"Kommst du auch laufen?"

Translation:Are you also coming for a run?

March 14, 2018

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElenaLiesje

I don't think the English translation is very idiomatic. I think we'd be more likely to say 'are you also coming for a run?'

May 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karyn566301

I totally agree it is not idiomatic and sounds a bit odd. "Do you also come running?" is absolutely correct grammatically, but is an unusual expression.

"come running" has its own idiomatic meaning, which is "an immediate response". A dramatic example, but say someone is in the hospital and their heart monitor flat lines. You can expect that the nurses and doctors will come running.

It can also have a slightly negative meaning of "at your beck and call". For example, "whenever my spouse wants something, they expect me to drop everything and come running."

Adding "also" to the sentence puts the whole idiom into a list. "In the case of emergency what you do is: you let the team know, you call the family and you also come running." (For some reason we're back in the emergency room!)

I can think of one exception to this usage: if you were inviting someone to go on a run after another activity. "That was fun playing badminton together. Would you also like to come running?" But for that to sound natural, it requires changing Duolingo's "Do you..." to "Would you [also] like to..."

May 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karyn566301

I know we're learning German, but I thought I'd share my thoughts on the English sentence as a native speaker. :) I am also curious if the German sentence has the same sort of ambiguity? If I heard that statement, what is the speaker actually wanting to know?

May 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

Hi Karyn, thanks for sharing your thoughts, because this is actually interesting. The German phrase isn't ambiguous at all in this sense, but the way how you describe "come running" is probably translated as "(an-/herbei-)gerannt kommen", e.g. "Die Ärzte kommen herbeigerannt", "Wo bleibt denn Peter? Ach, da kommt er angerannt...". There are various combinations with other verbs than rennen, like laufen, springen, sprinten, eilen and different prepositions (an, herbei, heran, her) that differ in their degree of formality and a little bit in connotations, but the idea is always similar, i.e. arrive somewhere quickly or in a hurry, often leaving everything else where it is...

Anyway, this "auch"/"also" is a bit disturbing in that context. It sounds a bit reproachful or even sneery to me, like "So, you're finally arriving, too? You're pretty late, my friend..."

May 26, 2018

[deactivated user]

    I agree. We are more likely to talk about "going running".

    June 21, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E5Pepe

    "Do you also come walking?" doesn't apply here why?

    March 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stepintime

    It could mean "walking" here. At first glance I'd understand "Kommst du auch laufen?" to mean running/jogging as a sport; but supposing you're with a group of people who decide to go to a place, some by car, some on foot, then you could ask if "you come walking with us, or are you joining someone in their car?"

    I wouldn't use it to say, "Will you go for a walk with me?", though. I'd say, "Kommst auch spazieren?" or "Gehst du auch spazieren?"

    Generally: "gehen" = slow pace; "laufen" = to go on foot or to walk at a quick pace or to run in an athletic context; "rennen" = to run quickly

    March 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorge997087

    Thank you very much,

    "Generally: "gehen" = slow pace; "laufen" = to go on foot or to walk at a quick pace or to run in an athletic context; "rennen" = to run quickly"

    has made the laufen / rennen difference clear to me.

    May 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    oh, thnx!

    May 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

    I think it's more than unlikely to mean walking here. If I say come running/walking in English, this can mean the way how to arrive somewhere, i.e. the -ing form modifies the verb before, but the German infinitive cannot be used this way, it means "do you come to run", but it doesn't say how you arrive there, by car, bus, walking, whatever. In order to modify come/kommst, it would have to be "laufend" or "rennend", or better "zu Fuß" (=walking). But with the infinitive it is like "come to do some activity" (e.g. singen/spielen/tanzen/feiern/trainieren/.

    Then, like already mentioned, "laufen" as an activity is running, not walking. If you add a destination, it could mean laufen as a way of "transportation" (i.e. going by foot/walking), but this is not the case here.

    So, the problem of Duo's translation here is that they replaced the German infinitive with a present participle, which can lead to a wrong interpretation.

    March 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stepintime

    True, "come to run" looks more idiomatic to me than "come running"...

    I totally overlooked before that the English sentence could (although it's not really phrased to fit that context, I think) be intended to mean "come running" as in sentimental song lyrics: "If I call out to you, will you come running?" In German, there's no poetic way to put that, but on an informal level you might say, e.g., "Schau, da kommt er gelaufen / angerannt / gefahren!" = "Look, there he (or "er" = the train) is coming [and he (or it) is doing it on foot / running / driving/rolling]".

    It's not very elegant, though, and I definitely wouldn't count "Kommst du auch gelaufen?" as a possible translation of "Do you also come running?". The only context in which I can remotely imagine this sentence would be that I've been waiting impatiently for somebody who's late, and I welcome him by saying, "Kommst du auch mal gelaufen?" "Now finally you're ambling in at last, are you?"

    March 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osarok

    Could you not use it for walking as exercise? Some people do brisk walking in the morning for their health, for example.

    May 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

    It's rather unlikely, but not totally excluded. Especially in this combination as "laufen gehen" it's practically always running. Even if you say this as a native, intending "going for a walk", it's very likely that you would be mistaken. Probably it could also be used to mean (nordic) walking as a sport (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking). The difference between walking and spazieren is mostly just the intention and the dress...

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    go for a walk. Since when does that not sound rright?

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    I am fluent in german and "laufen" is walk. "Rennen" is run/ning...

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

    Apparently being fluent doesn't mean that you know all meanings and connotations of the words. Look at some online discussions about this topic like https://german.stackexchange.com/questions/9288/wann-benutzt-man-laufen-und-wann-rennen or https://german.stackexchange.com/questions/18395/is-there-any-difference-between-laufen-and-rennen. Or just trust a native like me.

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    I'm native. Why not trust me? I AM german.

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

    Sorry, then your translation to English is a bit limited.

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

    I know that it's mean, but what should I say? You simply ignore the discussion here and you also ignore the usual dictionaries like dict.cc, where the top translation of laufen without any further specification is "to run", whereas for "to walk" it is specified as "laufen [zu Fuß gehen]". Look also at Duden.de if you trust them more than me:

    1. a) sich in aufrechter Haltung auf den Füßen in schnellerem Tempo so fortbewegen, dass sich jeweils schrittweise für einen kurzen Augenblick beide Sohlen vom Boden lösen

    Or do a simple test: As a native German, does "Kommst Du auch zu Fuß gehen" sound good to you? I think you cannot replace this "laufen" here with a way of moving from A to B, but with an activity/hobby/sport, that would be joggen/walken (in German).

    If you look at the problem from the other side, how would you translate "I run for an hour every morning to stay fit"? Ich renne jeden Morgen eine Stunde, um fit zu bleiben? This clearly has to be laufen, just have a look at the magazines/video tutorials/discussion forums in German (also https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laufsport).

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    That's MEAN. But admitedly my translation might not be the best for some things, but on this I am adamant!

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    Well... This is the meaning I was taught by my dad when I was a kid and HE'S german too... I'll check with him again. Ok? Happy?

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    I admit, I am a little grumpy, I don't like being told I'm wrong.

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPhoenix777

    I don't know but I but something similar. I agree! It should be accepted. Trust my word as a fluent german person.

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chumpington

    "Do you also come running?" is bad English

    June 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann390834

    "too" means the same thing as "also" in english so why is it not accepted?

    April 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      What was your full sentence? There are accepted answers with either "too" or "also", but the word order changes:

      "Do you also come running?"
      "Do you come running too?"

      May 10, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aqeel_N

      unnatural sentence

      July 30, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich999

      You just call out my name and you know where ever I am I'll come running to see you again. Winter, spring, summer or fall all you got to do is call and I'll be there you've got a friend.

      October 11, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSavageIII

      Can someone please explain when "laufen" means "to walk" vs. "to run"? It seems to change randomly.

      June 30, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

      If you're talking about a way to get from a to b, it is likely to mean walking, while if you're talking about sports, it's nearly always running. Anyway it's an ambiguous word; In it's strict definition it means a rapid walking motion in which - for a short time - no foot touches the ground, while at the same time it's colloquially used to mean any kind of walking, often replacing "zu Fuß gehen".

      June 30, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serafini17

      Are you running too?

      October 30, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sea-mist

      that is what I wrote and it marked it as wrong. It must want us to put the word "come" into the sentence

      January 23, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samanthaisgs

      I don't quite understand the translation. I initially translated it as "Are you also coming to run?", assuming "laufen" was being used as an infinitive, but it was marked wrong. I later translated it to "Are you also coming running?", and it was accepted.

      Does translating "kommst" to "coming" make "laufen" a participle or something, meaning it has to have the -ing ending in its English form? If that is the case, does that mean translating "kommst" to "come" would make it acceptable to translate the sentence to "Do you also come to run"?

      December 25, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will709432

      Why laufen here and not läuft?

      September 4, 2018

      [deactivated user]

        Because it would be just as wrong as saying in English, "Do you come walk?" You can't have two present tense verbs in the same sentence, unless the sentence consists of more than one clause, like "I run quickly so that I arrive early".

        September 4, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

        There is always just one finite verb per clause, all others have to be infinitives or participles. (...as an extension to David's comment)

        September 4, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will709432

        Thank you both

        September 4, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekSimms

        Very basically, this DL solution is how most of my German relatives would theoretically ask if I were 'also coming running'. Forget all that stuff about negative connotations around 'come running', that's subjective; if I'm - for instance - dressed in a tracksuit when I say that, I am almost certainly not saying they are at my 'beck and call' am I. When I went running/jogging, call it what you want, I would ask something like, 'are you coming running too?' Punto!

        October 14, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PegWhitman

        Do you want to come running sounds smoother. Come running is more apt to be used when saying someone came running to see what was happening.

        October 20, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patelin1

        I think "do you come to run too" is correct. All these "Ich trinke gern" etc. make me think of certain senate hearings. . . .

        October 21, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vu_Quy_Trong

        i type:" do you come to run too'' and duo accepted my answer. is that right ???

        October 27, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HardeepSin232482

        What's the difference between laufe and renne ??

        November 4, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/om606na

        Only yesterday I watched a YT video about laufen vs rennen vs gehen. Aaand laufen is supposed to mean 'to walk' not 'to run'. So .. wouldn't it be 'Do you also come for a walk?' ?

        November 6, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

        Which video? Have a look here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/laufen and here https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/laufen (1a & 1b) Depending on the context it can be both to run (e.g. in sports) and to walk.

        November 6, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/om606na

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HG59Yf5xspE&t=265s That's the video I mentioned, but it's in polish, so .. not sure if You can make anything out of it :)

        November 7, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max.Em

        Thanks for the link. I definitely disagree that laufen means only to walk (as a native German speaker). There is a nice explanation about the topic here: https://german.stackexchange.com/a/18406 It also shows that even among Germans there is some discussion about the usage of laufen, but the bottom line is that depending on the context it can be fast (=> to run, but not for your life...) or slow (to walk), and sometimes it's ambiguous.

        November 7, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josie320315

        I was taught laufen is walking and rennen is running. Why is it not consistent?

        January 16, 2019

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ouzo16

        The English structure here is very weak.

        February 5, 2019

        [deactivated user]

          I agree. We might say, "Do you go running?" or "Are you coming running?" but "Do you come running?" sounds odd and unnatural in English.

          February 5, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yousef115396

          Are you also coming to walk?

          February 5, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yousef115396

          Do you also come to walk?

          February 5, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elwyn3607

          The translation doesn't seems like part of a normal English conversation.

          As a native English speaker I would naturally say: 'Are you coming walking too?' or 'Are you coming running too?'

          I just discovered that's also an acceptable answer to the question.

          February 13, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VileVillain

          I wrote, "Are you coming for a run too?" and it marked it wrong. Is there a reason or should that be accepted too?

          March 14, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iwche22

          why not ... for a walk? thanks!

          March 26, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mz147

          Why not Kommst du auch zu laufen?

          August 6, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yousef115396

          Isst du apfel gern

          October 18, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yousef115396

          Do you like to eat apple

          January 16, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yousef115396

          Iike to eat apple

          November 4, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yousef115396

          Do you like to eat apple?

          December 25, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulioQuint4

          Are you also walking? Maked more sense.

          November 4, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulioQuint4

          Sentence does not make sense!

          November 4, 2018
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