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  5. "¿Están durmiendo los niños?"

"¿Están durmiendo los niños?"

Translation:Are the children sleeping?

March 20, 2013

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpt5072

Can you say "Estan los ninos durmiendo?" or does that sound awkward in Spanish?

March 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

You can't split the verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allinuse

I can see the logic in that, but can you say "Los niños están durmiendo?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

I don't think so. In spanish, questions usually start with a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ant885895

"¿Los niños están durmiendo?" is acceptable question structure.

Spanish questions often begin with an interrogative or a verb.

But there is no requirement to do so.

Subject - verb - object is grammatically correct (and common) for spanish question word structure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissSpell

Here are two examples where the subject is placed between two verbs:

¿Están ustedes comiendo?
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6327145

¿Pueden ellas demostrar eso?
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1222066

However, i can't find any examples where the subject between two verbs includes an article. Maybe the subject has to be a pronoun for this type of word order? I'm having a hard time finding rules on this type of question structure which doesn't contain interrogative words. The few I have found avoids the topic of subject placement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thekatmorgan

It would be good to get a native speakers/ advanced spanish speakers opinion on this please!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thekatmorgan

Ok I started a discussion topic on this and apparently the verbs can be split: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11590244$comment_id=11591502


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosieStrawberry

You can split the verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

According to this, in the past perfect, for yes-no questions, the subject goes at the end.

The auxiliary verb (haber) and the main verb cannot be separated. http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/pastperfect.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alvares_21

why is "are the children asleep" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scobie712

I did the same thing (almost . . . I had "are the kids asleep").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelSmells

could it also be "estan durmiendo a los ninos"? or "los ninos estan durmiendo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silpha2

I thought gerunds were verb forms used as nouns, e.g. Running is good exercise. These mostly look like present participles to me. Is the definition different in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

silpha2! Yes gerunds are nouns.,Gerundio is never a noun. Gerundio is for instance used with estar as an auxilary verb and is then like present continuous but restricted to what is happening now.

We are swimming/Estamos nadando BUT Swimming is nice/Nadar es bonito

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/presprog.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Good observation.

An English gerund is a (English) present participle that is used as a noun.

The present participle is also used, in English, to form the present progressive (continuous) tense. ( I am running.)

"Running is good exercise" = "El correr es un buen ejercicio". (Although Duo usually does not use the "el" with the gerund-infinitive.)
'I am running" = "Estoy corriendo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AchyuthanS

Now I know how to say 'sleeping' and 'walking' in spanish. So, how do I say 'sleepwalking'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Say el sonambulismo. You cannot use the Spanish gerundio as a noun or an adjective


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AldricMeints

Could someone clarify this for me. I swear I have heard durmiendo used as an action particularly like, estoy durmiendo mi bebe. "I am putting my baby to sleep".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

Yes, it is used as an action, in the present progressive tense.
See my comment above.

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