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"Is it snowing?"

Translation:Est-ce qu'il neige ?

March 28, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikaBaby

I wrote "est-ce qu'il neige?" Then hovered over the words to check and saw it had "est" so I changed it to "est-ce qu'il est neige?" and duh I got it wrong -___-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

Just remember that you can form a question simply by putting "est-ce que" before a statement. So that "il neige" (it is snowing) becomes "est-ce qu'il neige ?" (is it snowing?). Note that in "il neige", it is only French present tense. It doesn't have a special present continuous tense. So the French present tense if often translated as either Simple Present or Present Continuous in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saeed.Almesfer

Thank you.. your replies always helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amanda105402

Neige-t-il? Why is that incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Debbie545924

I wrote 'neige t-il" and it was correct. My french husband gave me this term instead of Est-ce qu-il neige.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhfenton

Indeed. I received an email on June 19 that the suggestion of "Neige-t-il ?" had been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RakeshSing237024

Can it be Y a t'il neige ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruziskey2283

The direct translation of what you wrote is: "is there snowing?" Does that sound right to you? "Il y a" means "there is" or "there are", so you would only use it if you are trying to express that something exists, and not to say "it's snowing". The same rule applies in English to a lot of weather-related verbs. English also has the verbs "to snow", "to rain", etc., and saying, "It's snowing" is different in English from saying, "there is snow". If you wanted to say, "there's snow" in French, it would translate to: "Y a-t-il de la neige ?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatherineR302125

Y a t'il neige ? Y a t'il ? Please tell me where I am going wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruziskey2283

The direct translation of what you wrote is: "is there snowing?" Does that sound right to you? "Il y a" means "there is" or "there are", so you would only use it if you are trying to express that something exists, and not to say "it's snowing". The same rule applies in English to a lot of weather-related verbs. English also has the verbs "to snow", "to rain", etc., and saying, "It's snowing" is different in English from saying, "there is snow". If you wanted to say, "there's snow" in French, it would translate to: "Y a-t-il de la neige ?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elusis

I am trying to understand this "est-ce que" construction from the perspective of an English speaker. I'm starting to think of it as meaning "[question]..." but I'm not sure that always leads me to the right translation when I'm going English to French. Is there a rule about when to use "est-ce que" versus an inversion with "t"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruziskey2283

Inverting the verb and the subject is the more formal way or polite way to ask the question. It's hard to compare both forms to English since the non-inverted forms of most of the questions you can ask in the English language just sound off, (think of "is it snowing?" vs "it is snowing?"). Est-ce que means "is it that", meaning the direct translation of "est-ce qu'il neige" is "is it that it is snowing", but obviously that is not usually an acceptable form of a question in English, so we just understand it as "is it snowing?"

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