"There are Ainu people in Japan."

Translation:日本にはアイヌの人たちがいます。

March 28, 2018

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/James151779

Two questions (for my enlightenment): First, why the "ha" after the "ni"? Does the "ni" not indicate "in Japan"? And second, given the issue of singular vs. plural (or lack thereof), is the "tachi" necessary to denote "people"? Certainly without it, the sentence could be read "There is an Ainu person in Japan." - but could the same sentence not be read the other way as well? Tnx, jmk

March 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryPeter98
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には basically means 'in', but it puts emphasis on 日本 For the Ainu People you can use アイヌ人、アイヌの人々、or アイヌの人たち(ainu jin, ainu no hitobito, or ainu no hitotachi) and they're all ok to use Hope it helps

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/James151779

So "people" can be with or without deliberate pluralization. As for the "には", just don't recall having ever seen that construct before. Thanks...

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ayamedori

Maybe it helps to think of "には" not as a seperate particle, but as a combination of に and は, に defining the place and は the topic (translated as "as for" or "regarding"). That way, the sentence becomes "as for in Japan, there are Ainu people."

Compare that to 日本にアイヌの人たちがいます. Rather than 日本, the topic becomes アイヌの人たち: "Ainu people are in Japan." In the end the two sentences mean the same thing, but it's the topic that's different.

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/James151779

That makes sense. I must admit that I am still having trouble with some more complex sentences determining which is the topic vs. object vs. subject. Probably because it causes old nightmares from grade school (MANY decades ago), diagramming hundreds of sentences for the night's homework. <G> Thanks...

March 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Tara_han

Simply 日本にアイヌがいます was accepted.

August 8, 2018
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