"Esechicoguapo,¿loconoces?"

Translation:That handsome guy, do you know him?

10 months ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieDrum

And this sentence is about shopping???

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaivikThan
DaivikThan
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Shopping for SOs

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshSteine

When you are at the meat market

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anna254943
anna254943
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Talking about a person and calling him 'lo', is a bit frowned upon in Spain as far as I know. It's like you talk about a thing or an object. 'Le conoces?' would be better in this sentence.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuigiMorgan
LuigiMorgan
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That's only in Spain. In most Latin American countries, people always say: "lo." And believe it or not, "lo" is the correct one because we're talking about the direct object of the verb, and "le" is the pronoun used for the indirect object. Two totally different things. Many people think the Spanish spoken in Spain is the best, but it actually isn't.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cubeheater

That cute guy, do you know him? Not accepted

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Report it.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hadzjie
Hadzjie
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Same for 'That pretty boy, do you know him'

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsimonds

Spanishdict translates "cute boy" as -- (el) chico guapo

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sousquark
sousquark
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That fit bloke, you know ‘im?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cumeon
Cumeon
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HAH yaaa m8.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pbmfj
pbmfj
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Sometimes i wonder, am i learning english or spanish?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

Studying Spanish is a really great way to achieve a deeper understanding of English, and those who are doing the reverse tree are here for that very purpose. :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

And this is why it's a national tragedy that American high schools and universities are reducing their language requirements. When I taught at UCLA, the requirement was down to 4 quarters! (ETA this is probably obvious to all, LOL, but I was not teaching a language.)

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Right there with ya

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roeland346394

Indeed!!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H.S.StanVi
H.S.StanVi
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When did chico cease meaning boy????!!!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

I often hear ese tipo (cuate-MX) used for that guy.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roeland346394

Indeed !!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Travis963280

You should accept boy instead of guy

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roeland346394

absolutely

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickLouque

"That handsome fellow" did not fly.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael646944

Nor did "that handsome chap"! Too old fashioned, I suppose.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamiaELSharkawy

Never knew that there was a word called "chap" in English to refer to a "guy" .. that's actually the same pronounce as in Arabic for a guy.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/99butcher99

Do you know that handsome guy not accepted

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

This sentence sounds like something one girlfriend would say to another. "Guy" is accepted now, and this is one of those sentences in which "guy," a very slangy English word, is appropriate. However, "guy" is not used in formal speaking and/or writing.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/99butcher99

To me, that is something that would be said more often than "that handsome guy, do you know him" It would usually be said the other way around. Do you know that handsome guy.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

It would be written the other way. But in spoken speech, we regularly invert phrases, identify the subject or object at some length and then use a pronoun to refer back. "That cute guy, do you know him?" is exactly how young people, particularly teens, talk out loud.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sam529234

This is what it would actually translate to

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H.S.StanVi
H.S.StanVi
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Duo's new definition (for the moment) Chico is guy but not boy. Shame on you

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/18HillOli

Could it be, do you know that handsome guy?, why doesn't is work?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SolonBonif

Could it be like "That handsome boy..."?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/18HillOli

No, guapo is guy, nino is boy!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Actually, guapo simply means handsome (as an adjective) and while 'el niño' means boy 'el chico' can also carry the same meaning. So SolonBonif's answer is correct.

EDIT Interestingly enough, since posting this I have actually learned that sometimes 'guapo' can be used as slang for a guy. So you are correct as well. However, in this sentence the word is an adjective as it describes 'chico'.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Just to add to the confusion, "guapo" is also used as a noun since the gender is already specified by the form of the word. So a correct translation could be "Ese guapo, ¿lo concoces?" DL does NOT accept this usage, but I've heard it a lot in Chicano and Mexican plays. I reported this to DL today.

"El guapo = the cute guy". "La guapa" (though less common) = the cute girl. (Myself, I prefer "cute" to "handsome" because "guapo" is the sort of word teens use. Obviously, DL disagrees.)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickLouque

Is it ok to say "young man" in place of Chico?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I've been told that 'chico' is similar in context to 'lad' in English. 'young man' has kind of replaced the word 'lad' in everyday English so I think you are correct. It might be good to get a second opinion here though.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ampus_Questor
Ampus_Questor
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Well, 'Jack the young man' sounds factual: the person called Jack happens to be a young man. However, 'Jack the lad' carries negative connotations of roguishness, possible drunkenness, possible love 'em and leave 'em with the girls, in other words, a bit of a bounder, if I may use that old-fashioned though picturesque word.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TallRoberto

Handsome young man not accepted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

El joven guapo probable better fits "handsome young man". Just as guapo sometimes becomes a noun in slangy speech, so does joven ("young" or "youth").

21 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ursulias
Ursulias
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DUOLINGO - diologue:

Write this in English

Ese chico guapo, ¿lo conoces?

that pretty guy do you know him

You used the wrong word.

That gorgeous guy, do you know him?

Would "pretty" be considered as wrong, or would it just not be preferred to use?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulCulloty
PaulCulloty
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In English, at least, pretty is generally only used to describe girls or women - the suggestion in calling a guy pretty would be that he was rather effeminate.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsimonds

Or, the phrase "pretty boy" can be used to describe a guy whose success (as an actor or a singer, for example) is due to his good looks rather than his talent. In this case it does not imply that he is effeminate.

13 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyEm1
LadyEm1
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That handsome man do you know him... Man is not accpeted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RG531
RG531
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I put 'handsome chap' just to see if it was acceptable but it wasn't though I think it sounds ok, bit too olde worlde English perhaps.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom254045

That boy is handsome..not excepted

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

It wasn't accepted because it is wrong. The sentence "That boy is handsome" may include the same idea, but that actual phrase doesn't appear in the prompt.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Winter713012

"That handsome man, do you know him?" Not accepted?? What nonsense

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Confusing a "boy" with a "man" will get you arrested you in most states and many countries. It won't seem like "nonsense" when you are in lock-up.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Winter713012

Ah, the correct answer was "that guy" and i forgot chico could also mean boy.

So why would using "guy" and "man" interchangeably get you into legal trouble?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

It wouldn't. I was making a joke about mistaking a boy for a man sexually. But as the saying goes, if you have to explain the joke...

All kidding aside, however, we should avoid a false syllogism constructed from two different languages:

I.e., chico = guy + man = guy, therefore chico = man.

Chico means boy or young man. Maybe close friends make an exception (just as English-speakers may sometimes call a grown male friend a "kid" or "kiddo"), but as a rule a Spanish-speaking male stops being a "chico" sometime in his 20s (if not before).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShirleyWer1

Have to agree with you. My Mexican friends told me they use chico/chica to refer to "teenagers".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Winter713012

Okay interesting. Because in English I say "I made out with some cute boys at a party last night" but if you said the same in Spanish using "Chicos" as boys, it would be interpreted as specifically talking about underage boys?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

No. While chico probably wouldn't be used to refer to me (I'm 64), it doesn't actually have anything to do with the age of sexual consent. I was just joking above.

The word is used for youngish people. Mostly teens, but sometimes twenty-somethings.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/profevirtual
profevirtual
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That handsome boy, do You know him?

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wdssts

Why not man instead of guy?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Technically 'hombre' is 'man' though society often blurs the age ranges for words like this. You certainly could report it if you wanted to.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamsetsetiam

no native english speaker ever talks like the english translation. this lesson is terrible

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Of course we TALK like that. What we don't do in formal communication is WRITE like that.

"The delivery boy from the grocery store, the cute one with the tattoos, have you seen him lately?" Perfectly normal SPOKEN speech, though few of us would write the same syntax. Though we use a keyboard to respond to DL, the program is trying to teach us spoken as well as written Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamantrune
adamantrune
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Hey there is no need to yell (caps) and shoot down your own point at the same time. Notice how you moved the object of the sentence from the beginning after a descriptive term? That is how English speakers talk and write, we never start with "that boy/man/fish" unless it is followed by "is the one that bit me" as a declaritive, in a question the part about biting would be first just like in your example of being in the store.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

In the first place, I wasn't shouting. I capitalized three freakin' words for emphasis. Jeeze! I'm happy to report that since that post, another user explained how to achieve italics and bold here, so I won't need to use all-caps for emphasis except in the unlikely event I need three different forms of emphasis.

As for the rest of your post, it strikes me as overly and unnecessarily literal. But so be it. The "correct" answer per DL is: "That handsome guy, do you know him?"

Let's simplify my example to, "The delivery boy, have you seen him?" Still perfectly common spoken English, but probably not something one would write in a term paper. Which was my point.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woa7dSD5
woa7dSD5
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So how do you get italics and bold here?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Put one asterisk before and after the text you want in italics. Put two asterisks before and after the text you want in bold.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woa7dSD5
woa7dSD5
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¡Gracias, Guillermo!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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I keep this tab http://duolingo.wikia.com/wiki/Formatting open, but really haven't figured out how to do anything other than italics and bolding. Would love to learn how to highlight.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebirdW

Something is wrong with the sentence structure. If there is a comma after guy, the "do you know him is part of the sentence. The question marks should be at the beginning and end of the sentence. If its 2 sentences, there should be a period or exclamation point or something after that guy, and the 2nd sentence starts with a capital D for ¿Do you know him?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

You are incorrectly applying English sentence structure to Spanish. In Spanish you can put the question marks around just the interrogative (question) portion of the sentence. It is still one sentence.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElijahCFGolpe
ElijahCFGolpe
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It sounds like "no conoces", I just wish I got marked down for typo, but I guess hearing that wrong can be a problem. It just really sounded like "no conoces" in the normal speed audio.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It can be a good idea to check with the turtle speed.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipAshf
PhilipAshf
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This translation is grammatically incorrect in English -- and thus not correct.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Read the thread. DL is teaching spoken language, not just formal, written language as one would use for an academic paper. It does the same with the home-language cue or response. There's nothing appalling about "That cute guy, do you know him?" when speaking in either English or Spanish. It makes sense in casual speech to first identify the object of contemplation because "do you know" make no sense until you get the listener's attention focused on the thing about which you want to ask.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Supremistul
Supremistul
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This is what girls used to gossip about me when I was in high school.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

In your dreams. Lol

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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An upvote and a lingot for the guts lol.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.k.a.t.i.e.

This is like drunk English. At least use a semicolon in between thoughts or finish the sentence and start a new one!!!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You do know that Spanish punctuation and English punctuation are different, right? From what I know, the punctuation of this Spanish sentence is spot on.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ozymandias615884

In English a semicolon is used to distinguish between to seperate but not entirely unrelated ideas i.e. 'Cooking ommeletes requires a well greased pan, a spatula and patience; producing Spanish tortillas is contingent on fulfilling the above criteria but with a hot oven at hand to finish.' (Clunky sentence on my part, but I hope it clarifies your dilemna).

5 months ago
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