"¿Están durmiendo los niños?"

Translation:Are the children sleeping?

5 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mpt5072
mpt5072
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Can you say "Estan los ninos durmiendo?" or does that sound awkward in Spanish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

You can't split the verbs.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allinuse
Allinuse
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I can see the logic in that, but can you say "Los niños están durmiendo?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mommarigo
mommarigo
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I don't think so. In spanish, questions usually start with a verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ant885895
ant885895
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"¿Los niños están durmiendo?" is acceptable question structure.

Spanish questions often begin with an interrogative or a verb.

But there is no requirement to do so.

Subject - verb - object is grammatically correct (and common) for spanish question word structure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

Yes, you can.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Here are two examples where the subject is placed between two verbs:

¿Están ustedes comiendo?
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6327145

¿Pueden ellas demostrar eso?
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1222066

However, i can't find any examples where the subject between two verbs includes an article. Maybe the subject has to be a pronoun for this type of word order? I'm having a hard time finding rules on this type of question structure which doesn't contain interrogative words. The few I have found avoids the topic of subject placement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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It would be good to get a native speakers/ advanced spanish speakers opinion on this please!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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Ok I started a discussion topic on this and apparently the verbs can be split: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11590244$comment_id=11591502

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

You can split the verbs.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alvares_21

why is "are the children asleep" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Because the lesson is on gerunds, so durmiendo is sleeping.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scobie712
Scobie712
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I did the same thing (almost . . . I had "are the kids asleep").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelSmells
MelSmells
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could it also be "estan durmiendo a los ninos"? or "los ninos estan durmiendo"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silpha2
silpha2
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I thought gerunds were verb forms used as nouns, e.g. Running is good exercise. These mostly look like present participles to me. Is the definition different in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra

silpha2! Yes gerunds are nouns.,Gerundio is never a noun. Gerundio is for instance used with estar as an auxilary verb and is then like present continuous but restricted to what is happening now.

We are swimming/Estamos nadando BUT Swimming is nice/Nadar es bonito

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/presprog.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Now I know how to say 'sleeping' and 'walking' in spanish. So, how do I say 'sleepwalking'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra

Say el sonambulismo. You cannot use the Spanish gerundio as a noun or an adjective

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Sleepwalk is a verb caminar dormido o ser sonámbulo. The gerundio would be caminando dormido o siendo sonámbulo. I'm supposing you can form a gerundio from a compound verb. If not I would appreciate your advice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra

Aha, sleepwalk is to walk slept in Spanish. Hence the gerundio walking slept must be caminando dormido as you say. But I am a foreigner and a beginner in Spanish. We must wait for an expert to be sure. Might be of interest: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/spanish/ency/article/000808.htm It is the first article I read in Spanish and I understood most of it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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That's right kirakrakra.

The English gerund is a noun derived from a verb, (and we should note that in English a noun can also act as an adjective).

However there is no equivalent to the gerund in Spanish. The Spanish gerundio (also called participio presente) is always un adverbio.

So gerund (English) is always a noun; gerundio (Spanish) is never a noun. It confuses a lot of people (some of whom should know better), but, although gerund (in English) and gerundio (in Spanish) look and sound similar, they are different parts of speech.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Incidentally, sonambulismo in your example is a noun, el sonambulismo. The English equivalent is somnambulism, also a noun.

Don't get confused by the alternative English term, sleepwalking; yes, it is a gerund ... a noun derived from the verb to sleepwalk, but gerunds do not exist in Spanish.

Oh, and don't be confused by some (otherwise reliable) ES/EN dictionaries that translate gerund to gerundio and vice versa. It is definitely, indubitably, sin duda WRONG!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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And another thing kirakrakra ...

Thank you for the reference. The article is very interesting. It also reminds me of something else about gerundios. I noticed that there is not one in the whole article. (In fact the only word that looks like el gerundio is a spelling mistake! In the first paragraph, estando should be estado.)

Despite the fact that DL has a whole set of exercises on them, I understand that gerundios are quite rare in spanish. That of course means that las perífrasis de estar más gerundio (continuo o tiempo progresivo) are also relatively rare. Most of the time, especially in conversation, you will hear presente instead.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldricMeints
AldricMeints
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Could someone clarify this for me. I swear I have heard durmiendo used as an action particularly like, estoy durmiendo mi bebe. "I am putting my baby to sleep".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra

yes, «dormir» is also «put to sleep» see more: http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/spanish-english/dormir

2 years ago
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