https://www.duolingo.com/Belagile

H or double vowel?

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If vowel+h is a long vowel and so is a double vowel, then what's the difference? Is there a rule?

3/17/2018, 1:11:22 PM

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tiramisues
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Most of the time it's vowel+h. Double vowels are not as common even kind of rare.

I don't know about any rules for it, but most words with double vowels are from other languages (the ee at the end is from French) or short words or ones where there is a difference between the words depending on how it's written (like mehr (more) and Meer (sea)). But like I said there are not that many and it's probably easier to just learn them than to find a rule that works all the time.

3/17/2018, 1:44:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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Interesting, I never noticed that double vowels were rare in German. English has tons of them. I just did a check of 1891 words that Duo says I have learned and I only found four words, Kaffee, Tee, Meer and Boot. So it really is rare.

3/18/2018, 3:31:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Belagile
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Thank you for your answer! It is greatly appreciated!

3/17/2018, 1:51:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/7hAu0bvY

no, most words with double vowel come from the "niederdeutsch" (lowgerman) which was spoken in the northwest of germany (next to the border to Netherland) in old times. and yes some are from the french as well like gelee etc.

3/17/2018, 2:17:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/tiramisues
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And I said nothing against it. I did say that most words with double vowels came from other languages - I didn't say what those were specifically. And just added an example for the double e at the end as coming from French. I didn't mean that all words came from French, but I chose to show the double e as an example, because unlike with the words from the Netherlands or Niederdeutsch, there is a kind of pattern there with the ending.

3/17/2018, 2:31:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/7hAu0bvY

but: niederdeutsch is not a different language it is a german dialectgroup. so the words do not come from netherland or whatever but from northern germany. i said this couse u said most words with double vowel came from different laguages which is wrong. not most of them, only the ones from the french.

3/17/2018, 2:45:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/tiramisues
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I know it's another word for Platt, but the differences to Standard German are bigger than with other dialects I have heard it referenced as a language. It even has an ISO code and is one of the Amtssprachen in Germany, I just looked it up.

But was that part of the discussion? I just wanted to clarify, what I meant with the example of French words, it doesn't negate the reason why I chose to name French as an example, just because I wanted to name both Niederdeutsch and Netherlands which you mentioned in a sentence.

Edit: Since you edited your whole comment after I commented. https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/Verzeichnis:Deutsch/W%C3%B6rter_mit_verdoppelten_Vokalbuchstaben It says Niederdeutsch, Dutch or French also Latin and English.

You seem to want to fight about a small thing. I don't care enough to fight with you to be honest. In the end it doesn't matter if "most", "quite a few" or "some" words with a double vowel come from other languages. I just wanted to give an example, show some patterns and tell why it's difficult or next to impossible to form a rule.

3/17/2018, 2:55:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/7hAu0bvY

rule? no you have to memorize it. double vowel is rare in german language. so if you just memorize those and write the others with vowel + H you should be fine.

3/17/2018, 1:48:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Belagile
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Thank you for the response!

3/17/2018, 1:54:33 PM
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