https://www.duolingo.com/OddTea

How do you force yourself to think in Esperanto?

March 22, 2018

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMey
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I just do it whenever I think about it. Mostly at work, as I have little else to think about. The hardest part is having enough vocab to keep going. However, that will come with time.

Just try to do it regularly, and don't get self-conscious when messing up because no one will hear your thoughts.

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinKieler

I suggest You should try to read digital sources in Esperanto.

china.org has an Esperanto-Version that is really worth reading. Since it is addressed to Esperanto-speakers around the world, they keep it free from propaganda.

There is also a online Version of a newspaprer called "Monato"

What You need is reading text examples of higher complexity. The short and primitive phrases from the Esperanto course on Duolingo are not sufficient to stimulate your subconcious in a way that you start thinking in Esperanto.

I guess that's all I have to say. But maybe I can give you an example I already used over the internet my-self:


Mi skribis poemon en la formo de la hajko kaj mi uzis plurajn kigojn kiuj povus kaŭzi multan konfuzon.

Nature mi volus aŭdi vian opinion. Kion diras mia poemo al vi?

La lumo luna kuŝas kiel neĝo sur la haŭto nuda

Kigo estas japana vorto kaj signifas "vorto de la sezono". La ĉefa tasko de kigoj estas indiki la sezonon de la momenta esprimo priskribata en la hajko.

La luno estas signo por la aŭtuno, la neĝo implicas la vintron nature kaj nudeco signifas la someron en japana poezio.

La konfuzo en mia poemo estas la uzado de simboloj por aŭtuno kaj vintro en la unuaj du linioj de mia verko kaj la somera metaforo en la lasta frazo. Se oni ne konas la regulojn de hajko ĝi ne estas speciale konfuzanta por la leganto.


Mi proponas ke la homaro uzas konstruitan lingvon por la komunikado en la tuta mondo kaj mi esperas ke vi faros la saman.

:-)

March 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/karasu4
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In order to become more comfortable with it? You must of course get a solid vocab and control of the grammar before you can do any coherent speaking, writing, or thinking for that sake.

If you don't have anyone to practise speaking it with, which would of course be ideal, you could try to make a habit of speaking out loud things you are thinking, plans you are making, etc., in Esperanto. I can't really see the point of just thinking in the language.

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMey
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No point of thinking in the language?! How are you going to understand how someone thinks in a language if you never do that yourself? Thinking in a foreign language is insanely helpful and great, risk-free practice for trying out new vocab and toying with grammar.

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/karasu4
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See your point, but by just thinking in the language I meant that it needn't be a goal in itself, especially not if you must 'force' yourself to it in any way.

If you become a fluent speaker, you'll become a fluent thinker, very naturally. Speaking out loud your thoughts will at least help you rehearse pronounciation, and you'll more easily hear yourself making mistakes. Sure no one hears your thoughts, but that also means no one will correct them.

Mentally rehearsing grammar and vocab is of course both necessary and good, but if I understand correctly, we're talking about making coherent thoughts in Esperanto, as you normally do in your first language?

Anyway, as long as you keep learning, it will start happening all by itself, sooner or later. You'll probably even find yourself speaking Esperanto in your dreams, which can be pretty fun to realise upon waking up.

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jdroege

The most interesting thing about thinking in a different language is the fact that you can "think" some things in other languages which are very difficult in your native language. Try thinking about "mallakto" in English ... Try Googling Sapir-Worff Hypothesis ...

March 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirson8

I have two methods that potentially can work in any language: 1. Describe what you see, what you do etc. Describe everything around you. 2. Imagine that you have a Esperanto friend. What would you tell him in Esperanto?

You can actually use both at the same time. Don't worry if you don't know some words. You can just work around by describing that missing word, or just left it "blank" and try with other sentences.

March 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Alkanadi

I think it comes in time. I still think in English though.

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EsperantoHundo

There is a good pdf book at http://edukado.net/ called Esperanto per 501 Vortoj. It is completely in Esperanto, but uses a very small vocabulary. It has small pictures to help your comprehension. I read a little bit, then start riffing on the phrases. By that I mean saying them in other ways, or describing the drawings more completely. You don't have to force yourself. It will come naturally as the scenario seems simple.

April 18, 2018
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