"I have had a hat since you have had a hat."

Translation:Ich habe einen Hut, seit du einen Hut hast.

11 months ago

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Blackwater13

Why not "Ich hatte einen Hut seit du einen Hut hattest" ? Ich habe einen Hut isn't that in the present time like "I have a hat"?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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It is. The problem is that English uses the perfect tense to express a present meaning: “I have had a hat [since…]” means “I have a hat now [which I got…]”. This use of the English perfect has to be translated as present tense in German. More examples:

  • I have lived here for a couple of months. -> Ich wohne hier seit ein paar Monaten.
  • He has known this for three years. -> Er weiß das seit drei Jahren.

If you translated it as past tense, it would mean that the state you’re talking of is no longer valid. Or that you’re telling a story maybe.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
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But why are simple present and past tenses the only option? Why not "Ich habe einen Hut gehabt seit du einen Hut gehabt hast"? That seems like the most literal translation of the English sentence, no?

EDIT: I've just read your answer to this below. Apparently Germans decided that the best way of dealing with different tenses it to make them mean exactly the same thing. You start with two different sharp knifes, so let's dull them until any fine difference goes away... Makes perfect sense, why all these complications? That what happens when you let humans mess with the language ;-)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NorbertMarko

I know this sounds right, but since it is in the Dative Prepositions lesson, shouldn't it be : "...,seit du einem Hut hast?" instead of "einen Hut"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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No, haben wants an accusative object. I’m not entirely sure why you got this sentence in the Dative Prepositions lesson. I can only assume it’s because of seit which can indeed be a preposition used with dative case, for example seit einem Jahr “for one year/since one year ago”. But in this case it’s a conjunction introducing a subordinate clause, so it shouldn’t be in a dative prepositions lesson if you ask me – unless its intentionally used to throw people off.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NorbertMarko

Thanks! I love Duolingo, and the fact that it says it out loud so I do not develop an awful accent but It's hard sometimes to figure out these things alone.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoubleLingot
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Beware of the ❤❤❤❤❤ traps!

Seit roughly means "since". However, it works a bit differently. First, it always denotes something that is still going on. Second, it has three different ways of usage. Consider these examples: Ich lerne seit sechs Jahren Englisch. (I'm learning English for six years now.) Ich lerne seit 2012 Englisch (I've been learning English since 2012.) Ich lerne Englisch, seit ich denken kann. (I've been learning English since I can think.) In the first example, seit defines a stretch of time, which reaches into the present. In the second example, it also defines a stretch of time, reaching into the present. But it defines this stretch of time by its starting point. Seit can also be a subordinating conjunction (check the lesson "Conjunctions"). In these, the verb leaves the second position of the sentence, and ends up at the end. This is why in the last example, ich kann denken (I can think) turns into seit ich denken kann.

And by the way, what's wrong with the translation "Ich habe einen Hut seit ihr einen Hut habt"? Is this a no-go? Reported.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBur671419

How exactly does seit work in terms of sentence structure? Is it similar to conjunctions like "weil" or "sondern"? Thanks

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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seit is a subordinating conjunction like weil.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JhonEdisonOrtiz
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11/09/2018
''Ich habe einen Hut, seit ihr einen Hut habt'' isn't accepted.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdTyrone

As of Feb. 2019 the following German translations are still not accepted (but have both been reported):
"Ich habe einen Hut, seit ihr einen Hut habt." (edited/corrected)
"Ich habe einen Hut, seit Sie einen Hut haben."

Both Sie (formal "you") and ihr (plural "you") should be applicable to this sentence. Is there any reason these two sentences should not be accepted by Duolingo?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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“seit ihr einen Hut habt” ;)

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdTyrone

Ah, I typo'd that one. Yes, I did use "Ich habe einen Hut, seit ihr einen Hut habt." for that answer, but it is still not accepted. Thanks for catching my slip up, AbunPhag!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karthik.subr

Shouldn't this translate to: Ich habe einen Hut gehabt, seit du einen Hut gehabt hast?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karthik.subr

Nevermind, it is also accepted as one the answers.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackTLG

Thanks, it worked.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GayCassie

Formal you (seit Sie einen Hut haben) is not accepted, not sure why.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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Is it possible that you entered an incorrect verb form? With formal Sie it should be: “Ich habe einen Hut, seit Sie einen Hut haben.”

If that wasn’t the problem then they probably just forgot to add that as a possible answer. Feel free to use the report function to report the mistake directly to the contributors if it comes up again.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GayCassie

Thank you, I'll report it next time.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4of92000
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Consider it reported.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/filsino
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Wouldn't this translate to: "Ich hätte einen Hut, seit du einen Hut hättest"? or maybe "Ich hätte einen Hut, seit du einen Hut hast"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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No, hätte (as well as hättest, hätten etc.) are the past subjunctive forms. They basically indicate a hypothetical/non-real situation, much like English “would have” (although English uses the past for this in some situations – most notably conditionals like “if I had a hat” – because the past subjunctive merged with the simple past in English).

The simple past form of haben is hatte, without the Umlaut.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleSant

Shouldn't this be: I have a hat, since you have a hat.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FancyFrau
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I have a hat, since you have a hat is saying I have a hat because you have a hat. I have had a hat since you have had a hat is saying you have had your hats for the same amount of time

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheM11Mum
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I agree with you Fancyfrau, and I too am a native English speaker, in England to boot!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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Would you say that though (I’m assuming you’re an English native speaker)? I learnt that for cases like this one, you use the present perfect in English: Subject has been in state x since point y/for y amount of time --> ”I have had a hat since…”

English seems to focus on the “this state was valid in the past” aspect while in German we focus on the “this state is valid now” aspect: “Ich habe einen Hut seit…” It sound quite awkward to use perfect tense here (at least in Standard German).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleSant

I am not a native English speaker, nonetheless I think it would make much more sense that the English Translation for the sentence: 'Ich habe einen Hut, seit du einen Hut hast' would be: I have a hat, since you have a hat.

My question is, since the sentence is: 'I have had a hat, since you have had a hat' Wouldn't the German Translation would be: 'Ich habe einen Hut gehabt, seit du einen Hut gehabt hast' ?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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Yes, that sentence would sound rather weird in German.

The problem is that the situation involves an odd combination of what’s called “perfect” and “progressive” aspects in linguistics: A situation started in the past but it is still ongoing today. English can use the present perfect for this (although it does have other uses too) – so you could say English focuses more on the fact that part of the action occurred in the past. German on the other hand has a construction called “Perfekt”, but in terms of use it’s pretty much just a past tense in modern German. So there is no difference in meaning between “Ich habe in Berlin gewohnt” and “Ich wohnte in Berlin”. Both would mean “I used to live in Berlin (in the past)”, implying that I don’t live there anymore. If we want to say that the situation is still ongoing, we use present tense instead: “Ich wohne [seit…] in Berlin.” It’s simply the English perfect being used in ways the German one can’t.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasCa376585

Thanks for the great explanation!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleSant

Thanks indeed!. So just to clarify: If I want to say that 'I have been studying German for seven years' (and thus I am still studying) in German, this would be: 'Ich habe Deutsch fuer 7 Jahre studieren', and NOT 'Ich habe Deutsch fuer 7 Jahre gestudiert' ?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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Correct, you would use present tense: “Ich lerne seit 7 Jahren Deutsch.” If you said “Ich habe sieben Jahre lang Deutsch gelernt,” that would mean you are not learning it anymore.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haroldhansen

I think the reason the english translation of this sentence sounds so wrong to those of us who are native english speakers, is the way since is being used in this sentence. At least for me, if you are using since as a time reference, it would make more sense to say - I have had a hat for as long as you have had a hat - I would never use since here. If using since as a sense of -because- then it would be I have a hat since (because) you have a hat without throwing the word -had- in. The sentence as is seems to be combining and mixing the two.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SharonNaor
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Why does "Ich habe einen Hut seit ihr einen Hut habt" wrong? And also- can that means the two of you have one hat each, or does it have to be one hat together?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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If you use ihr the verb form has to be habt rather than hast.

As for the interpretation… It’s possible that a linguistic nitpick might only regard the “the group of you have a single hat” as correct. In practice though it’ll depend on knowledge of the actual situation.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SharonNaor
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Thanks. I did use 'habt' here but it was still marked wrong. If I understand you correctly, I need to report it?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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In that case, yes, you should report it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paculino
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Can 'seit' have OSV, OVS, SVO, or VSO? SOV is confusing to me.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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No, SOV is the only option for subordinate clauses.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamyasriMa

Why it is not " ich habe einen hut seit du hast einen hut" ?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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seit introduces a subordinate clause, and in subordinate clauses the conjugated part of the verb comes at the very end.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rudgedw
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Warum nicht "seit dem du einen Hut hast"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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seitdem (be careful to spell it as one word) should be accepted as well. Be aware though that seitdem can also be an adverb meaning literally seit + dem “since then”.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/one_half_3544

What's wrong with "Ich habe einen Hut, seit ihr einen Hut habt" here?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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Nothing, it should be accepted.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/one_half_3544

I've reported, thanks.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vikram551092

"Since" here is referring to Time and not Reason - hence 'Seit', isn't it?

If it was "I have a hat since (because) you have a hat." would that translate to: "Ich habe einen Hut, denn du hast einen hut" ?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I.Schmidt1
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I have a hat because (since)you have a hat. translate to: Ich habe einen Hut, weil du einen Hut hast
In this case it refersto reason, not to time!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakura_7

Ridiculous

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/franco707833

So why am I seeing present perfect sentences when I can barely understand German present.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/franco707833

Duolingo puts in in present perfect cause since is used with present perfect.. Am I right?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
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Sort of. English likes to use present perfect for verb actions which started in the past and are still ongoing in the present (actually present perfect progressive is more common with normal verbs, but it sounds odd with “to have” in most situations). Usually you see a clause with “since” or “for”:

  • I have been living here for 5 years.

German regards this as present tense since it’s still ongoing:

  • Ich wohne hier seit 5 Jahren.
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesseGaronP
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This is not a good translation. A correct translation requires the perfect.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Della312252

I am really fed up with the continued use of this sentence. I don't understand it in English let alone German. Ànd the translation in Google translate is much more comprehensible. Please can you get rid of this and replace it with a less contentious sentence?

1 month ago
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