"A veces yo estoy enojado con mi padre."

Translation:Sometimes I am angry at my father.

8 months ago

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DamenLucier

"At times, I am angry with my father." seems a little more straight forward to me.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nissou452570

Yes, I'm looking what happen with duelango English

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ex3mity
Ex3mity
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They should remove "at"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StikbotCha

So "Sometimes I angry my father"? That does not sound right.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaylorCunn12

Did you forget the "estoy" and "con"? Before you complain, check that you are right.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaylorCunn12

If they remove at: Sometimes I am angry my father.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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I think the person meant to remove “at” and use “with” instead?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madison358260

I said " I am sometimes angry with my father" That should be accepted. Reported 5/22/18

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roy685800
Roy685800
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Accepted 18/7/18

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie271319

Not accepted 9/16/18. "Con" means "with". Reported.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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What was your entire sentence because “with” is accepted as correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelSchmoo

"Sometimes I am angry with my father" was wrong for me

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Please report it as also correct, but first double check that it was not the multiple choice with more than one correct answer, because then it is wrong unless you choose all correct answers and also it cannot be the Listen to Spanish and write what you hear...in Spanish.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert338583

"Con" can mean more than just "with", depending on how the word is used in a sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charmy_

I answered "Sometimes I am mad with my father" and was marked incorrect (10/11/18)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Yes, the original two answers use “mad at” or “angry with” and “angry at” was added, so you can try reporting this version to see if it will also be added as an alternative correct answer.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtOfFHP

Charmy, I consider "mad at" or "mad with" to be slang, I'm afraid.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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The dictionaries consider it informal, but not slang: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/mad

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PetersenTur

you're salty

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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I agree with the previous posters. 'Angry with...' makes more sense.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarlLeonha1

to be angry with somebody, not at somebody!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AeF9FWYe

If we can be "mad at" someone, can't we also be "angry at" someone? Is this person angry "at" the father, or is the father angry and this person is angry along "with" him? Without context, "with" and "at" are both valid.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JH959
JH959
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The Oxford dictionary lists the term "mad at" as informal and gives examples where it can be used with both prepositions _ "with" or "at". But just because you can say "mad at", it doesn't necessarily follow that "angry at" is correct. Replace "angry" with "happy" and it's clear that it's not right. Happy at my father? Don't think so. Happy with or happy for, depending on context. For what it's worth, my opinion is that "angry with" is if not more correct, then definitely more commonly used than "angry at".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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In the USA, it has become acceptable to use “angry at” though “angry with” continues to be slightly more common. To me “at” sounds more aggressive. I wouldn’t say it about my father, but maybe if I were really angry with my brother.... No, I am really rather a pacifist. We must keep on reporting it. https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/43671/angry-with-vs-angry-at-vs-angry-on

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mongkingco

Why is it "yo estoy"? Shouldn't 'yo' be omitted because estoy refers to yourself anyway?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffgoDai

It can be, but it doesn't have to be.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie271319

Yes, both are accepted. Yo estoy is redundant. Estoy is sufficient, and is very often accepted in duo lingo, as well it should be. Ask any of you Spanish speaking friends or co workers and they will tell you the same thing.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eldorado686677

I hope you work it out soon.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosRossi2

Q for the group. Should not a female speaker be "enojada" and not "enojado"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robert.bowman
robert.bowman
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I don't know why anyone voted this question down. I came here with the exact same thought. I suspect this was just an oversight, and that, indeed, a female speaker should use "enojada" to describe themselves. It's just that this wouldn't prevent a speech synthesizer of any gender from saying exactly what you tell it to say, even if it isn't correctly paying attention to gender agreement. I think this is all that's happened here. I might be incorrect, but I think I've seen this addressed in other discussions, and some comments noted that occasionally they missed some of these. Hope this helps!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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You are correct, each voice says every sentence regardless of gender. So. we have to pay attention to what was said and not by which synthesizer voice. Sometimes one voice is clearer than the other and other times it is the opposite, so they continue to use both.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Josrossi2, try thinking of it this way: what if a woman Spanish teacher needs to teach you the Star Wars sentence, *Luke, I am your father." The voice of the teacher does not matter in the learning of putting a sentence together at all.

Funny little sentences used to be in the older version of the app (before the change to crown system) that said things like "I am a penquin," but I'm sure the teacher did not have to go get a penguin to do the speaking!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lacanterie

Angry with my father is correct english in this context

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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It is now accepted as correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

Not good English to say "angry at", it should be angry with. DL please note!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtOfFHP

@brackenwood3: "angry at" is not bad English, just not a great translation from DuoLingo. "yo estoy enojado con" = "I am angry with" rather than "I am angry at". Likewise, general English usage is "angry WITH" people, but "angry AT" everything else. Not an absolute rule, but, e.g., "I am angry with my father" versus "I am angry at the weather".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dendoc49

I agree with DamenLucier

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caroline237678

Jaja, a veces...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlueBlazar
BlueBlazar
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I just said every word correctly and it still marked it wrong. Is this a common bug?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Hard for us to know if you said every word correctly, because we didn't hear you. That being said pronunciation is difficult yet there is also the possibility of something not working with the microphone or the program that "hears" you.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stinkstonk

Please................ I am angry with my father

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Did you put “sometimes” ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amber705564

¿A veces o siempre? (Mi vida)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StikbotCha

Papa = Dad. Padre = Father.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skfarouk

This is getting Freudian

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DouglasDod10

"At my father " is not a good translation. Better English would be "with my father. "

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Not enough information, “Sometimes I am angry with my father.” is also accepted as correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinBedward

Tricky one. As an English speaker, I think normally we'd say '..angry with my' - but on reflection, I do find '...angry 'at'_' as being more contextually correct. Who am I angry at? 'With' perhaps suggesting you are both angry.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Well that is the difference between “talking with” (two-way conversation) and “talking to”. “Angry with” was the original version and the Oxford dictionary does not show any examples for “angry at”. In America “mad at” is another popular expression and over time “angry at” has come to also be accepted though it was originally considered wrong.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sidney369633

This is true duo lady!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tuqa88344

At my father! It should be with.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“Angry with” should also be accepted as correct. Did you report it?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

Why not"annoyed with"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thesummerdancer

I thought con meant with, not at! Confused

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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In Spanish it is always “con” with enojado, but in English you can say “angry with” or “mad at” and over time “angry at” and “mad with” have also come to be accepted.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eysan629

Is ''Estoy enojado con su'' suitable too?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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“mi” means “my”, so “su” could not be used for this particular sentence since it means “his”, “her”, “your” (for usted or ustedes), or “their”.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mohankumar810386

Duolingo spied on me

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eysan629

I think ''mad'' would be more suitable rather than ''angry''.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Mad is not more suitable than angry. Both should be accepted as correct.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenThackra

agreed

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa386735

I said sometimes I get mad at my dad. Why would that be marked wrong?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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"dad" is "papá"

"father" is "padre"

“Get mad” means “become mad” which is not correct, though “Sometimes I am mad at my father.” is correct.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rising_pets

t6

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffgoDai

No one seems to know how to reply, so I'll start my own chain. "Angry with my father" Is similar, but not accepted in Spanish. It would be "Enojado con mi papa", which can have different meanings. Spanish has different grammar, so it doesn't work.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CajunCoding
CajunCoding
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Maybe the literal translation is "angry at" but it's at least more grammatically common, if not exclusively correct, to be "angry with" in English.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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No, the literal translation is "angry with" and now both are accepted. "con" means "with".

2 months ago
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