https://www.duolingo.com/rach_hickey

Confused...

I was finishing up the common phrase lesson when I was asked to translate "Wir lassen es uns gutgehen", they were all new words except for es, when I typed out the translations it told me; that is "we let it go well ourselves" I was told it in fact meant "We are having a good time" I know you cannot translate word-for-word, but could someone shed a little light on how I go this so wrong?

Thank you Madchris23, getyt and archeg :-)

July 3, 2012

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Madchris23

I think the logic of the sentence is (and someone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong because I'm just making a guess) is that "uns" is taking a dative case, so the sentence, in essence, could translate to, "We are letting ourselves go well" or more "We are letting ourselves have fun" or "We are letting ourselves relax" or something. Anyway, because "uns" is dative, "lassen" needs an accusative noun to work (for here anyway), so it takes "es". That's how I think it works, anyway. I'm probably wrong =P

But that's one of the idiosyncrasies in translating, where you can't translate the sentence on the sum of its words and need to know the meaning behind them.

July 3, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/getyt

ok, it's a bit difficult to translate directly, i think you could almost call it an idiom. "Es geht mir gut." means "I'm fine." The verb in your sentence is: "es sich gut gehen lassen" could be translated word by word to "allow(lassen) yourself(sich) to be(gehen) good/fine(gut)" which sounds a bit strange in english so one would rather translate it to "to have a good time", "to live it up" , you name it. Which makes the translaton of your sentence "we are having a good time".

July 3, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/archeg

I was also confused by this sentence. It looks like this phrase doesn't have a proper word-for-word translation to English, but if you think about this for a while, you'll see that "we let it go well ourselves" and "we are having a good time" have very close meaning. I'm a Russian native speaker, and we have also many such sentences in comparison to English. I guess the only solution is to just remember that stuff.

July 3, 2012
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