"High school students"

Translation:高校生たち

March 20, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Flerberderp

Duo we need the on AND the sen readings for all of the kanji. And teach us the kanji, AND the hiragana.

March 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BJCUAl
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I think you mean 'kun' readings.

March 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna30526

onyomi and kunyomi, right?

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BJCUAl
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Affirmative.

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AzoreanEve

they really should always include furigana outside of tests

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna30526

Can't 高校生 be interpreted as plural? As in "high school students are fickle."

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BJCUAl
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Yes. There is nothing specifying singular or plural with Japanese nouns. It must be gleaned from context. Your sentence example would provide ample context.

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SerenellaC7

I thought there is no plural for nouns in Japanese, can someone explain why in this case we add the たち

November 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BJCUAl
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There is no plural specifically indicated in the base noun itself. That is why the plural indicator たち is added.

わたし - Me/I
わたしたち - We/Us
ぼく - Me/I
ぼくら・ぼくたち We/Us
こども - Child/Children
こどもたち - Children (definitively plural)
とり - Bird
とりたち - Birds (definitively plural)

*As 'Me/I' is by default a singular construct it will always be assumed that without adding the plural modifier たち it will be one person.

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LaGoov

Why are there different words with the same meaning?

December 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BJCUAl
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This seems to be more of a 'how' question than a 'why' question. Asking 'why' is likely to lead you into a rabbit-hole that you don't want to go down.

Just take it for granted that Japanese does not use plural inflection. Japanese nouns are by their very nature 'zero plural'.

We have these in English as well: Sheep, fish, shrimp, etc. Yet, we somehow make clear (from context and quantity modifiers) whether we are talking about one, many, or a specific quantity.
'The sheep is', 'The sheep are', 'Some sheep', 'Many sheep', etc.

If this answer is unsatisfactory I would suggest revisiting the question after learning the language, if you still need to or desire to. If you can't wait, there are online resources that might better address your concerns.

December 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EdwardLuja2

高校生 中学生 what is the difference please

March 15, 2019
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