"Těšíš se na mě?"

Translation:Are you looking forward to seeing me?

March 21, 2018

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonCas821536

Please help me to understand how the word seeing is understood here but is not part of the translation in other sentences.

March 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Different languages use different idioms. Sometimes, when you translate every word, the resulting sentence is unnatural. "Těšíš se na mě?" is a common way to tell the same as English "Are you looking forward to seeing me?".

I am trying to come op with a Czech sentence that would also use the verb "vidět"/"to see", but I can't think of many possibilities. "Těšíš se, až se se mnou uvidíš?" is possible and is accepted in the reverse exercise but just ""Těšíš se na mě?" is simply better.

March 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianG1941

Thank you for your very quick respone. Far quicker than other languages i am trying to learn. The query arose from a spoken text to be transcribed. In these instances i cannot distinguish between mě and mně. I assume therefore that in the case of spoken texts it will always be mě.

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Written Czech distinguishes "mě", "mně" and "mne". "Mě" and "mně" sound the same, but have different origins and are used in different grammatical cases. "Mne" is used for the same cases as "mě". See http://prirucka.ujc.cas.cz/?id=j%C3%A1_1

The diacritics (háčeks) are very important for these.

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasBlech

"Are you looking forward to me?" is not possible?

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

"Are you looking forward to me" on its own sounds extremely weird and I would not expect to hear it from a native speaker. It is used as in VladaFu's example, at least in the US, though it could be argued that, even there, it might be more (technically) correct to say, "I am looking forward to YOUR coming again." (That could be another "rule" that has fallen out of fashion, though.)

March 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasBlech

Thanks. BUT the sentence "Everybody is looking
forward to the New Year's Eve party" is correct, isn't it? And there is no gerund at all, which is strictly needed, as VladaFu has written above.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

"I am looking forward to" followed by, say, an event (like Christmas) or an activity (like going to the movies) is perfectly fine. But the construction "I am looking forward to X," where X is a personal pronoun or someone's name, just isn't used.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasBlech

Got it, thank you!

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I can mostly find you in that position if the gerund follows

"I am looking forward to you coming again."

But perhaps it is possible anyway, native speakers might tell us more.

March 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianG1941

Why me and not mne.

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Mne is possible as well. Mě and mne are equivalent, mě is typical for spoken language.

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elephantenlein

Spoken? Can you really distinguish one from another in spoken language?

October 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Yes, mě and mně sound the same, mne sounds differently. Try to listen to some recordings

https://forvo.com/word/mne/#cs

https://forvo.com/word/mn%C4%9B/#cs

https://forvo.com/word/mne/#cs

October 3, 2018
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