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"J'ai eu un pyjama rose pour mon anniversaire."

Translation:I got pink pajamas for my birthday.

March 28, 2018

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrishWilczak

I do not understand the difference between I had and I got in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claude295345

I think that is because it is a gift . " I received ..." is accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rogerthecat

I say 'I had it for my birthday' when it was a gift. I don't get why it was marked wrong either, TrishWilczak


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/W-Ruggles-Wolfe

This sentence confused me as well. I had to look it up.

I suspect they are using «avoir» in the sense of «obtenir»/"to get". Look for the 2nd entry under "vt"/"transitive verb" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul882324

I do not think that there is any 'intended' difference here between "had" and "got". It's merely typical of the difference between UK and US English usage, rather than, as sometimes happens, Duo requiring us to "second guess" some obscure grammatical point. Perhaps a moderator can confirm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdiKlil

Ta famille ne t'aime pas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norapal1

Why is pajama plural in the English translation ? un is singular!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jered78

Because in English the garment is inherently plural, "pajamas", much like "jeans". In French you would say "un jean" but you would never say in English, "I am wearing a jean" -- you would say "jeans" or "a pair of jeans".

The name for a noun of this type is plurale tantum, and French has them too. For example, you would not wear "la lunette" on your eyes, but you would wear "les lunettes".

An example in the other direction, in English you might ask "Where is the restroom?" (singluar) but in French you would always say " Où sont les toilettes ? "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claude295345

" Où sont les toilettes ?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankie100828

Exactly very confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeJeal

An ugly sentence to British ears. "I had" is a correct translation of "j'ai eu" and sounds much better to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul882324

Hi GraemeJeal. You’re right - « I had », or perhaps even more literally correct, « I have had », would be a more subtle and less ‘grating’ UK English translation. We are supposed to be learning French here, as moderators are continually reminding us, but nevertheless, accurate translation of the French into the most accurate English useage is still, IMHO, important. «got » is somehow less definitive. As for « gotten », we’d best draw a veil over that suggestion….. ;-) (Best « for » « gotten ») ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagen

Never did I think that I would learn american as well! What a bad bad bad sentence! Got! Pajamas! Neither french nor english is my first language, but this is just bad language even to my foreign ears! It may well be correct for those living in the US, but for those, like me, who speak british english this sentence is bad! Also, why on earth is the translation 'i have had' wrong? J'ai eu is I have had? yes ?? Please can someone help me out here? Sitesurf???Please??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/louisemathias0

"I had pink pyjamas...." should be allowed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grandma714783

I had for my birthday implies being given it. We also use the phrase pair of pyjamas as well as pair of trousers and pants. Pants are worn under trousers in england


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaMundy1

"I got" is a horrible expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul882324

Hi LindaMundy1. You’re right. In this context, « got » is not attractive English. But – IMHO, it pales into insignificance beside the appalling modern (and, to me, downright offensive), « Can I get.... », instead of the traditional and polite, « Please may I have…. ». The two phrases don’t even have the same meaning – but that’s probably well above the understanding of those who offend !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wwangduolingo

It's quite hard for me to get the 'eu' from the audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul882324

Salut wwangduolingo. Worry not – you are one of hundreds, if not thousands, who have issues with Duo’s synthesised speech on this course!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabbidon6

I do not understand why ‘I had pink pyjamas .... ‘ is not accepted. ‘Got’ seems to me an Americanism which is taking over the language: I got hit, I got pregnant, I got a present, I got on the bus, I got sick, I got to go now .... but generally it is mostly used in the UK by less literate adults and children. ‘I had’ in the sense of ‘I received’ seems acceptable, surely?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dianelane2

We were taught not to say, I got, when we were young, bad English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul882324

gobybicycle commented on "J'ai eu un pyjama rose pour mon anniversaire."

We, the UK, should start up our own single market duolingo. I'm sure it'll be a huge success in a very selective sort of way. One which allows no tolerance for fluidity of language and specializes in toilets, pants, and dropping "the." Let's dun get those childish, less literate adults outta our forums!

Salut gobybicycle. - whoever you are, and wherever you may be. So sad when people play at ‘ghost posting’!

OK – absolutely with you on your mission. There are, however, one or two snags. Firstly, you need the ‘connections’ to seed-fund the enterprise (I’m talking intellectually, as well as financially, here). It would help if, like Duo’s founders, you just happened to have well paid secure tenure in US universities to help you with this little ‘sideline’.

When you have convinced enough well-meaning and naive helpers to support your ‘mission’ by starting to ‘build’ your core courses (without any pay, of course), then you can start to ‘go public’.

You’ll need one or two ideas as to how your project will actually make money for your ‘seed’ investors. They won’t work, but, hey – by then, people are ‘committed, aren’t they?

As the proposition grows, (which is particularly attractive to those who will willingly give their help and time and expertise without financial reward) you can start to think about commercial reality. And – whoo, hoo – an ‘exit strategy’! Forget the needs of students. Forget the accuracy of translations. Who cares? There’s a stock market flotation in the offing for the ‘spare-bedroom’ business that, despite never having made a penny profit in nearly a decade, is now, miraculously, worth seven hundred million bucks, with a staff of a couple of hundred, paid, on average, over a hundred grand a year each.

Nice work if you can get it!

However – as far as a UK–centric ‘Duo’ is concerned, forget it. The present route to which the UK is politically committed will leave the historical home of the English language as a mere footnote in the dusty annals of future history.

(Apologies to anyone who thought I went a bit ‘off-topic’ there ;-)

Bonne journée.

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