"Ellosusualmentequedanalasdiez."

Translation:They usually get together at ten.

10 months ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/aRealSpaceCadet
aRealSpaceCadet
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This doesn't seem right - quedar is to remain, stay, leave behind... Can anyone say if this is correct?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Make sure you are not mixing up quedar and quedarse. It's easy to do. This link provides a nice explanation of the different possible usage and meanings:

https://study.com/academy/lesson/quedar-vs-quedarse.html

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duomylingo69

Thanks for the link!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/quedar

3. (to set a date)

a. to plan to meet

Quedamos en la puerta principal.Let's plan to meet at the front door.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tishgab
tishgab
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Precisely, "meet" should surely be "reuinirse" or "conocer" ?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertoElQuarto

Even more on point from SpanishDict, regarding my "wrong" answer "They usually stay until 10.": Intransitive verb, sense 5, says: "to stay - No me pidas que quede si no vas a volver. - Don't ask me to stay if you are not coming back."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mya397199

Yeah it's incorrect

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

There should be a whole skill dedicated to 'quedar'

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

Well, this is a free course. So, to really understand this, you need to really take the time and study it with a tutor or take a college course. Right now, I am studying "Comprehensive Spanish." I haven't gotten to this part yet, but it is an excellent book, and I am sure it will be covered and explained in detail as to the why.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zaxle
zaxle
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Different applications have different strengths. For the long haul, it is best to practice a little each day with different books and apps. (Unless that gets expensive.)

Also, I agree. Some sort of tutor is indispensable.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tony_oui

No gratis, justo Barato!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetroWestJP
MetroWestJP
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"Quedar(se)" is just the tip of the iceberg, amigo. There are loads of other verbs that mean something different in reflexive form. Here are just 14 of them: https://www.thoughtco.com/verbs-that-change-meaning-in-reflexive-3079894

6 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHandShand

My Spa-Eng dictionary app clearly says, when refering to people, quedar means "to meet". Not sure why DL insists on always using the particular term "get together" but the translation is correct.

Quedarse, the reflexive version, is 'to remain oneself' literally; to stay.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Your dictionary seems to have lost some of the nuance to using quedar. According to RAE, entry #8, it means to arrange a meeting/appointment.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"They usually arrange to meet at ten" is a valid translation. "arrange to meet" was accepted by DL in a similar sentence here. Where is the consistency?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

It's accepted now (9/2018). And I think "arrange to meet" is better than "get together," but they seem to have adopted the latter as the preferred phrasing.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonaldPrid

Is this translation a creation of duolingo?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poguechop

Shouldnt it be "...usualmente se quedan..."? If this is quedarse (to get together) vs quedar (to stay/remain)?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maite654805
Maite654805
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Hello, Poguechop. It would be as you said if those were the correct definitions, but you just mixed them up. There are some examples and more information in other comments that you might find useful.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poguechop

Haha yep. Oops. Realized a couple minutes later but couldn't figure out how to delete my question. Thanks for the clarification anyways. Cheers :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanda755122
Amanda755122
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Is to "quedar" with someone like "to hang out" in English?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarioA.X.T

Quedar means to stay or to remain. Reunirse means to get together. Wrong verb!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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No, one meaning of quedar is to get together.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricTheBiking
EricTheBiking
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Quedar is never used this way in actual speech. Wtf.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

It is used or Duolingo wouldn't be teaching us this. Wouldn't it be nice to first check and see if it something that is actually used or not before making this statement? I'm not Spanish and neither are you. So, let's try to be broadminded and learn this.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mya397199

Actually, this is not the correct way to use 'quedar'

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan

You're right. I've been living in Mexico for five years and I've never heard a native speaker use 'quedar' in this manner (yes, I know it is technically correct, but practical, common usage is more important IMO).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Common usage can vary from region to region. I've heard my sister's Mexican in-laws use quedar like this.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan

Possibly. I have however lived and traveled throughout the country for five years and I’ve never heard ‘quedar’ used this way. That has to mean something.

EDIT: I have just asked several native Spanish speaking friends who have confirmed that it is in fact more common here than I thought. I stand corrected :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Your post is still important. You can speak to native speakers for years and not hear a particular use. That's part of the challenge of learning a language.

I'm glad you shared your experience.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heather16457

We already have another verb to meet/find 'encontrar'. Why do they have to complicate things??

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Because it makes language and life more interesting? To further complicate things encontrar = to find and encontrarse = to meet/get together are two different verbs!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Are you saying that when some Spanish verbs use a reflexive pronoun they are then considered completely different verbs?

Also, can anyone answer if the translation ""Ellos usualmente quedan a las dies" to "They usually remain until ten" is correct. If it's not, I would really like to know why.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maite654805
Maite654805
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Hello, Linda. I'm a Spanish speaker. To your first question, the answer is yes. It is the kind of things that you are not aware of until you read or think about it. "Quedar / quedarse" is a very good example of these different meanings, and you have a lot of information about them at the links above.

'Ellos usualmente quedan a las diez' means that the hour when they meet together / get together is at ten, every day (or every Saturday or whatever the day they meet). [By the way, I've got a question for English speakers: the expression "they get together" sounds correct in English to express that they meet, doesn't it?]

To say that 'They usually remain until ten" you should say "Ellos usualmente se quedan hasta las diez".

You could say, for instance, "Ellos quedan a las diez y se quedan hasta las once'. It means that their meeting hour is at ten and remain until eleven.

I hope this explanation has been useful for you.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh414399

Yes Linda, to get together = to meet in English.
Yes, let's get together! = We'll meet at the café = Let's get together at the café. I think that "let's get together" is more informal. I wouldn't use that expression with a person senior to me for instance.

4 months ago
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