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  5. "I drink tea."

"I drink tea."

Translation:お茶を飲みます。

March 11, 2018

120 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas-Elliott

Could someone explain why the particle を is used instead of は or か. Particles don't really make sense to me. It would be really helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/authright

を is the direct object particle, since you are drinking the tea. は is a subject particle, but お茶 is not the subject of the sentence, you are. か is a question particle and will never be used in this position.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monkeyleg1

They mean が, not か。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathanger

so why in another exercise the correct answer was "おちゃはのみません。"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

は is not the subject marker but the topic marker. The subject can be marked by か。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

I can't edit my own response but か should be が。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaitanyad972223

Why it's asking me '私はお茶飲みます。'??? I wrote 'お茶は飲みます。' for 'I drink tea'. Isn't it right? It should've been accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dyl302994

Yeah. I drink tea means Tea, I do drink. I think ochya wo nomimasu means I will drink tea, Unlike ochya wa nomimasu which means tea, (I) drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin121657

This is where は serves as the contrast particle. It replaces を and/or が when the sentence turns into negative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcous8

おちゃis for harigana お茶 is for kanji and same for のみand 飲み


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dyl302994

I drink tea is like Tea, I drink. So I thought ochya wa nomimasu I think of ochya wo nomimasu as Tea (I) will drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkollMX

を is used to mark the object of the sentence. Whatever it is the subject's performing the action on. は is used to mark a topic for the sentence. が is used to mark the subject of the sentence, whoever's performing the action.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_.sarah12

What is the difference between the topic and subject of a sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkollMX

The subject is what/whoever is performing the action. That's not necessarily the topic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin121657

It's honestly hard to explain but the subject is whoever is performing the action or interaction. The topic is usually the subject interaction itself for example 私の名前はセラです     where subject is 私 (I) and the topic would be 私 giving the 名前 (name) so the main focus of the sentence is AFTER thr particle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin121657

When people use が it would be to put more emphasis on the subject rather than the topic. In other words は focuses more on what is after the particle whereas が emphasizes on what is before the particle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rexluther

ジョンさん は 英語 が 話せます。 John ↣ topic English ↣ subject CMIIW.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lezzdenden

Well. The full sentence would be

わたしはおちゃをのみます。

Since it's obvious we're the subject the わたしは is dropped because it's implied you are referring to yourself when you write みずをのみます (I drink water).

Now. If we're talking about the water itself. Then that's when you'd use は. For example: みずはおいしいです。(Water is delicious).

So the を isn't necessarily switching out the は particle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelenaDopu

This is very good explanation, but I don't know why Duo keeps giving us as only option は when sentence is negative and を when positive. Like 水を飲みます but 水は飲みません.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagiAladdin

I'm really terrible at understanding subjects and objects etc. I just think of it as whenever you want to 'do something' to 'something else' or have someone do something for you.

So you want to kick a ball? Ball を kick

Want someone to get Ice cream? Ice cream を get please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadiaGrifan

I'm not sure, but I think it's because "は" and "が" indicate the subject, and "を" indicates the direct object. In this case "I" is the subject (what is performing the action) and "tea" is the direct object (what is being affected by the action). I hope that helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

「お茶は飲みます」I drink tea (as part of my diet vs other things I could drink)

「お茶を飲みます」I drink tea, I will drink tea (as if you were to drink it as a sure thing)

Both are correct but the example only takes one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cris1tofu

This here was my thinking, i put は because that's what i thought fit the English sentence "i drink tea" which to me is a general statement, unlike "i will drink tea now"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

The particle "を" is used to indicate what is affected/involved in an action. The word that precedes を is the object (i.e. tea) and the verb (i.e. drink) after を refers what is done to the tea. On the other hand, "は" is a topic marker that refers to the subject doing the action. To say " おちゃはのみます" is to say " Tea is drinking". Thus, the appropriate sentence would be "(わたしは)おちゃをのみます" ("(I) drink tea").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dyl302994

What about the question where you translate お茶は飲みません

also can you explain how you say 1. I do drink tea and 2. I will drink tea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

Hi! From what I recall, the sentence structure is different when negating. So, instead of using "o/wo (を)," "ha (は)" is used alongside "-masen" (or the negation).

As for the other two questions, I'm not entirely sure, but maybe saying "hai, ocha o nomimasu (はい、おちゃをのみます)" could translate to "Yes, I drink tea" or "I do drink tea". For the "I will drink tea," I gotta call a friend on that haha

Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

Update: I asked a friend, and they said that the "o/wo" is more appropriate than the "wa/ha" to use in the sentence with "-masen" in negation. However, in conversational Japanese, sometimes the particle gets omitted cos the context is pretty understandable ("ochanomimasen"). So, I'm not exactly sure about the difference bet. the "o/wo" or "ha/wa" relationship when used in the negation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurros

Are you sure that is right? I would have thought "tea is drinking" would use ga, i.e. ocha ga nomimasu. With "wa" i thought it would be "as for tea, (I) drink it". Which more closely matches the English sentence "I drink tea" in my mind. But it is marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

Hi! I get the confusion. I'm also a newbie to Japanese, but I took a brief class before so I hope this could help. I can't recall the specific use of "ga (が)", but I remember it being used with words wherein "wa/ha (は)" wasn't applicable (e.g. instead of "nani ha," it's "nani ga" ("what...?") or instead of "dore ha," it's "dore ga" (which one?").

In Japanese particles, the particle goes AFTER the word it describes (sry for the capslocking way ahead - it's to help highlight the points). To fully visualize the sentence for this example, it is:

Watashi wa ocha o nomimasu. (I drink tea).

わたしはおちゃをのみます。

So, "wa (は)" is used to refer to the SUBJECT doing the action (i.e. watashi ("I")). On the other hand, "o/wo (を)" refers to the OBJECT that the subject is doing the action upon (i.e. ocha). What happens with the Duolingo version is that it cuts the "watashi wa" part off, leaving us with "ocha o nomimasu." So, the sentence implies the "watashi wa" part already when it omits it.

(Watashi wa) ocha o nomimasu.

Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gamar779043

Could it be that 「お茶を飲みます。」 would mean something like I will drink this specific cup of tea or specific type of tea as well?

(Like maybe even specifically green tea?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H80w6

if i say お茶を飲みます, doesn't that already imply that I'm the one drinking it? Who else would i be talking about?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guizai2001

upvote. i have the same question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

I think Duolingo does this to practice sentence structure (and that to say "おちゃをのみます" doesn't always mean "I drink tea" context-wise). I honestly agree that they should consider this response as it's pretty valid and we grasp what it means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gunva

The english phrase "I drink tea" is ambiguous when translating to japanese. You can interpret it as "Tea is one of many different things I drink" (おちゃをのみます) or "I don't want to drink anything other than tea" (おちゃはのみます). But duo only accepts the first interpretation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurros

Could you explain further where the "i don't want to drink anything other than tea" version works? I would never have guessed that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/princegomi

This one is annoying because the english translation is exactly the same whether the particle is 'wa' or 'wo'. You end up having to guess at which particule Duo wants you to say which ultimately causes confusion on what is and isn't correct ( especially when Duo has allowed both to be correct in previous lessons!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

It's usually を or が with positive sentences and は with negatives. Sometimes duo throws one with が where it should be は for a neutral one but it also accepts the は as an answer.

You just need to know when to use を and when to use が and have in mind that negative ones sound more natural with は in order to stress the negation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/princegomi

Thank you, I'll keep this mind!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasTeles80448

のみ is for liquid and 食べ for solid food?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guizai2001

yes. のみ drink / 食べ eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACrystalPaladin

What's the difference between "Ocha o nomi mas" and "watashi wa ocha o nomi mas"? Duolingo notified the former sentence is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maia360

The difference is that in the second you SAY it is you who drinks tea, in the first it is implied through context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YonnHonhon

I really don't get when to use 私はお茶ほ...... Or お茶ほ....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maia360

*お茶を You don't really need to use 私は, unless context would imply someone else. Here are some imaginary scenarios which might help you understand:

Scenario 1: You are talking with your friends about your other friend, Sarah. Somebody says 「お茶を飲みません」, meaning "Sarah does not drink tea". You want to say, "I drink tea". If you were to say お茶を飲みます, it would sound like you are saying "Sarah drinks tea", since you are already talking about Sarah, so it is implied through context. You must add 私は so it is clear that you are talking about yourself.

Scenario 2: You're at dinner with a friend. They ask you 「お茶を飲みますか?」 meaning "do you drink tea?" It is not necessary to say 私は here, since you are already talking about yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACrystalPaladin

I'm confused about that too...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JhonaKakad

what's the difference between ます and ません here at the end of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torukisaki

The difference between ます and ません is that ます is positive, whereas ません is negative. For example, "私は彼女を知っています” means "I know her", "私は彼女を知りません" means "I don't know her".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grexian2

ません at the end changes the meaning to "I do NOT drink tea."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Javier328076

ますis affirmative and ません is negative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/max._.idek

It taught me that "to drink" is のみ、But here its saying のむ is the only correct answer? Did I learn this wrong or am I missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lezzdenden

Verbs.

Buckle up, bro.

Drink is a U-verb (nomu) That's its infinitive form (to drink) But to actually use the verb, you've gotta change the U to an I (Nomu -> Nomi) you've also gotta follow verbs up with ます。

Ru-Verbs like みる (to see/watch) just drop the る, so it becomes みます (Miru -> Mimasu).

There's a third type of verb as well (irregular) but honestly I'd save that for a little later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BraydonAnd

のみ is used if you're changing the ending to be polite (飲み+ます). If you're just saying it without being polite, you'd use the plain form (what you'd find in a dictionary), which would be のむ. Look up Japanese Verb Based. This will really help with anyone learning the basics of Japanese and is a good review for anyone a little farther along...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BraydonAnd

Just look up the bases... There's bases 1-5 and bases ta/te. These are pretty much any kind of Verb changing that you'll come across.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BraydonAnd

Or rather, these are involved with every verb in the language. They're pretty important to know...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashrazel

Can someone explain why tabeé is «eat» and nomi is drink but ¿in/on?( almost all of us) the begining of this course we learn nomu as drink? Tabeé i thought train station and taberu : eat, but taberu i saw ¿in/on? goog translate. Thank you very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkollMX

Taberu and Nomu are the infinitive of the verbs to eat and to drink respectively. Nomimasu is Nomu conjugated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashrazel

Thank you, then, we need learn how to conjugated verbs before read, can you explain me ¿diference? Between masu and desu and when can i need use one another? ( no angry about my english please, i try). Please basic english words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkollMX

It's kinda hard to explain the difference without getting technical. But I'll try. Also, I'm not an expert, just a learner :)

Infinitives are the base form of a verb, describes the action in a general sense.

Conjugation is when the verb is used to describe an action, an action placed somewhere in time (tense). Here's an example in english

To eat (infinitive)

I ate something (conjugated to the past tense).

Finally, don't apologize about your English, we're all learning here.

I can explain in Spanish too if that'd make your life easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashrazel

Than you so much because you try to teach me infinitive and conjugated, but i am still ¿doubting? When i need to use masu and when desu; let me explain it (hope i can): Tanaka desu ( i am tanaka, so here i use desu because it is more polite) Ochâ wa nomi masu ( i drink tea, so here i use masu) ¿can i exchange masu and desu in that phrases? Is there other verbs ( infinitive or conjugated where use masu or desu? Need i learn some lesson who teach how and where and when use masu and desu for be polite and do not do it wrong? Thank you, hope you can understand me and my basic child english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkollMX

desu is basically the verb to be, this is why you would use it in "Tanaka desu". you cannot use interchangeably with -masu, because desu is its own verb, -masu is used to conjugate another verb. "Ocha wa nomi desu" would be a badly constructed way of saying "Tea is drink" where drink is no longer a verb, but a noun. (Aside: the correct sentence would be "Ocha wa nomimono desu")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

-desu roughly translates to "It is..." or a state of being. Example: Gakusee desu. ((I) am a student.) Tanaka desu. ((I) am Tanaka). Niji desu. ((It) is 2 o'clock).

Using "は" (read as "wa") makes the subject/topic of the sentence more explicit. Example: Watashi wa Tanaka desu. (I am Tanaka).

-masu/-masen is specifically used with verbs. There are 3 types of verbs, but the takeaway is these verbs are conjugated (based on their respective rules) before adding -masu/-masen. Example: ru-verbs (e.g. taberu or "to eat") Conjugation rule: drop -ru then add -masu/-masen (e.g. tabemasu/tabemasen).

In summary, -desu is used to refer to the state of something/being ("It is..."). -masu/-masen is strictly used with verbs (nomu -> nomimasu; taberu -> tabemasu).

I took a short Japanese class before and I got this from my Genki book. Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamran7293

Shouldn't it also accept not putting in watashi wa? I'm pretty sure "ocha wa nomi masu" is the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

You can skip the topic altogether and say お茶を飲みます。

Using お茶は飲みます makes an unnecessary contrast because is not expected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

You can omit only if it's clear that the subject/topic that is referred to drinking tea is you ("l"). Example: Friend A asks what Friend B is drinking. If you reply to Friend A's question and say " おちゃをのみます", you're replying "Friend B is drinking tea" since Friend B is the topic of your conversation.

I think Duolingo marks it wrong just to practice sentence structure. I did the same omission that's why I'm in the comments section.

Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guizai2001

i wrote お茶は飲みます, using は since i thought it to be a more general statement (as if "i usualy drink tea"). shouldnt お茶飲みます be used in a sentence like "i (will) drink this tea"? or should i report this sentence for being inacurate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maia360

お茶は飲みます sounds like "Tea drinks", since は is the topic marking particle. Since you are doing something to the tea (drinking it), the tea is the object, meaning you should use を.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maia360

For everyone wondering why it is nomimasu, rather than nomu or nomumasu:

"飲む" is the plain form. You use it only in casual or informal contexts. It's more important to learn formal speech.

The differences between the different formalities are: •Formal: Used with people you just met, elders, people who are superior to you. •Casual: Used with classmates, friends, people who are inferior to you. •Informal: Only used between close friends.

When using formal speech, you must conjugate the verb to its -ます form. How to conjugate depends on the type of verb you're dealing with. There are three types of verbs in Japanese:

•Group 1: Godan verbs, but we'll call them -u verbs for simplicity. These are verbs that end in -u.

飲む (のむ, to drink) 聞く(きく, to listen) 書く (かく, to write).

•Group 2: Ichidan verbs, but we'll call them -ru verbs for simplicity. These are verbs that end in -いる or -える.

食べる (たべる, to eat) 着る (きる, to wear) 開ける (あける, to open).

However, there are some verbs that end in -iru or -eru that look like they should be -ru verbs, but actually are -u verbs. 入る (はいる, to enter) 切る (きる, to cut). Most of the time though, it's consistent.

•Group 3: Irregular verbs. There are only two irregular verbs in Japanese, する (to do) and 来る (くる, to come). する is often paired with other words to make them verbs.

ダンスする (だんすする, to dance) シャンプーする (しゃんぷーする, to shampoo) 勉強する (べんきょうする, to study). You need to learn special conjugations for irregular verbs.

How to conjugate:

•-u verbs: Remove the -う, add -い, then add -ます. For example:

飲む -> 飲むます (nomu, nomimasu) 聞く -> 聞きます (kiku, kikimasu) 書く -> 書きます (kaku, kakimasu)

•-ru verbs: Drop the final -ru and add -masu. For example:

食べる -> 食べます (taberu, tabemasu) 着る -> 着ます (kiru, kimasu) 開ける -> 開けます (akeru, akemasu)

•Irregular verbs: Special conjugations.

する -> します (suru, shimasu) 来る -> 来ます (kiru, kimasu)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benji300879

So if I instead said "おちゃはのみます" that would mean something closer to "I am drinking tea" rather than the idea that I drink tea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torukisaki

No, that wouldn't.
If I heard the sentence "お茶はのみます", I would think that "You don't drink coffee etc., but you drink tea". The meaning of the sentence "お茶を飲んでる。" or "お茶を飲んでいる" or "お茶を飲んでいます" is close to "I am drinking tea."
Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevin.weitgenant

What is the meaning of the last two hiraganas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewBram

A politness indicator


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louie630197

I still don't know the distinction between "masu" and "desu".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lezzdenden

Masu - doing Desu - is

Your name is so you use desu

You eat so you use masu

It's water so you use desu

You drink water so you'd use masu.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackDunlap2

I dont get the symbols as they sound different each time when I play them slow or regular. Write it out in Roman alphabet,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

おちゃを のみます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moldir155915

what's wrong with word "drink" It sounds as nomu as well in Google it is with "-む" not with "-み"

Isn't it supposed to be 飲む instead 飲み???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maia360

"飲む" is the plain form. You use it only in casual or informal contexts. It's more important to learn formal speech.

The differences between the different formalities are: •Formal: Used with people you just met, elders, people who are superior to you. •Casual: Used with classmates, friends, people who are inferior to you. •Informal: Only used between close friends.

When using formal speech, you must conjugate the verb to its -ます form. How to conjugate depends on the type of verb you're dealing with. There are three types of verbs in Japanese:

•Group 1: Godan verbs, but we'll call them -u verbs for simplicity. These are verbs that end in -u.

飲む (のむ, to drink) 聞く(きく, to listen) 書く (かく, to write).

•Group 2: Ichidan verbs, but we'll call them -ru verbs for simplicity. These are verbs that end in -いる or -える.

食べる (たべる, to eat) 着る (きる, to wear) 開ける (あける, to open).

However, there are some verbs that end in -iru or -eru that look like they should be -ru verbs, but actually are -u verbs. 入る (はいる, to enter) 切る (きる, to cut). Most of the time though, it's consistent.

•Group 3: Irregular verbs. There are only two irregular verbs in Japanese, する (to do) and 来る (くる, to come). する is often paired with other words to make them verbs.

ダンスする (だんすする, to dance) シャンプーする (しゃんぷーする, to shampoo) 勉強する (べんきょうする, to study). You need to learn special conjugations for irregular verbs.

How to conjugate:

•-u verbs: Remove the -う, add -い, then add -ます. For example:

飲む -> 飲むます (nomu, nomimasu) 聞く -> 聞きます (kiku, kikimasu) 書く -> 書きます (kaku, kakimasu)

•-ru verbs: Drop the final -ru and add -masu. For example:

食べる -> 食べます (taberu, tabemasu) 着る -> 着ます (kiru, kimasu) 開ける -> 開けます (akeru, akemasu)

•Irregular verbs: Special conjugations.

する -> します (suru, shimasu) 来る -> 来ます (kiru, kimasu)

Please correct me if I got anything wrong, but I think this is right (^^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrueDark

Could someone please show me how to write " I drink tea." and "I do not drink tea." so I can compare the two and see what I am doing wrong? I have repeated the exercise a couple times and I still do not understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andris57247

The way I understand it:

I drink tea - (Watashi wa) ocha o nomimasu - (私は)お茶を飲みます

I do not drink tea - (Watashi wa) ocha o nomimasen - (私は)お茶を飲みません

If you don't use "watashi wa", you can also say "ocha wa" instead of "ocha o" for both, if you want to put emphasis on how it is tea that you drink/don't drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelCCab

Can't it be "ocha wa nomi masu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaEdUr

I'm pretty sure that's correct, based on what I've heard from others here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeanutBunions

I can omit the "わたしは" and just say "おちゃをのみます." However, it was marked wrong. Is this just like Duolingo's req't to practice formal structure?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benjamin340658

Isn't this wrong because it does not say, "I am drinking tea." It says, "I drink tea." So, shouldnt the answers be "ocha o nomimasu" the same way "gohan o tabemasu" means, "I eat rice"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gamar779043

It does say that. It just adds the watashi wa (I) that is sometimes omitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AskFlo

Did i miss something? In other answers leaving out the わたしは was accepted because the "I" is implied, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gamar779043

If you wrote without 私は that shouldn't mark you wrong. But what else did you write? Was there any other errors in your answer? If not report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corishuwa

Is 私は really needed in the beginning? I excluded that part and got it didn't accept it. Wouldn't it be implied?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the.siah

Why is it 私わ here but not in 肉わ食べます. They are both saying "i eat/drink something" but previously eating hasnt required 私わ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gamar779043

Refrain from making duplicate comments xD haha

私は can be omitted, (note that watashi >wa< is spelled with は ha at the end)

If you didn't include 私は then maybe somethign else was wrong? If you wrote 私わ then what's wrong is the わ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the.siah

ahh my bad, I got a notice saying "something went wrong" so I assumed the comment didn't post and wrote it again :P

Also thank you for pointing that out as I didn't notice, but the problem was more to do with the inconsistency of the answers. For example in some questions, such as translating "I eat meat" if I didn't include "Watashi wa" it would give me a wrong answer, however in other similar questions, I would get it right.

The part that confused me is that there was no indication from Duolingo as to whether or not "Watashi wa" should be included or not. The sentences kept the same form as "I eat [something]" but for some reason, the answer seemed to vary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgswenson

No matter what i do i cant type the "o" character in 私はおちゃ__飲みます. Can someone pleaae teach me how to type it because i cant pass any od these tests that use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

を is written "wo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgswenson

Thank you! Even when I searched on google it was giving me "o".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anya_Dubinkina

Why 私はお茶をのみます is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Genesis94387

Why do we have to use 私? Doesn't it imply that you are drinking and why do we use は instead of o?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrabJessK

Why all the sudden are we using watashi wa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiciniusCrassus

私は just means, "as for me" or "in relation to me". So it just indicates that tea is what is being drunk "by me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/missterious899

Kinda confuse of how を works


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiciniusCrassus

を marks the object being acted on. So, お茶を, is of course tea, but with the をparticle indicating that it is the object "being drunk". 私は just means "in relation to me" or "as for me". So really the sentence translates to: As for me, the tea (is what I am) drinking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan95578

I didn't think watashi wa would be required because previously I was taught that it was implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hellion_Dez

Ok i really need a clarification because im getting beyond confused now.

It asked me how to say "I drink tea." in japanese.

I wrote お茶は飲みです。(ocha wa nomi desu.) Says im wrong and the correction was 私はお茶を飲みです。(watashi wa ocha o nomi desu.) But clicking this help thread its saying お茶を飲みです。(ocha o nomi desu.)

Mean already from the conflicting 2 answers duolingo is giving me I feel im correct and duolingo wrong. As I understand it

お茶(tea)は(used like is subject, implying myself in this context)飲み(drink as a verb?)です(it is) and this would be a more natural way to say I drink tea. While 私はお茶を飲みです。is right but is much more textbook like way to say I drink tea. And お茶を飲みです。I'm not sure, because i dont understand the context of wo that well i understand its a direct object but not sure i get what that means in english sentences thought it was like "the"?

I'm still pretty much a begginer at japanese and getting more confused I just want to know mostly was I correct with "お茶は飲みです。"? If not why? Or is it just impossible to figure out the right answer I should use with so little context as "I drink tea."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hellion_Dez

Since i can't edit all the です(desu) i mean ます(masu) im just so confused im messing up simple concepts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavin440696

Is this meant as simply stating that you drink tea, or that you want to order some tea?

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