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"The baby just ate."

Translation:El bebé recién comió.

5 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NicoAdams2

Why is recién before comió? In English it's equally valid to say "the baby ate recently" and "the baby recently ate". What's the rule about recién here?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken776594

How would one use acabo de?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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El bebé acaba de comer.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacnew
jacnew
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Why isn't "El bebé acaba de comer" accepted?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VJ-K
VJ-K
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Perhaps not included in the database yet.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Why don't they say The baby has just eaten?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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The distinction between "The baby just ate" and "The baby has just eaten" is subtle without adding more to the sentence (e.g. "ten minutes ago" only fits with the first one). Is the distinction between "recién comió" and "acaba de comer" quite clear even on their own?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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If there is no definite time expression, the use of present perfect is more adequate. If we say when (definite time) the action happened in the past, we use the simple past.

In Spanish something similar happens with the pretérito indefinido and the pretérito perfecto, at least in some countries. The difference between "recién comió" and "acaba de comer" is geographical. They mean the same.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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I believe the distinction between "just ate" and "has just eaten" to also have a strong geographic component. The former is more common overall in published texts (cf. Google NGrams).

If the distinction between "recién comió" and "acaba de comer" is merely geographical, then it would seem both should be accepted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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In fact, in some places the present perfect and the pretérito perfecto are endangered tenses, almost extinct! What a pity!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/um6661138
um6661138
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why wasn't "el baby acaba de comer," accepted?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/um6661138
um6661138
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jajajaja- never mind..... it's bc i wrote 'baby'. whoops.... : )

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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The baby has just eaten

El bebé acaba de comer

Present perfect with just = acabar de + infinitive in Spanish

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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I entered "recien" and DL marked it wrong.

1 week ago