"A veces yo estoy enojado con mi padre."

Translation:Sometimes I am angry at my father.

March 8, 2018

148 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madison358260

I said " I am sometimes angry with my father" That should be accepted. Reported 5/22/18

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie271319

Not accepted 9/16/18. "Con" means "with". Reported.

September 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charmy_

I answered "Sometimes I am mad with my father" and was marked incorrect (10/11/18)

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, the original two answers use “mad at” or “angry with” and “angry at” was added, so you can try reporting this version to see if it will also be added as an alternative correct answer. I have never personally heard this version though. Where is this commonly said?

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

I'm accustomed to hearing "angry with" as well as "angry at". Also "mad at", but I've never heard "mad with".

Then, of course, there's "mad about", but that can be used to mean angry about something or having a crush on or being in love with someone.

August 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlLeonha1

to be angry with somebody, not at somebody!

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AeF9FWYe

If we can be "mad at" someone, can't we also be "angry at" someone? Is this person angry "at" the father, or is the father angry and this person is angry along "with" him? Without context, "with" and "at" are both valid.

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JH959

The Oxford dictionary lists the term "mad at" as informal and gives examples where it can be used with both prepositions _ "with" or "at". But just because you can say "mad at", it doesn't necessarily follow that "angry at" is correct. Replace "angry" with "happy" and it's clear that it's not right. Happy at my father? Don't think so. Happy with or happy for, depending on context. For what it's worth, my opinion is that "angry with" is if not more correct, then definitely more commonly used than "angry at".

August 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In the USA, it has become acceptable to use “angry at” though “angry with” continues to be slightly more common. To me “at” sounds more aggressive. I wouldn’t say it about my father, but maybe if I were really angry with my brother.... No, I am really rather a pacifist. We must keep on reporting it. https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/43671/angry-with-vs-angry-at-vs-angry-on

August 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiiildfire

Nuances make the difference here. "With" implies a relational usage, "at" implies an impersonal or objectifying usage.

I wouldn't contend that Duo take "angry at" out of the bank of correct translations, but it shouldn't be shown as the correct translation.

August 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosRossi2

Q for the group. Should not a female speaker be "enojada" and not "enojado"?

August 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robert.bowman

I don't know why anyone voted this question down. I came here with the exact same thought. I suspect this was just an oversight, and that, indeed, a female speaker should use "enojada" to describe themselves. It's just that this wouldn't prevent a speech synthesizer of any gender from saying exactly what you tell it to say, even if it isn't correctly paying attention to gender agreement. I think this is all that's happened here. I might be incorrect, but I think I've seen this addressed in other discussions, and some comments noted that occasionally they missed some of these. Hope this helps!

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

Josrossi2, try thinking of it this way: what if a woman Spanish teacher needs to teach you the Star Wars sentence, *Luke, I am your father." The voice of the teacher does not matter in the learning of putting a sentence together at all.

Funny little sentences used to be in the older version of the app (before the change to crown system) that said things like "I am a penquin," but I'm sure the teacher did not have to go get a penguin to do the speaking!

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

You are correct, each voice says every sentence regardless of gender. So. we have to pay attention to what was said and not by which synthesizer voice. Sometimes one voice is clearer than the other and other times it is the opposite, so they continue to use both.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WOOD40

I agree. It was a female speaker. It should have been enojada, but she said enojado.

May 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The sentences do not apply to the tts voices which are just reading them all, like we would read books.

May 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WOOD40

Thank you for letting me know that. I was not aware that everything was 'neuter' in the delivery. I shall keep this in mind. Definitely explains why 'she' read it as 'enojado.' Thank you for the tip.

May 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, the tts voices come from a company out of house, while, of course, the sentences are created in house.

May 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mongkingco

Why is it "yo estoy"? Shouldn't 'yo' be omitted because estoy refers to yourself anyway?

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffgoDai

It can be, but it doesn't have to be.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie271319

Yes, both are accepted. Yo estoy is redundant. Estoy is sufficient, and is very often accepted in duo lingo, as well it should be. Ask any of you Spanish speaking friends or co workers and they will tell you the same thing.

September 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/holiday94

Putting "yo" is optional, and it mean I

March 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinBedward

Tricky one. As an English speaker, I think normally we'd say '..angry with my' - but on reflection, I do find '...angry 'at'_' as being more contextually correct. Who am I angry at? 'With' perhaps suggesting you are both angry.

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Well that is the difference between “talking with” (two-way conversation) and “talking to”. “Angry with” was the original version and the Oxford dictionary does not show any examples for “angry at”. In America “mad at” is another popular expression and over time “angry at” has come to also be accepted though it was originally considered wrong.

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceBarlow

I don't understand why "Sometimes I am angry with my father" is wrong but "Sometimes I am angry at my father is correct". Don't both statements convey the same meaning?

January 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Both are correct, so please report it.

January 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynne650325

In US English, 'angry with' and 'angry at' should both be accepted as they are both used in English and are equivalent. (But 'mad' takes 'at', but not 'with'. Go figure.

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brackenwood3

Not good English to say "angry at", it should be angry with. DL please note!

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3
August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brackenwood3

Why not"annoyed with"?

October 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethanyZmu

I think this is valid answer as well. In my experience people use "molesto" to mean "annoyed" too.

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, in Spain “enfadado” means either angry or annoyed, but “enojado” means angry and “molesto” is used instead for annoyed.

https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/Annoyed

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethanyZmu

I definitely am not a native speaker or anything, but SpanishDict, Word Reference, and Cambridge Dictionary say that "annoyed" is a valid translation of "enojado" (http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/enojado, http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=enojado, & https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/spanish-english/enojado). What do you think? Are these bad dictionaries to rely on?

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

I think it depends on how you use the word annoyed. If you are annoyed enough to be angry, it could work. You could try reporting it and include the dictionary link.

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thesummerdancer

I thought con meant with, not at! Confused

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In Spanish it is always “con” with enojado, but in English you can say “angry with” or “mad at” and over time “angry at” and “mad with” have also come to be accepted.

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eysan629

Is ''Estoy enojado con su'' suitable too?

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“mi” means “my”, so “su” could not be used for this particular sentence since it means “his”, “her”, “your” (for usted or ustedes), or “their”.

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda851792

I answered "....angry WITH" but it did not accept. Suggestion was to use "...angry AT..."

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Please report it as also correct if everything else in your sentence is exactly like the answer above.

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagardbdot

more usual in English for this to be I am angry WITH my father

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Both at and with are common. Neither is "more usual". It's regional.

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlV68Gev

One sentence I said con mi padre and it was with my father. Another sentence it said con su trabajo. I wrote in English at his job. They wanted with his work. I have seen duolingo use con to mean at and with but yet I got it wrong when I tried it.

December 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethanyZmu

I would say it more commonly means "with" so I would try sticking with that.

December 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlV68Gev

I guess so but if you ask yourself, “What are you mad at?” Or, “Who are you mad at?” You can actually say, “At my dad.” You are mad at someone or something. You can be mad with his performance. Just as an example. Either way, should have gotten it correct.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Both “at” and “with” are correct, but “padre” means “father” and “dad” is “papá” and “daddy” is “papí”.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlV68Gev

Thanks

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/v.ivanova12

Is there a specific sentence order for words like "a veces", "siempre", etc.? I thought they should always come after the subject..?

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Don’t be confused with English adverb placement: https://www.thoughtco.com/adverb-placement-in-english-1211117

Spanish has its own rules: https://www.thoughtco.com/keep-adverbs-close-what-they-modify-3078169

In Spanish, the adverb that modifies the verb is more likely to come after the verb than before it, unless it is a negative adverb which must come before the verb.

This adverb modifies the entire sentence, so it can go at the beginning of the sentence. We actually can do that in English also.

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ateef63

Why "A" is using before "veces"? Cannot I start the sentence with "Veces"?

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

This is literally “at times”, but we usually say “sometimes.”

January 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiiildfire

Thank you. More literal translations would help sometimes.

August 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thiru123

No, because 'A veces' has to always be written together for the meaning to be 'sometimes'. For example, in English, 'Ice cream' is not the same as just 'cream', you need both words 'ice' and 'cream' together for the meaning to be 'ice cream'.

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mexicansnowbird

I don't understand why "yo estoy" yo=I estoy=I am why not just estoy?

January 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Estoy = am, but in Spanish you can omit the subject.

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shannon565108

Wow this is frustrating, it says to translate 'con' which translates to 'with'. But the answer says 'AT'. Am i seeing this wrong?

March 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In English both with and at are possible, but the Spanish typically uses “con”.

March 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArchanaDes7

Sometime i am angry with my father con means with. Mostly En is used for at. Why con is used for at?

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In Spanish this verb is used with “en”, but in English we can use “with” or “at”. Prepositions are often different from one language to another, so you may want to start translating expression for expression, instead of word by word.

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/professorcoffee

Perfectly acceptable in colloquial and formal English to be angry "with" someone. This should be corrected.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

I agree, it is most certainly correct. Be sure to report it with the Report Button.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline237678

Jaja, a veces...

June 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa386735

I said sometimes I get mad at my dad. Why would that be marked wrong?

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"dad" is "papá"

"father" is "padre"

“Get mad” means “become mad” which is not correct, though “Sometimes I am mad at my father.” is correct.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hawk-D

In English, madness is insanity rather than anger, which is an emotion. Insanity tends to be more permanent.

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is the more common meaning in British English, but check meaning 3 https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/mad

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoFacchini

I believe this Spanish sentence makes no sense. "A veces yo me quedo enojado con mi padre".

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria84895

I wrote sometimes i am mad at my dad, which should be correct too

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Padre = father Papá = dad Papí = daddy

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagardbdot

Mad at is an American phrase, not a British one . On the whole duolingo goes with an American version , so Im surprised in this case . In Britain we wouldn’t use mad at , or angry at ..it would be angry with or cross with .

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parlingu

Hi, American here. It is really and very much not an "American phrase."

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Using mad as a synonym for angry is limited to the US and Canada and is quite common.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cuji

I used mad instead of angry. They don't understand how these words are used somewhat interchangeably in English.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

What was your entire sentence?

January 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Val572575

You are correct. Another example is I'm going to have "a coffee" w/my father. 99% of the time we just have coffee in America, not 'a coffee'. These are some quirks DL needs to work out. Just as they push that in Spanish you never say this or that, or you always say this or that. Well, the same is true in English! Even the British don't say "a tea". They just have tea. :- )

September 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stanford157795

Why does dad not work as a substitute for padre here?

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Duolingo also teaches “papá” which means “dad”. So, no, “padre” means “father”.

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stanford157795

But I checked the definitions of "papá" and "padre" on the Duolingo website itself and it says dad or father works for both of them...

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Not usually...

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anthony139761

When i press on a word for example........CON.......and they give other meanings to that word.....in this case.....for CON.....they have... (At.....with.....and.)......i chose "with" and i was wrong?.....wth lol

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shelly235480

With my father should be accepted. Maybe it is a regional thing but it is correct.

April 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

So you should report it then.

April 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mo0sic

"Sometimes i am mad with my father" was labeled incorrect. Why can't that work?

April 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

We are likely to say “angry with” or “mad at”, but you could try reporting it.

April 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidKent4

I am confused! Doesn't "enojado" apply to a male speaker? Why is it a female voice? Shouldn't it be "enojada" instead?

June 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The tts voices ( not live people) read all sentences as if from a book. The sentences do not apply to the reader of the sentences, but to the writer of the sentences.

June 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JTrofatter

it did not accept my spoken answer

June 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VUEo21

It is confusing when Duo has a wrong gender make statements like Estoy enojado and it's a woman reader. Adjective agreement!

August 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The tts voices are text to speech synthesizers they read all sentences as one reads a book. The sentences do not pertain to them as they are not the ones who wrote them.

August 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ary506973

Angry with not accepted, 31.08. 2019. Reported

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmetAydog13

Did not accept estoy without yo as in "A veces estoy. . . "

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

If everything else was exactly the same then report it as also correct, but you should always put your entire answer here, just in case there was something else that you didn’t notice.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrusHaley

why does is have to be "Yo estoy enojado"? Can it be just "A veces Estoy enojdado con mi parde?"

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul188218

enojada female talking

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, “enojado”, because tts voice that sounds like a female reading what a male wrote. Both tts voices read all sentences as though reading a book.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keithfrancis

Angry with still not accepted. 29/9/19. What is wrong with that? Everybody uses angry with!

September 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnBraman1

Earlier in the lesson the words for "the father", "el padre" is offered... and yet "el padre" is so easy to translate. I'm not sure about the science of offering such simple translations, you are the experts. However, I think that many of the students will value more challenging phrases... so that we may better tune our ears to your beautiful language.... as an example, one of those challenging phrases is the rapid annunciation of "yo estoy enojado"..... Please, Please, Please, Duolingo editors. Offer up more really hard to understand alliterations of spanish words or phrases, so that we can better atune our inexperienced ears to these most challenging phrases. Thank you. I love Duolingo.

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

This is a user forum, so the course contributors and staff won't likely see your post. You would need to post it in the main forum.

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueBlazar

I just said every word correctly and it still marked it wrong. Is this a common bug?

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Hard for us to know if you said every word correctly, because we didn't hear you. That being said pronunciation is difficult yet there is also the possibility of something not working with the microphone or the program that "hears" you.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolaharr5

In English you NEVER say I am angry AT something - it is incorrect. You are angry WITH something or somebody. This needs correcting.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Never say never, though I myself prefer “angry with”. https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/43671/angry-with-vs-angry-at-vs-angry-on

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

You might want to read the link ALLintolearning3 posted. Just because you aren't familiar with it doesn't mean it isn't used that way. Angry at is common and correct.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiiildfire

Something being common doesn't make it correct. I have an English degree. It's improper English. I may use improper English occasionally when speaking with family and acquaintances, but I would never correct anyone towards bad grammar.

As I posted earlier, nuances make the difference here. "With" implies a relational usage, "at" implies an impersonal or objectifying usage.

I wouldn't contend that Duo take "angry at" out of the bank of correct translations, but it shouldn't be shown as the correct translation nor be defended (as you seem oddly invested in) as good grammar.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It doesn't break any grammar rules. Can you site a grammar book or style guide that states it's wrong?

I'm not oddly invested. I just find it odd that people insist something is wrong with no evidence.

EDIT it's been used for hundreds of years in English. There is no reason to call a commonly used phrase bad grammar.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiiildfire

"Hundreds of years"? Can you cite a reference for that? I have already explained why it's improper. Believe what you will. I don't have time to do research for other people but you can start with the Harbrace College Handbook or The Bedford Handbook, which are better references than a mass-contribution site like stack exchange.

I will refer also to the original Spanish sentence, which clearly uses "con".

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

"I don't have time to do research for other people"

"Can you cite a reference for that?"

You can't tell me you don't have time to do research for other people and ask me to do research in the same post :)

"I will refer also to the original Spanish sentence, which clearly uses "con"."

The preposition used in Spanish does not justify the use in English. The Spanish sentence penso en mi madre should not be translated as I think on my mother. And terminé de hablar shouldn't be translated as I stopped of speaking.

The prepositions used in English vary heavily by context.

He's jealous of her.

He's happy for her.

He's angry at her.

He's angry with her.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiiildfire

"You can't tell me you don't have time to do research for other people and ask me to do research in the same post :)"

True, I was being a bit sarcastic. My apologies.

For those familiar with etymology and older English texts, Spanish word usage wouldn't be so odd. It seems often closer to Old English and it would be more helpful sometimes to be taught the exact translations instead of confusing paraphrasing. When in Spain think like the Spanish do.

Verdad (Duo) = Really

Verdad (Duo later) = Truth

Veritas (Latin) = Truth

Verily (King James English) = truly

So Verdad = Truth or Truly

Also: "Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising/ From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;" ~ From Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

To "think on" something or someone is not so unusual.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Keep in mind that the sentence at the top of the page is a correct translation and not “the correct translation” and sometimes it is the answer last entered as also correct. You should see what some people get shown for a wrong answer when the algorithm tries to show them the answer that is closest to their answer rather than the best answer. I also prefer “angry with” though “mad at” is common enough to also be accepted, after all who is being polite when they are angry?

The fact that people are now mixing them up and saying “angry at” and “mad with” seems strange to me, but languages do evolve. Who am I to judge? English is also my best subject. The stack exchange just shows that these are used, but “ angry at” is used with situations rather than with people, as far as I know. Context makes a difference.

August 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolaharr5

Exactly. Thank you!

August 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

You seem to be confused. You just thanked the person who explained that you are totally wrong in the first sentence of your original post, while being half-wrong and only half-right in the second sentence of that post.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hawk-D

"Angry at" is American. "Angry with" is English

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is not that dialect specific. Both are used with a slightly different nuance. https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/43671/angry-with-vs-angry-at-vs-angry-on

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffgoDai

No one seems to know how to reply, so I'll start my own chain. "Angry with my father" Is similar, but not accepted in Spanish. It would be "Enojado con mi papa", which can have different meanings. Spanish has different grammar, so it doesn't work.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CajunCoding

Maybe the literal translation is "angry at" but it's at least more grammatically common, if not exclusively correct, to be "angry with" in English.

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, the literal translation is "angry with" and now both are accepted. "con" means "with".

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Mi papá = my dad

Mi padre = my father

August 9, 2019
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