"Ellosestánestudiandoenelaula."

Translation:They are studying in the classroom.

8 months ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CarolynH.3

First time I've ever seen 'el aula' after MANY years studying Spanish!!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Easy way to remember: Aula is also part of the brain (i.e. where people learn).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lidibell
Lidibell
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First time for me, too. Always great to learn new words, though.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It's always good to learn something new! I've encountered previously in Harry Potter books.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp? spen=aula

There are also several other ways to say classroom:

http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=classroom

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

This student came across this word for the first time in a high school Latin textbook. It took several years more for him to find that it had been inherited by Spanish as well! However, the Romans themselves appeared to have borrowed it from the Greeks. The original meaning was a large hall or court where a king or caesar would meet with his people. Relating the term to a lecture hall or hall of learning was likely a logical next step.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Cool! We use the word "aula" in Dutch. I don't know its origin, but it's used to mean a large meeting room in a school, aka auditorium.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bishop6
Bishop6
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Same in German!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKewley

Both my dictionaries list the feminine noun "la aula" Is aula both masculine and feminine?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlSkr
AlSkr
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Same as agua - it is feminine, but because pronouncing "la agua / la aula" is difficult it is changed to "el agua / el aula" for feminine words beginning with a

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Note that in plural it would be 'las aulas'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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AlSkr, to add to your comment: changing la to el is not just for "feminine words beginning with a."
It happens only when the feminine noun starts with a sressed a- or a stressed ha-.

Some feminine nouns that use el/un (because they are stressed on the first syllable):
El agua, el águila, el alma, el arma

Some feminine nouns that use la/una (because they are not stressed on the first syllable):
La abuela, la amiga, la hambre, la arena

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sqeeezy

"el hambre" & "las hambres"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

The hunger, and the hungers?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

palabra nueva para mi: aula

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaStrange

What form is "estudiando"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

It is the present participle/gerund form of estudiar. For any who do not know, present participles are verbs used as adjectives. Gerunds take the same form as the present participle but are used as nouns. In English they often end in 'ing' hence... 'studying'. In Spanish, the ending for 'ar' verbs is 'ando' and for 'er' and 'ir' verbs the ending is 'iendo'.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Not entirely correct. Present participles are used to create the present progressive (continuous) tense, in both Spanish and English. e,j., they are studying (estan estudiando).

In Spanish, the present participle is called a "gerundio."

The English gerund is a present participle used (in English) as a noun (as subject or object.) (By definition, it is used solely as a noun, not merely "often". A present participle is used either as part of the present (continuous) progressive tense, OR as a noun (gerund).

A present participle can, in English, also be used as an adjective. "He is a thinking being."
"A smoking engine is not a good sign."

"Smoking is bad for you". (gerund subject).
" I hate taking medicine." (gerund object)

Spanish translates the English gerund by using an infinitive.

"Fumar es malo para ti."
"Odio tomar medicina."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bishop6
Bishop6
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Good explanation. Have a lingot.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Thanks for the clarification SGuthrie0. Grammar has never been my forte.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fillmoe
Fillmoe
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I'm a little surprised to see the present progressive used here, although it is correct. Up to this lesson, I think, Duo has been using the simple present in place of this form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bishop6
Bishop6
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Duolingo apparently used this lesson to introduce the present progressive, although they didn't do enough to clarify exactly when the "presente progresivo" is appropriate to use in Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TJ-64

Present participle. "Studying" rather than "study"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Correct TJ, amending my post.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaPau
MichaPau
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Is auditorium a word that is used in English?

I tried that but was marked wrong...

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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An auditorium is part of a theatre (for example) where the audience sits to watch a play.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaPau
MichaPau
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I was thinking about an auditorium in a university where students are listening to a lecture.

Would aula in Spanish be used for that?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I've had many classes in auditoriums so that certainly works in English. Not sure about the Spanish side though.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fernanda351570

I thought aula was class not classroom

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bishop6
Bishop6
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"Aula" is the physical location where the class takes place.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atomic_brunette

I have always heard/seen "la sala de clase" for "classroom".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Levi_Ackerman-

Nobody says aula that i know of.

1 month ago
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