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  5. "No, Žofie was worse at it."

"No, Žofie was worse at it."

Translation:Ne, Žofie to uměla hůř.

March 19, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zimowski

Does "Ne, Žofie uměla to hůř" sound ok for native speakers? Or did i forget some rules on the word order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

We do not stress to here and therefore we need it in an unstressed position in the sentence where we also put clitics. However, to can also be stressed, it is not an obligatory clitic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zimowski

Thanks. For me both these sentences sound the same - I can't even tell where the stess is, but I compare it to Russian too much, I think)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kacenka9

It is little awkward. Often there are no set rules yet no native speaker would say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris545852

Sorry for the question, I'm still rather clueless when it comes to Czech grammar.. Why is it huř and not horší?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

hůř is an adverb (how? - belongs to a verb)

horší is an adjective (what kind of? - belongs to noun or pronoun)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephAKr

A proto je to: Ne, Žofie byla v tom horší. Je to správně?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

That is a strange order. Try "Ne, Žofie v tom byla horší.". "v tom" is not a strict clitic, but wants to be in the second position here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephAKr

Supér, díky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

and what about "Ne, Žofie to hůř uměla."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

No, accepting that would be very confusing even though you could invent some very artifficial context where it could make some sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

Thanks for clarifying. I'm still not familiar with the Czech word order and haven't been able to develop a "feel" for it yet.

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