"¿Ustedpruebaesteplato?"

Translation:Are you trying this dish?

10 months ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/marg55388

A dish could also be called a plate

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryVande6

By definition plate and dish share this same meaning and either should be accepted. Sources: Merriam Webster dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, Collins Dictionary, Dictionary.com

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrBob3
HerrBob3Plus
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It's how you say it. A better translation that is more colloquial would use the progressive present. "Are you going to try this dish?"

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EDK-Learner
EDK-Learner
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In my experience, we often say "plate" instead of "dish." So, in my humble opinion, "are you trying this plate" should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DamenLucier

Sooo. This might be obvious. But what situation would you say this?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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You're at a party where there's a buffet. The hosts have prepared food from all over the world, and you're wondering what most of it is: ostrich? termites? worms? kangaroo? Your friend asks you: "Are you trying this dish?"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DamenLucier

Ok, that makes sense. I don't know why I was having such a hard time wrapping my head around it. Thank you.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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For me dish is a plate without food when it is full or contain something like a crab it is a plate. I could be wrong

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jlseymour3
jlseymour3Plus
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A dish can refer either to the thing food is served in or on, a plate or a bowl are could collectively be referred to as dishes. But dish can also refer to food that has been prepared in some sense. Plato seems to work for both.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rgonnering

In other lessons, this would be "can you try this dish", but that doesn't work here. BTW, as a native American English speaker, dish makes more sense than plate.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bugatti271449

I don't usually eat plates, but my favorite ones are the paper plates.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RussellWil979620

in my experience -- Australia / England / New Zealand, it's more common to ask "are you going to try..." or "are you interested in trying ..", or "would you like to try..." rather than "are you trying" but who am I to ask -- only been a native English speaker for over 60 years

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

I think "taste" is a better translation. Perhaps I will "try" it next time and see what happens. I've been speaking English for almost 70 years btw.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Panamapal

I agree that "Are you trying this plate?" should be accepted. Expression very commonly used in US.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steven331619

There isn't another word for dish?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miroslav729599

My teeth are not so strong to eat the plate lol.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane276815

Why isn't there an "n" at the end of the verb with ustedes?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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There should be. Was it rejected when you included the n?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunantgarg

"Did you try this dish" was marked wrong on 13 jan 2019

4 days ago
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