https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB

What Was It Like, When You Began Learning Languages?

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Do you remember what it was like, when you began to learn your first foreign language? I certainly do, and yet I still have to remind myself at times in order to remember how far I have come. Whenever I feel as if I am just not good enough, I try to see the long road behind me…and not just the long road ahead of me. I think that it is just as important to see from where you came as to see where you are going. It encourages us when we feel as if we can never do enough, or at least never do enough right.


So, here is my Spanish story:

I began to learn Spanish at the age of ten or eleven, and yet I had to learn the same material over and over again as the years passed. So, then I was a teenager who should have had far more speaking skills and knowledge than I did. It stayed like this for a long while. Then, one day, actually one week….there were many things that came together. I saw people my age speaking Spanish fluently, and knew that I couldn’t talk with them (and I should have been able to at that point). Also, I saw the famous Timothy Doner video. In fact, polyglots had always been objects of extraordinary admiration for me. I had never really made the connection that I could make the steps to try at it myself.

Then what?

I began to pick up Spanish, with dedication, as I never had before. I studied like mad, so much that I woke up multiple times during the night, tormented with pictures of verb conjugations. Everything was Spanish. I stuck Spanish labels all over everything I had until I learned the words. I talked to myself in Spanish and disturbed my pets with it. I reprimanded strangers in Spanish when driving, all of those things. The years went by in this way, and it felt as a single day. Then I decided to join Duolingo. I worked my way up in this fashion, strengthening verbs and all of the things with which I had struggled at other times.

To tell a long story short, I completed the Spanish tree in December of last year. I am still working at Spanish….and I decided to start Russian at some indefinite point about a year ago.


What are my end goals? I want to speak Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian; Russian, Ukrainian, and Polish; German, Dutch, and Afrikaans. Combined with English, that total is ten. I would like to know much more, but this is what I know is possible for me.

What was it like to begin your first foreign language? What are your long-term goals?

11 months ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OmegaGmaster
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It all started with me learning Mandarin Chinese. Well, actually, Korean. My passion for foreign languages started in the bathroom of my grandmother's house, where I grew intrigued by some tissues she had that were written in Korean. I spent the day using an IME to type that Korean into Google Translate and I grew intrigued. A few weeks, I set out to learn the Korean alphabet. At the time I was 11-12 and found it quite a struggle. After learning the alphabet, I started to pursue the language.

I stopped at some point because my parents urged me to learn Mandarin Chinese. So I did. And it went really well. Today I'm fluent in the language.

In the later years of my Chinese studies I encountered many other beautiful languages that I wanted to learn. I had then laid out a language plan then (I was in middle school):

  • Learn Russian in 9th grade
  • Learn Arabic in 10th grade
  • Learn Hindi/Urdu in 11th grade
  • Learn Tamil in 12th grade
  • Learn other languages (Turkish, Thai, Japanese, and some more) during college years

During the summer of the year I made that plan, the plan fell apart. Because I discovered so many other beautiful languages and I instantly fell in love with them. I started learning about all of them.

9th grade was my biggest growth year by far. It was that year I discovered and fell in love wih the Turkic languages as well as the languages of the Caucasus, especially Circassian, Ossetian, Georgian, and Abkhaz. I was so deeply fascinated.

Unfortunately, 9th grade was also the start of my current downfall in terms of my relationship with my parents as well as my emotions in general. They noticed me dabbling in all these """"useless"""" languages and told me to stop and learn more Spanish (to the same level as my English). Naturally I didn't listen. That's still one of the root causes of my downfall today.

It was also during that year that I was grounded from all the games and sites I used to access. It was for saucy but questionable reasons, which I won't elaborate on here. (It had nothing to do with language) That event was one of the reasons I fell in love with so many languages; since my time couldn't be spent playing games or talking to friends, I spent it reading and learning about languages. So, in a way, they made me from angering them in one way to angering them in another. It's gone bonkers though. I'm still grounded today, but I have a bit more freedom (i.e. able to access Internet to some degree). It was also the start of my depression, as I realized my parents wouldn't support me one way or the other. (The original path I was on was on game development, which I still want to do).

That's how my 9th grade summer went also. However it wasn't as fun. I didn't have any access to the Internet at the time. So my studies went on a hiatus for the whole 3 months.

This year also got to a shaky start but I can definitely say it's been a tiny bit better. For one, I took and passed a Chinese proficiency exam. However ever since that exam, my parent's attitude on me learning foreign languages has grown even worse for some reason. I decided to take Korean 1 and Chinese 3 next year and dropping Spanish, but they're trying to get me to kick out Korean 1 and pursue AP Spanish, which I cannot do if I wish to remain sane. Nowadays they usually try and harass me by playing Spanish radio only in the car, which isn't very effective, as I can very often understand what's being said in talk shows and songs.

The funny thing about my parents is, despite how much they want me to pursue Spanish, they almost never speak it to me in the house or car. In fact, the last time I heard them speak it directly to me was when they were trying to harass me from not understanding what they were saying in Spanish. smh

They're also on my tail as I learned about just how pointless and stupid the American education system is. I began questioning why I was in school to begin with. My grades """"tanked"""" (they went from A's and B's to B's and C's) but in my parents' eyes it was as bad and significant as the massive cryptocurrency dip of last month.

Ever since the start of 2018 I've been in a language learning hiatus for the reasons I described above. At this point I'm worried I will end up never ending it and my passion will completely die.

So, my language goals? I want to have significant knowledge in Korean, Japanese, Russian, Esperanto, Turkish, Swedish, Polish, Hungarian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Greek, Welsh, Hebrew, Danish, Italian, French, Catalan, Georgian, Abkhaz, Ossetian, Azerbaijani, Kazakh, Armenian, Iranian and Tajiki Persian, Turkmen, Kyrgyz, Uyghur, Circassian, Tibetan, Sakha, Finnish, Mongolian, Pashto, Hindi, Urdu, Arabic (MSA and Egyptian), Bengali, Telugu, Vietnamese, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Quechua, and Tatar.

In other words, a minority Tim Doner on steroids. ("Minority" can be interpreted in two ways as I'm a Bolivian learning minority languages.)

What I really want is peace on Earth. And I believe language is the gateway to that.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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I love your ambition!! "Props" to you. Do not let it die! You have come too far to have only come this far, right?

When I first showed interest in Russian, all I can say is that no one was jumping for joy. I just got, "oh..." It was kind of disappointing, really. And discouraging...my family didn't take that seriously until I started buying so many books (also, most of them grew up in the Cold War when no one really learned it). Now, on the other hand, a few mutual friends I met seemed impressed when they asked what I like to do and I said I learned Russian. But still, this air of 'you're not going to stick with that, it's too hard' (to which I began to think, well, is that true or are you just the type to give up on something like that??). Anyway, I started actually being able to speak some, and they saw how much it took to get to that point, and so from there they began to give more support. Still, no one is really interested but I don't care. I just keep it for here most of the time and let articles feed my enthusiasm rather than people.

So don't be daunted. You have the time, the brain power, the resources, and the support here that you need. Trudge on, loyal soldier:).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngraner42
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My first atempt at French nearly 35 years ago went like this. I took French as a foreign language requirement to graduate and I took it pass\fail. I barely passed by a combination of easy grading and tricks like memorizing the standard verb conjugation and using it for everything and doing fill in the blanks by - it looks like a noun is needed here, this word is a noun, I'll just try it.

Ok, so when I really started to learn French it was on Duolingo a year ago February. I remember doing it more by feel than knowledge. It would be like this multiple choice answer seems good and I wouldn't even read the other ones. I would translate something and be surprised I got it right. The English to French was usually, see the answer and try to remember it for when it comes up next.

Now I can read passably without a dictionary and not so bad with one. Listening is still hopeless. I can follow along with mayby 50% understanding with subtitles.

Goal: To be able to listen to French and have it seem as transparent as English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEeveeLord

Pretty late, but here you go:

I've been in Jewish private school for most of my life, all of which have Hebrew as a required subject. However, from 1st-5th grade, I didn't learn any Hebrew (I blamed it on the script for the most part). I knew the alphabet and some very basic words (water, land, sun, numbers 1-10 etc.), but that was it. Because Jewish schools use Hebrew for so many other classes (Bible, Jewish Law, etc.) to translate from the original text, I really wasn't doing too well in those classes. So I went to public school at the start of middle school.

Like most public middle schools in the US, Spanish was a subject. I was kinda excited. Since Spanish used the Latin script like English, I thought I stood a chance. However, I was disappointed when instead of Spanish I was placed in a class to improve writing skills. I did get over it quickly, though. Little did I know, however, that was really the start of my passion for languages, as I realized that I was excited to learn a language.

During 8th grade and the summer afterwards, my interest in learning a language was reignited, but I don't think it was triggered by anything. It was kinda spontaneous (actually it might have been a Rosetta Stone commercial. Kudos, Rosetta Stone marketing team, you successfully convinced me to learn languages). I looked up things having to do with language but found nothing useful. I knew about Rosetta Stone (as mentioned previously), but it was waaay out of my budget (that budget being exactly $0). However, I would soon be given a new opportunity, as I was going to another Jewish private school for high school. They had a program for teaching Hebrew from the basics (as they got a lot of students with no Jewish schooling background), and during the placement tests over the summer, they allowed me to choose another language from Spanish, French, and Latin. I chose French because I was fond of Quebec. However, I was again placed in a class for improving writing skills, and though I still had Hebrew, it was a bummer. It was then that I learned about Duolingo from a friend. After looking at the options, I decided on Italian. However, since it was the first time I tried learning a language I was ignorant about things like grammatical gender and verb conjugation, and quit Duolingo altogether after a few weeks.

When school started, I began learning Hebrew and discovered that I could actually do it. For the first time, I was actually successfully learning a language. However, I took very little notes, and though I had a good memory and remembered most of what I learned, that didn't last forever (but more on that later). Later that year, I heard that Duolingo released Swedish, and since I liked Sweden I decided to learn it. I was doing pretty well, too. It was then that languages became my hobby.

However, I liked learning languages, not the languages I was learning. When Swedish prepositions frustrated me, I switched to Portuguese, only to quit since I could never remember the verb conjugations. I then went to Danish, Dutch, French, Russian, German, and a few others, but none of them I learned for long.

In my sophomore year, I saw a Duolingo forum post suggesting how Duolingo could implement features to aid the instruction of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean (which at the time were not in the Incubator). Reading through it made me interested in learning one of those languages. After doing some basic research, I settled on Japanese. The dynamic nature of Japan intrigued me, so I scoured the web for resources. I eventually found a website very similar to the famous italki, and found a tutor. After a few lessons, I started to fall in love with the language and culture. I knew that Japanese was the language for me.

After a handful of Japanese lessons, I made a shocking revelation: flashcards are important. In response, I made flashcards from the Japanese textbook PDFs my tutor sent me. However, as my focus shifted to Japanese, my Hebrew suffered. Given that it was already sophomore year and I had little notes, it was not really possible to make flashcards. I still did well on quizzes and tests, but I couldn't really have a conversation with anyone. As time went on, my passion for Japanese and my skills at the language grew, but my ability to actually use Hebrew declined.

I'm going to college soon, and will definitely major in Japanese, and I plan to move to Japan after college. Probably 90% of the television and music I consume these days are Japanese. It's something that has completely dominated my life, and though I have tried to learn other languages, none of them have ever appealed to me as much as Japanese.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Thank you for sharing your story!!:)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEeveeLord

No problem!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MyaRexa
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I honestly don't remember the times when I wasn't learning a language... I started English in kindergarten, so it's been with me practically my whole life. Then German at school and later also French, self-learning basics of Russian before I discovered Duo. Back then, I already had plans to learn many languages.

And the, I found Duo - and the hell broke loose ;) I finally found a way to learn Japanese, and Chinese soon followed, as did many other languages. Esperanto's course, which I finished, and others that I've started.

To sum it up; I'm fluent in 2 languages: Polish and English.
I'd like to speak at at least upper basic/intermediate level: Japanese, Mandarin, German, French, Russian, Spanish, Portuguese, Esperanto, Arabic, Hindi, and possibly Turkish, Korean, Latin, Modern Greek, Italian and one (or more) Scandiavian languages.

For some of those, I already know the basics, but I'm not stopping there. Others, like Arabic and Hindi (those will be the most difficult for me), I haven't started yet. Thai and Tagalog seem interesting to me too, but I don't think I can manage that many languages, so choices will need to be made ;)

To count it: my minimum number is 11-12, but it could go as high as 19-23, if I ever found time for all of those languages. And if I get sidetracked and pick up even more... Irish, Romanian, Finnish, Hungarian (those are a bit less possible for me)... who knows ^.^

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Your English is seamless...I would have never known if I hadn't found out last month:).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MyaRexa
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Thank you again, сестра! :) There's never enough of improvement though... all those dialects (London's cockney and many others)... and the casual phrases I pick up daily ;) It's amazing how a language evolves!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SLeason

what's your native language? Polish?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MyaRexa
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Yes ;) but nowadays, although I live in Poland, I use English more - the forums, language learning, taking notes, watching movies.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D3act1vat3d_Us3r

Well good for you on learning Spanish! My long-term goal is to complete my Spanish tree, and MAYBE High Valyrian if I feel spunky.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirstinGraeper

I haven't even gotten close to learning an entire language, but my long-term goals are to become fluent in Norwegian so I can visit my cousins there. I was pushed into learning the language before a big trip to Norway for the first time and haven't stopped trying to learn since.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ViiDesigns

Wow I can so relate to your Spanish journey! I'm was first taught Spanish because my parents were native speakers, then I needed to be switched over to English in order to understand my pre-school teachers and only retained a few words here and there, I could always understand it more than I could speak it. I had Spanish classes in grammar school (where it wasn't taught very well) and took 2 spanish courses in college (intermediate and advanced). Now I'm at that slippery slope of forgetting words again, I recently spoke with my grandmother who only speaks Spanish and I was shocked at how much I'd forgotten.

Now I'm trying to re-commit to learning it (plus learning other languages), I have my book from the last class I took and now duolingo, so here's hoping I can maintain my streak!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Good luck to you in your Spanish journey! I wish you all the best. Buena suerte!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brass_phoenix
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Heh, I remember my first day of french very well. My teacher decided to give us a beginning of the year 'pre-test'. I guess it was so that during our senior year she could show us how far we had come, but I remember little twelve year old me staring blankly at french bicycle advertisements, and cafe menus. It freaked me out.

I have been studying French for so long, and I am not very good at it. One of my new year's resolutions was to improve my French, but I suck at keeping resolutions ( as you can see by my current streak.)

Happy language learning!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
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I remember that officially, my first foreign language was Greek, ancient specifically I think (I remember asking my mom if I was studying Greek people was speaking in our times but I can't remember for the life of me what textbook was used.) I never got further than the alphabet and I got demotivated after a while of trying because I didn't think the kind of Greek I was learning would be useful. But the first foreign language I actually learned enough to form sentences was Japanese (still very simple sentences). I love learning Japanese despite the challenges when I was 12 and I still do to this day. My first successful language was Spanish, which I started learning in my early teens and now that I'm a little older (I literally finished high school last year), I use it whenever possible. I adore Spanish and it gave me the confidence that I can learn other languages. And now I'm picking up phrases whenever I can.

My long-term goal (which I may achieve by the age of 60 or 75) is to be fluent or advanced in at least 15 languages other than English. I'd like those languages to be Spanish, Arabic, Greek, Korean, Japanese, Turkish, Welsh, Swedish, Italian, Mandarin, Mongolian, Swahili, Czech, Thai and Zulu. I know I can't realistically be fluent in more than that but I'd like to at least have working capabilities in other languages (meaning I can form sentences with them).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Very interesting, DragonPolyglot! I hope you get your language dreams. You'll be as a language superhero, I think!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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Formatting tip:
If you add two blanks " " to the end of the current line (after the "." dot), you will create a new line without an empty line / paragraph.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gothicsquirrel
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I started learning French at school aged 11 and I really enjoyed it and got on well. A couple of years later we had an appalling teacher who spent most of the class playing 'lotto' because the majority of the class refused to do anythng else and she had no discipline. I was scared that I would lose al the progress I had made so I started reading everything I could get my hands on (not much in a pre-internet age!) and I translated everything I read into French - it didn't matter so much if I got it wrong, as I had no way of knowing what was right or wrong, but at least I was practising and learning word.

The upshot of that apporach was that I ended up with a huge vocabulory compared with my friends, but I was not particularly strong on grammar, and my listening and speaking skills were way behind my reading/writing.

The vocab has largely stayed with me, but when I joined Duo I started the French course to try to bring the other skills up to scratch. I'm getting there slowly.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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A quick writing (typing = RECALLING) tip:

If you take the reverse tree French-English (from French) / French-German (from French) you will be able to practice writing in French (your original target language) on a much higher ratio.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gothicsquirrel
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Thank you :)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diecidieci
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I started to learn English when I was 9 and I hated it. I'm horrible at learning languages in classrooms (especially if I have no motivation to learn the language) but I picked up English fairly fast when I began to use the internet (there aren't that many good sites in my native language). So now that I'm trying to learn Italian I try to use the language as much as I can --- online and offline.

I've also studied Swedish (for 7 years) and Spanish (for 3 yrs) but I've forgotten most of them. I'd love to learn them again but I think it's better if I only concentrate on Italian first. I'd also like to learn the basics of Russian one day, but who knows if I'll have the needed patience for such a difficult language...

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Russian is great. Don't be scared off by how hard everyone says it is. Difficulty varies greatly by person; you never know! Anyway, it's great to hear that you have successfully picked up at least a bit of what you love. Best of luck to you in your language journey!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diecidieci
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Well, I spent a couple of months in Russia last year and it took me weeks to learn how to pronounce "hello" (здра́вствуйте) semi-properly... So I don't think Russian would be an easy language for me. But I'd love to learn it anyway, it would open me so many doors in life. Thank you, right back at you!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMira_
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Oh that's a good list! This is a great post! ;)

Okay, so I started learning French because my best friends' mom wanted to teach us (she has a major in French Literature), so I started learning when I was pretty young, about 4 - 5 years ago, on a different account (I forgot the username... and the password.. so... I figured "Oh I'll just make a new one" lol) but I quickly kinda stopped, just because I wasn't really serious about it, and when my French teacher taught us it would be at like... BEST once a month, so I quickly stopped.

Two years ago I picked up sign language, and started teaching myself mostly online, until we found a really good cheap class near us last summer. I was like, almost fluent vocabulary wise, but like NOT at all grammar wise. I've been continuing to take classes there, and I'm in ASL 3.

Just a year ago my French teacher got serious about teaching classes again, and I've been doing that sorta once a week since (it's a little complicated...) and I've been trying to use duolingo along with the other website she's using to teach us too.

This year, back in September (or I guess it's last year.. by now...) I got into K-pop, and loooveee it to death still, and has been a major part of my incentive to learn Korean. Basically when I got into K-pop the Korean course had just come out of Beta. I started on Duolingo... then quickly learned the course was waaayyy to hard/unfinished to actually learn how to speak Korean any. I could read a little, but speaking was just so hard and I was living off of hovering-over-the-word, so I switched to Lingodeer for that, and still am using it happily.

So my learning resources for my 3 languages I'm learning are: French on Duolingo and in class sorta, Korean on Lingodeer, and ASL in class. I'm mostly fluent in ASL, getting better in French, and not really fluent at all in Korean. However I can say "Hello, my name is ____" in all 3.

All of my friends are like super supportive when it comes to ASL and French, and then are like "Oh she can't choose a language" when I said I was learning Korean lollll... My long term language goal is to be able to empathize and communicate on a deep level with someone in at least 3 languages. I don't want to be a therapist, but I think that part of the reason we learn languages is so we can communicate with each other, and be kind to one another, not so we can harass more people, right?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Hi Mira!! Thank you so much for commenting:). I enjoyed reading your experience. I'm sure that with commitment, no goal is unreachabke for you and everyone else here!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karlsenski
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It started with me trying to learn French here on Duolingo. I ended up giving up on that after 3 days because the listening exercises were hard. So then I switched to German. I can't remember what caused me to keep learning it but I just never gave up on it. I was very proud of myself when I could form sentences like "Das Mädchen trinkt Wasser", and then later on when I could read a German text and actually kind-of understand it. It's very cool to do anything in another language when you've been monolingual for your entire life. Learning German eventually developed into a general interest in linguistics, as I began to learn more languages.

My long term language goals are: German, French, Russian, Yiddish, and maybe Japanese or Mandarin.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SLeason

Well I'm not very advanced, but I've been on for Duo for 1 year and 2 months. So I started Duolingo learning Portuguese, but I didn't really get into it. I stopped learning that, then started learning French. I didn't really like that either. But when I started German, it was like I found a true language that fit me for who I was. I fell in love, you could say. I worked on it for about 6 months and for about a month I stopped completely. But then I heard someone younger than I was rapping in Fluent German. I was inspired and I came back. Now I'm working on a 100 day streak and also started learning Danish. I guess you never know just how much you love and language until you leave it. =)

My long term goals are to get to level 20 in German and 15 in Danish in (hopefully) another year.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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I guess you never know just how much you love and language until you leave it. =)

Exactly! I'm glad you have found a language that "speaks" to you. Little kids who have already accomplished that for which you are striving so diligently....that is always a good motivation...:)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SLeason

I agree

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
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Well, I don’t think learning English really counts, as I was four when I moved to Canada and picked it up naturally, by osmosis. I have an early memory of preschool and someone holding up coloured lego type blocks and naming colours, but that is it. I must have picked it up in a few months, just from going to kindergarden and watching t.v.

I went to a french immersion school from grade 7 and most of high school. All our subjects (with the exception of English class and gym) were taught in french. I went to french immersion because my friends were going, and school was pretty easy so it seemed like a fun extra challenge. I also took Hebrew lessons during most of my childhood. Honestly it was pretty casual, and I had fun with my friends, but I don’t think I would have chosen to do so, if my parents hadn’t insisted upon it. Still, it was fun and our Hebrew teacher was always a cool young person from Israel... so it was sort of like a fun after school club.

In high school I stoped taking french in my last few years and do regret that. I also regret not making more of an effort to communicate in french with french speaking roomates when I had the chance.

I started doing duolingo on the recommendation of a friend. At the time I also tried a few brain training apps, amd it seemed like a better way to train my brain and actually learn something. Duolingo is pretty addictive. Actually, to be honest.. I don’t have any language goals. I do like Spanish poetry and would like to read it in the original. I like learning because I feel like I am keeping my mind active, but aside from that, I have no particular plans to ‘use’ any language I am learning. That said, I admire people like you Lauriana and others who are so passionate about learning.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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Formatting tip:
You can press the ENTER hot key twice to build a paragraph and an empty newline.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
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I didn’t notice I had written such a wall of text before seeing your comment, Thomas. I will try to be more attentive to formatting next time. Thanks.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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No problem Silvia.
It's mostly just me who seems to have sometimes problems with reading longer texts which fill multiple lines in a single block - not everyone has the same difficulties. Dunno why.


This is the GOOD thing about the current DuoLingo forum software:

You can EDIT your own comment, whenever you like to do that. There is no time limit when it get's disabled.

Just be a little bit careful with your EDIT:

The "forum maintenance update" from October 2017 introduced MANY bugs.

One of them is that you constantly overwrite your new edited comment with old text versions, when you twice / triple... edit your own comment WITHOUT a complete thread reload (F5 refresh) before.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
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Thomas, it’s not just you. You are the second person today that has pointed out to me the importance of paragraphs and formating. I will definately pay more attention to this from now on.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Silvia, where were you from originally? And I knew it! I just knew you were from Canada! Maybe it was the spelling of something...anyway...

Thank you:).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
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Ah, yes... colour is a givaway. (Now if duolingo would stop ‘correcting’ me on it). I was born in (the former) Czechoslovakia, now Slovakia.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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How very neat! A beautiful part of the world:).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/millie_01

I love the Spanish language but I am only just starting out so i think I’m going to be here a while.. x

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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Hi Lauriana,

why do you want to be able to speak Afrikaans? Where?

Do you think you could use it in Kapstadt better than English? https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapstadt#Sprachen

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Okay, good question, here's the reason: Afrikaans is one of the closest language relatives to English, and also to Dutch and German. If you can see, I have strategic groups based on the languages I already know...Ukrainian and Polish (Russian), Portuguese and Italian (Spanish), Dutch and German and Afrikaans (English).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoapyBoatman

I took Latin at my school for seven years and it never clicked. I just wanna be semi-fluent in a language that's actually useful.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keikou_
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I started learning English 5-6 years ago (I was like 8-9) when I found this particular computer game: Animal Jam. (You might have heard of it) I immediately fell in love with it lol It didn't have German servers at the time so I had to use the English ones; I couldn't understand ❤❤❤❤ and that really frustrated me. So I Google-translated every single word and stammered ''I not English'' in the chat for quite a while. After a few months I started to also like English in school (they started teaching it us in 3rd grade) because I finally understood something. 3 years later I started to also play (and become addicted to)Transformice and watch Youtube videos. In total I've probably watched like 30k videos, over 50% English ones. Today I am conversational and get only A's in essays at school :3

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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Why only Polish? Why not Czech?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurianaB
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Though I have a high likelihood of learning Czech later, like I said those were my base goals...Polish and Ukrainian are enough like each other and Russian that they really click for me. I will be very capable, I'm sure, after so much knowledge of the ones I mentioned, to quickly pick up many others. :) So not only Polish, or Italian, or Dutch....I will start whatever I feel drawn to after after I complete what is most important to me.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lezuardi
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My first foreign language is English because here we learned it since kindergarten. No, that doesn't make a good story.

When we were cleaning the reading room when I was 8, I found my father's Kanji dictionary. From the curiosity of the strange letters, I started to learn Japanese. At first my father taught me the basics, then I took courses. The next year I took the JLPT N5 and passed. However, since then I took a bit of hiatus from Japanese, though still learning it slowly.

At 7th grade, I took a French course. I don't even remember why I wanted to learn French that time. I studied French for three years, and for that much time I struggled to pass JLPT N4 since I have to divide time for French, Arabic (only for a short time), Japanese, and school lessons.

At highschool, I started to learn Japanese again more seriously. Last year, I passed N3. Since there is a German subject here and I got good notes, I was chosen to take the A1 (and this year I'll take A2) intensive class. By the time I enter highschool I found Duolingo. At first I only use it to review French and practice German, but then I added more and more languages as you can see.

My language goals right now are Japanese N2, German A2, Javanese, Arabic, Mandarin, Vietnamese, Hungarian, Norwegian, Tagalog, Hindi, Korean, and maybe Thai.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedheadedRogue

~super late reply that no one might read but~

I started learning Latin years ago, when I was in middle school or thereabouts, through a little class that taught from the Cambridge books. (They're awesome, by the way, if anyone here wants to learn Latin.) I didn't have long in that class before we moved, but I loved learning it so much for the next year I struggled along by myself and almost managed to finish the first book.

The year after, we found another class that taught Cambridge Latin with an extremely smart, enthusiastic teacher - the only catch was that the class as a whole was almost an entire book ahead of me, and some of them had been learning for years before that. I still remember how intimidated I was when my first day there happened to be the day they were handing out medals for that year's National Latin Exam! I had so many basic concepts to re-learn, concepts that everyone else had already mastered, that I nearly gave up. But I studied harder than just about anyone else in the class, out of pure love of the language, and finally caught up to the rest of my classmates in about a year. One of the proudest days of my life was when I passed the National Latin Exam summa cum laude. ^^

Anyway, the reason I've posted such a late reply is that so many people shy away from learning Latin because they think it's too hard, or because they think learning a dead language won't do them any good. Believe me, it will - even if you aren't really into ancient history or old epics like the Aeneid, Latin is the base of so many other languages. I could understand a good deal of text written in any of many current languages (Spanish, French, Italian) even before learning them, and now that I'm actually studying them in earnest the conjugations and declensions are practically a breeze.

As for its being hard, that's true enough. But it's no great obstacle if you really love languages, and its benefits will follow you all your life.

11 months ago
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