"Sie lesen die Zeitung."

Translation:They read the newspaper.

March 2, 2018

29 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VISHISACHDEVA

how can yot tell whether to use Sie=they or Sie=she


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaruniKaushik

It would depend on the verb.

Sie liest = "She reads" Sie lesen = "You read" (formal address) or "they read"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanMorten4

The more difficult question is how do you determine the difference between 'Sie' = they and 'Sie' = you when "Sie" is the first word in the sentence meaning it will be capitalized no matter what, and both forms use -en endings on verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyAnderson2

Outside of linear learning apps the meaning would be derived from situational context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PRADEEP200914

Why no "are reading"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Both "They read the newspaper" and "They are reading the newspaper" are possible (and accepted) translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam941320

I wrote "They are reading a newspaper" and it was wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshKeen2

"die Zeitung" = the newspaper "Ein Zeitung" = a newspaper


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Zeitung is feminine, so you can't use the masculine/neuter ein.

It has to be eine Zeitung for "a newspaper".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JVLint2225

by now Ive learned the gramatical gender of some words in German is wierd but...

WHY ON EARTH IS A NEWSPAPER FEMININE?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emi_ej98

Where should we use 'read' and 'are reading'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That is a question to ask your English teacher.

German does not make this distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

WHY ON EARTH IS A NEWSPAPER FEMININE?

Don't go looking for reasons behind German genders.

There's usually no good reason for why a certain word has the gender it has other than "because that's how I learned the language from my parents".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vimal_Chawda

when she and they as you have put twixe capital S ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

The conjugated verb form tells you that this is not 3rd pers. sing. sie (= she) because then it'd be sie liest, hence it is either 3rd pers. plur. sie (= they) or formal you. To distinguish those, you'd need context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nyah636379

I really think they should somehow explain how you can tell the difference, especially without the verb and the explanation underneath...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nancy703521

"die Zeitung" can mean either "the newspaper" OR "the newspapers"! My answer was "They are reading the newspapers" and that was declared incorrect. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaruniKaushik

No, "Zeitung" is female, and therefore, "the newspaper" would translate to "die Zeitung". For "the newspaperS", you would have to use the plural form. It would be translated as "die Zeitungen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nancy703521

AK, you are correct. Google Translate misled me on this one. Always have to view Google Translate as a rough indicator and not definitive. "die Zeitung" is the newspaper (singular)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/14FarhanMa

Why is it not 'den Zeitung' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why is it not 'den Zeitung' ?

den is masculine accusative, but Zeitung is feminine.

So you need feminine accusative die Zeitung.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/penguingo

There's somewhat of a chart for this:

<pre> Nominativ Akkusativ Dativ </pre>

Masculine der den dem Feminine die die der Neutral das das dem

Nominativ is when the noun in question is the subject. Let's take the following sentence as an example: the man walks. "Der" is the word you would use preceding "Mann," so this would be "Der Mann spaziert."

Akkusative is when the noun is the direct object. Let's use the man again: A woman calls the man. "Die Frau ruft DEN Mann an." This time, the woman is the subject, the man is the object. Therefore, "der" becomes "den."

Dativ is when the noun is the indirect object. Let's take the following example: I give the man the ball. "Ich gebe DEM Mann den Ball." I am the object, the ball is the direct object (it's what I'm using) and the man is the indirect object (the receiver). Therefore, "der Mann" becomes "dem Mann" in this example. Notice how "der Ball" becomes "den Ball" because it is the direct object.

There are some exceptions to this, and some verbs always use either akkusative or dativ, but the chart above is the basics.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kommusudar

Sie lesen die Zeitung. They are reading the Newspaper. or They reads the Newspaper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

“They reads” is not correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hamza796205

Whats the differnece between "den Apfel" and "die Zeitung"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Whats the differnece between "den Apfel" and "die Zeitung"?

Apfel is an apple -- something to eat.

Zeitung is a newspaper -- something to read.

Completely different meanings.

As for the grammar: Apfel is masculine, Zeitung is feminine.

So in the accusative case, we have den Apfel for "the apple" (masculine accusative den) but die Zeitung for "the newspaper" (feminine accusative die).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisgrcia

Why"die Zeitung" and not "das Zeitung"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why"die Zeitung" and not "das Zeitung"?

Because the word Zeitung is feminine.

das is used before words that are grammatically neuter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/penguingo

There are actually two translations to this: 1) They read the newspaper. They is "sie" (lowercase s), and uses the verb form "lesen." 2) You read the newspaper (formal). The formal way of saying "you" is Sie (yes, with the capital S).

This can never be interpreted as "she reads". Although she also uses "sie" (lowercase s), the verb form would be "liest." Since this uses "lesen," "she reads the newspaper" would be incorrect.

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