"Mamá siempre nos compra plátanos."

Translation:Mom always buys us bananas.

7 months ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JoeMansley

In english a banana and a plantain are different things. Does this distinction not exist in Spanish, since platano seems to mean both?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liraneitan

I've been to south america, they distinguish between plátanos and bananas

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oruga_fantasma

I think all plantains are bananas, but not all bananas are plantains.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/netwide

I prefer peaches, XD Anyone agree?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkle1027

....really?! ... haha

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenisLever

The correct answer should be''Mom always buys bananas for us.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billyyo
billyyo
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In my area (middle Florida) both Spanish and English speakers call platanos "platanos" and bananas "bananas" and yes they are different.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingAbout
WanderingAbout
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we do not always call our mothers Mom. Need some latitude here. Mama, or Ma, and Mommy are all in use.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/netwide

Or mother

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattRTS
MattRTS
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Same

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sophia475244

You said plantain, it not a banana

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oldestguru
oldestguru
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The plantain is a banana, but different

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rachel687424

I must have learned Mexican Spanish (of course I did, I lived in Southern California), as I've never heard the word "plátano" before. I learned "una banana".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emory908238

Ewwww bananas

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelrathfon

lo mismo

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

Y papá siempre nos compra sandías.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carolynjoy1228

My husband from Mexico says thay his family only uses plátanos. They looked at me like i was crazy when i said bananas. So it could be regional.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkyGreen

Probably. My husband from Honduras uses bananas for the bananas that we call bananas both ripe yellow ones and the green unripe ones that he likes boiled or sliced and fried (tejadas). He uses the word plátanos for the large sweet ones that you fry.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redphillips

"Plantains" are cooking bananas, generally a bit greener and starchier than regular eating bananas. As Duo has now taught us three words for banana (banana, banano, plátano), I figure a little clarification is in order.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billyyo
billyyo
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No, plantains and bananas are different. Here in Kissimmee, Florida you can buy either or both. Both can be eaten green or ripe.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeff481276

Should be plantains, not bananas.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StiDay03

Same same,..... but different,..... but still same

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billyyo
billyyo
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"So you see a bunch of what looks like bananas, but they’re bigger, bright green, and thick-skinned. If you’ve ever raised an eyebrow at this shady looking banana imposter in your market or grocery, your suspicions are correct. These aren’t bananas, they’re plantains.

Plantains are members of the banana family, but they are starchier and lower in sugar, which means that when they are ripe, they will still be green in color. If you get them when they are overripe, they may have started to turn yellow or black. While a banana makes a great, raw on-the-go-snack, plantains aren’t usually eaten raw because of the high starch content.

Native to India and the Caribbean, plantains serve an important role in many traditional diets.When used in cooking they are treated more like vegetables than fruit. You’re most likely to encounter them at your favorite Latin, African, or Caribean restaurant baked, roasted or fried up in the form of a delicious savory side."

1 week ago
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