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  5. "The farmers are wounded."

"The farmers are wounded."

Translation:Los campesinos están heridos.

March 25, 2018

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaviFernan

Why not granjeros?

March 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vcornejo

"Agricultores" tambien.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ecedenyo

granjeros should be taken as good answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elvolcanchapin

pues ya se acepta 'granjeros'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather16457

Why is estar used in the present and ser used in the past for the same sentence construction?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

This is confusing because the English is often ambiguous and Spanish has two different words for the verb "to be."

In this sentence, we're merely connecting the subject "the farmers" with an adjective "injured" via the copular verb "are."

If you use "ser" to translate this sentence, then you are using the passive voice and describing what happened to them. That is, the passive voice says "the farmers are injured (by someone/something)."

If you use "estar" to translate this sentence you are just describing the condition of the farmers. This is not the passive voice.

What makes it doubly confusing is that Spanish also uses "ser" to describe people when speaking of characteristics or intrinsic qualities. If you wanted to describe the farmers as lazy, for example, you'd say "los granjeros son perezosos." If you used "estar," you'd be implying they are acting lazy now, but aren't generally lazy.

With past participles, I believe it's the case that "ser" is only used in passive voice constructions and "estar" is always used to describe states. That's why "he's dead" is "él está muerto" even though death is generally considered a permanent state and not just a temporary condition. If there are exceptions to this, I'd love to hear about them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanneBrown1

I don't understand this either, it's driving me demented!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnalieDuol

It wouldn't accept granjeros for me either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveAwl

Yes, I too don't understand why "granjeros" isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobZhurunkle

Granjeros accepted May 18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shichi-astre

uhm granjeros should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elvolcanchapin

I wish there was a way to better differentiate between granjero and campesino as farmers in English. They don't necessarily mean the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gnosto

Okay... I'm new to this beautiful language... is this sentence written in the progressive present?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shichi-astre

no. theres nothing progressive about it.

the farmers are wounded

wounded is used as an adjective and its a past participle


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hnojpena

Por qué están heridos los campesinos? Querían hacerse pasar como granjeros o qué?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaldPrid

Campesinos= peasants; farmers= granjeros farmers= agricultores, campesino is not synonomous with farmer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaldPrid

Not all farmers are peasants. I believe dl is absolutely wrong this time.

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