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"Ellos son empleados públicos."

Translation:They are public employees.

5 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/spanishcabbage

Lol I almost typed "public sandwiches"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tanishq815589

Me too

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wingo87

Ha ha!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silver_trish

What does "public employee" mean? Does this sentence make sense?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/younglevity

Yeah it does, cops are public employee, bus drivers are public employee etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoradoRonald93
DoradoRonald93
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Public employees are those peoples who work for the Nation.

Also we say them:

Funcionarios Públicos

Servidores públicos

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I am assuming it is approximately equivalent to civil servants?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShoyZeta

Public employees/ public workers will be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CrimsonCorona10

'Public servants' is another vernacular used in the US socially, and legally as well. Government employee basically. Public denoting that the SERvices are tax funded, and therefore the SERvants public as well :D

Hope this helps

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/masterrelin

A public employee is someone who works for the government, like a mailman or a Congress person

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

bureaucrat

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maryktify

Public employees.. does not quite sound right in English. "public servants" should be accepted as a right answer, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menno1986
Menno1986
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civil servant perhaps?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antoneeyuh

Public employees sounds just fine to me. People who work at the post office are public employees.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/positivelySophia

This was posted a year ago so it might have been changed since then, but I typed "public servants' and it was accepted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Ramen-

Public official is the term that I hear locally. Derivatives would include the denotation of the level of office held, I.E., "State Official" or "County Official."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

I typed "They are sucking at the taxpayer's teat" and it accepted it.

(No, not really.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A-VIV-A

I forgot the l in "public". Wasn't sure why i got it wrong until i read out loud. Gave me a good laugh.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Haha. Enjoyed that and I enjoyed undoing a thumbs down which was set by someone with no sense of humor like as not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/habla-aleman

Isn't a 'public officer' another correct term for a person employed by the state?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kookkie
Kookkie
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they are civil servants

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779
Ash473779
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Here in the UK We call them civil servants.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shantanu950840

"They are government servants" was accepted!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moonrabbit92

I like how I spelled it wrong, but it still accepted it, because it kinda still sounded like the word. Empliados - empleados

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dimitra.ou

The phrase Public employees seems to be a direct translation from spanish . In other languages too they use such a phrase for government employees

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman347

Could this also mean that "they are publicly employed"? I know it might not make sense but does it technically speaking?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnSunset

In my experience, the term "civil servant" is not used often in the U.S.A. Some people may, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/segviolation
segviolation
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I swear she is saying "ellos son empleados por ricos"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/r_226079208

Lols, I almost wrote pubic employees.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ana576428

In English, public officer and civil servants are acceptable and correct descriptions of Government workers and should be accepted here.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Personally I don't think I have ever heard anyone ever say public officers and I don't think I would know what that meant. Is it a British term? I think I would assume they were military or police, since those tend to be the only people we casually refer to as officers. Civil servants is probably the best since public employees is also not a common term in my experience.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leabea87

By "public employees" do you mean "civil servants"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I am assuming só. Lay people generally talk about civil servants, but Government agencies do also talk about public employees.

http://payday.revealnews.org/

I don't know for sure if that is just another term or if public employees is a broader term. I would be sure that all civil servants are public employees, but I don't know whether all public employees are considered civil servants.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mike2813

I gave "they are public servants" and it was accepted. That's probably the most common English translation, so i'm glad it worked. Or you might say "government employee." I don't hear "public employee" much, but that's just American English,

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trumaine7

Ok I've asked this in other comments and no one has explained it good enough for me to understand.. Why and when do you start switching words around

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I think the reason no one answered you before is that the question is too vague. There are many ways that Spanish syntax varies from English syntax and each has its own set of reasons The only thing I can see here that is "switched around" is maybe the adjective. Actually, however it is more common in Spanish for the adjective to follow the noun. Here is a link that explains the ins and outs of Spanish adjective placement.

https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

The other things that can get moved around are objects which can sometimes be attached to verb forms and even the subject and verb can get switched around. Even in declarative statements, the subject can follow the verb but that's not as much rule driven as a matter of personal style and emphasis.

1 month ago