboard and scissors, cut a heart-shaped piece, write something sweet on it, give it away. Can't be clearer.

And what can I do for PeterFevronia?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmitriy-kalmykov

Ну во первых я не религиозен и мне лень выступать ЯРЫМ защитником этих святых,
во вторых наивно воспринимать жития святых как историческую достоверность,
в третьих высмеять можно почти все (что демонстрирует ум но не всегда выставляет красиво критика) но как по мне так наоборот сам образ этих святых хорошо иллюстрирует семейные отношения которые сначала подвергаются испытаниям а потом отношения становятся прочными и здесь можно действительно брать пример(но это долгая дискуссия которая просто не влезет в эту тему), кстати я помню в детстве наблюдал неоднократно как старики умирали в один день ... а сейчас уходят поколение более современных взглядов советского атеистического воспитания... часто ли современные супруги умирают в один день? тут есть о чем задуматься (хотя при желании можно и это высмеять),
в четвертых я сразу не спорил что для молодежи праздновать день валентина веселее и легче.

еще раз повторюсь не религиозный я человек и не буду втягиваться в дальнейшую дискуссию на эту тему

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

Если серьезно, то я не уверен, что когда люди умирают в один день - это хорошо. Это очень романтично, но совсем не обязательно хорошо.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmitriy-kalmykov

Хорошо это или плохо наверно судить невозможно - будет в любом случае предвзято (как полстакана это наполовину пуст или наполовину полон?). Но это говорит об абсолютном единении двух людей... "душа в душу" (вы знаете эту фразу)... или если кому ближе то библейское "два в одно"(не надо все в физиологическом смысле мы же люди а не звери у которых все движется 5 инстинктами). Все реже встречаешь стариков "держащихся за руки" ...

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

Но это говорит об абсолютном единении двух людей...

Либо о пищевом отравлении. Но даже если и о единении - я не уверен, что это хорошо. Всё-таки взрослый человек должен быть способен к самостоятельной жизни, а смыслов у этой жизни должно быть несколько, иначе потеря объекта привязанности действительно может привести к преждевременной кончине.

Я не говорю, что так не бывает, я говорю, что это не обязательно хорошо. Помогать нянчиться с внуками / правнуками - это значительно лучше и светлее.

"Жить живым" - фраза ничуть не хуже, чем "душа в душу", и, к тому же, ей не противоречит.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmitriy-kalmykov

помните сказку о том как курицу делили на семью? ножки сыновьям, крылышки дочерям... дети и внуки только и ждут чтоб убежать и улететь от вашей заботы о них... это вам нужны дети и внуки... а им ... после определенного возраста им скажем так некогда уделять вам внимание и в какой то момент единственный человек который может быть с вами ВСЕГДА рядом и будет разделять с вами ВСЕ мелочи вашей жизни это ваша половинка если с ней повезло, рано или поздно этот момент наступает у всех

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

помните сказку о том как курицу делили на семью? ножки сыновьям, крылышки дочерям...

Помню. Только в том варианте, который я помню, делили гусей. Причем эта байка сопровождала разделку в рамках классического сюжета "умный бедняк и глупый богач", т.е. служила лапшой на уши богачу. Если я не путаю, то сам барин получил гусиную голову (как глава семьи), а барыня получила огузок ("в доме сидеть, за домом смотреть"), после чего бедняк забрал себе "остатки" - т.е. всего остального гуся.

дети и внуки только и ждут чтоб убежать и улететь от вашей заботы о них... это вам нужны дети и внуки... а им ... после определенного возраста им скажем так некогда уделять вам внимание

Да, педагогические ошибки в результате которых дети стремятся как можно быстрее и как можно сильнее отдалиться от родителей - это частая история и отдельная тема для отдельного большого и серьезного разговора. Про психогигиену я уже где-то брюзжал, а это смежная тема.

Но это опять же не говорит о том, что обнуление собственной личности и превращение в чей-то придаток, приводящее к одновременной смерти - это непременно хорошо.

Можно прекрасно уживаться вместе, не утрачивая при этом самодостаточности.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leCommune

Ok then

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leCommune

You really do know your stuff!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

Well, it's an overview. The scholars who really know this stuff write books on it ))))

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leCommune

I never said it had something to do with Valentine's Day. I said that's how they do it.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

You mean that boys are expected to give flowers and jewelry to girls more often than the other way around? Well, yes, but I guess it's not only the Russian oddity.

I assume it's about some chivalry and that sort of stuff. You gotta prove you can take care of the lady, or you're not worth her.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

I assume it's about some chivalry and that sort of stuff. You gotta prove you can take care of the lady, or you're not worth her.

If only the guys here would think that way, the girls wouldn't complain as much..:). We all used to joke about moving to Russia as a group for this reason.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

You better think twice about it, because in a paternalist patriarchal culture it all ends with marriage, after which it turns into the local version of the 3K thing. According to домострой.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

I think there's a pretty medium between those two extremes...)))

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/exp271828
  • 25
  • 15
  • 7
  • 7
  • 17

Hmmm ... not a native Russian, but I thought it was Дедушка Мороз (Grandfather Frost)? Anyhow, nice post - спасибо!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leCommune

You're correct

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RayC628481
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Come to think of it, I never got anything for Valentines. It's always me who had to initiate something! I know that in Japanese manga culture, usually the girl is supposed to do something... but is that really the norm? As a non Russian does that mean I've missed out on all the fun?

Yes дед мороз and his grand-daughter, too. And my Russian friend swears, that the signature red robes originated from him, not Santa...

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
  • 22
  • 18
  • 13
  • 95

my Russian friend swears, that the signature red robes originated from him, not Santa...

I very much doubt that. Дед мороз can appear in red, blue (sky-blue to navy-blue), white or even light cyan coat. I.e. red is not necessary.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RayC628481
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

I for one would love for Santa to adopt all these colors. Sky-blue and white are both great colors. Yes, I like Christmas a lot.

11 months ago
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.