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  5. "A menudo tengo que trabajar …

"A menudo tengo que trabajar los sábados."

Translation:I often have to work on Saturdays.

March 5, 2018

20 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pg9753

Shouldn't "Frequently I have to work on Saturdays" be accepted?

March 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It sounds a bit odd, but it's okay.

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanChase0

It appears to me that I didn't say it exactly the same way and it was marked wrong: I have to work often on Saturdays. Shouldn't that be accepted? If not, why?

September 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Technically, your sentence could be interpreted as "I have to work multiple times on Saturdays", but that take would be a little weird. I think your sentence is a good translation.

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlTrembley

What is the deal with the word QUE in this sentence . It seems unneeded to me .

May 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The que goes with tengo here. If you're talking about an obligation to do something, like in English with "to have to [do something]", you do it in Spanish with the construction "tener que [hacer algo]".

May 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SKBrowne

Why is "que" needed, and why is "A menudo tengo trabajar los sabados" incorrect? Como se dece "I have to work on Saturday" en espanol?

January 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Que is needed in order to make tener function with other verbs:

  • tener - to have, to possess
  • tener que - to have to, to be obliged to

"I have to work on Saturday" would be "Tengo que trabajar el sábado."

January 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruby56531

When to put "a menudo" and other similar adverbs at the beginning and when - at the end of a sentence?

June 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Adverbs of time usually sound better when they're in front of the verb. But if it's more of an afterthought, you can also place them at the end.

June 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joydeepbha7

Is 'sometimes' incorrect to use here, in the answer frequently used

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"A menudo" is usually translated as "often" or "frequently", something that happens more often than just "sometimes". "Sometimes" is usually expressed as "a veces".

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karate007

Why is QUE needed before trabajar

August 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The que goes with the tengo. If you want to say that you "have to do something", an obligation, you put a que between tener and the main verb: "tener que hacer algo".

August 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artiealf

sorry, we don't really say that. We say, I often have to work on Saturday. I guess this translation is technically grammatical, but we just don't say that.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It depends on what "we" you're talking about. For me (something something general British English), "on Saturdays" sounds quite good.

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artiealf

That's interesting. We certainly do speak English differently in different places, just as they speak Spanish differently in different places.

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mizztraveller

As tengo means have (have to) and trabajar means to work, why is there need for 'que'

October 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The que is there to make the tener interact with the trabajar.

Whenever you're using tener to talk about an obligation (as in "have to do something" in English), you need to place a que between tener and the other verb. Tener without que is only used to talk about possession.

October 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mizztraveller

Thank you. I think Duolingo confuse the issue. When the Spanish words are at the top of the page and you hover over them for a translation, 'tener' says 'to have/have to'.

October 10, 2019
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