https://www.duolingo.com/JelaynaGrace

How long did it take you to speak fluent Irish? (or where you are now

Comment how long it took you to speak Irish fluently (or your current level) and your experience.

Thank you,

11 months ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/John942274

Well, I've been at it for 167 days now. I reached Level 25 a couple of weeks ago, and I amagine I'll finish the tree for Irish in another 6 weeks or so. I wouldn't say that I'm in any way fluent. I hope to get over to Ireland later this year and be able to have some personal instruction from an Uncle who is a native speaker, and an Aunt who has just retired as a school teacher.
I've tried other methods of learning some Irish, but Duolingo has definitely been the best that I have found personally. The Now You're Talking videos on YouTube are also very good, but teach the Ulster (Donegal) dialect, which is different in some ways from the Official Version taught on Duolingo.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JelaynaGrace

Thank you for commenting... Wow Id say your a fast learner for your level and the amount of days you have been doing Irish. I know some people who are still not level 20 and have been or four years!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John942274

Well, I don’t know about fast. Anytime I have five minutes, I do a lesson or a review on the phone app. I try to go over the verbs and adverbs the most, and I’ll do some of the easier lessons when I’m tired or want a break.
Good luck to you and keep at it!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
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John942274, while there is a CO (official standard) in writing, there is no such standard in pronunciation. The version in Now You're Talking is just as good as the version taught be Duolingo -- better probably, because the series was written by Éamonn Ó Dónaill, probably the best grammarian in Ireland, and everything taught in the series is correct Irish, which is not the case for Duolingo. I don't want to start a silly argument about dialects, just reassure you that the Irish in that series is perfectly acceptable.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windsaw

I am now about one and a half years into learning Irish having finished my tree about half a year ago. When it comes to hearing, my guess is I am about two or three percent fluent. I pick up familiar words here and there and if I pay close attention I am usually able to figure out the topic. But that's about it. It is simply too fast. As for simple school texts I would say I am about 20% fluent when it comes to reading. I understand the meaning of the sentences and when I can read most of them if I pay close attention and go over them twice sometimes. Usually there are one or two words I do not understand. Still: fluency implies being able to read effordlessly and I am still far from that. When it comes to more advanced texts like in newspapers, I estimate I am about 5% fluent. I am not always able to guess the topic of a sentence and I am missing some two or three words per sentence. When sentences are long I am usually completely lost. Don't get me started on speaking fluency. I have no idea where I am standing there since I have no way of practicing. My guess is about four percent. But I guess it would improve quickly giving practice.

BTW, I still think I am making decent progress. To think I would get further in that short amount of time without any immersion would be hopelessly optimistic.

PS: I once asked my Japanese teacher how log it takes a japanese student to read a newspaper easily. He said about eight years. And that is for a native whol already knows the language!

PPS: I hate that "fluency" feature that other languages have in Duolingo with a passion.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/richard547513
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Which newspapers do you read in Irish? I am only familiar with seactain which used to be foinse and comes free in the irish independant every wednesday

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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There are a number of online publications such as https://nos.ie/ and https://tuairisc.ie/ available.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john285263

I'm Irish but only just recently started using duolingo. As a kid, I went through the Irish education system but didn't do well. I live in China now and speak Chinese very well but only due to my own efforts to speak it with the locals. If I return to Ireland i would hope to become fluent in Irish too, particularly by speaking as often as possible, where i think my education completely failed on this point.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ficus12
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I’ve been at it on and off for about a year and a half. I am by no means fluent, and I still struggle with pronunciation, but I find I can understand more and more things written, and seen on Irish television. It just takes time, how much varies on the individual.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JelaynaGrace

Thx for commenting! Thats kind of how I am right now also.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chromalogue
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I have been at it for about a year and a half. I can read and understand, but not pronounce, roughly a dozen words.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JelaynaGrace

Thanks for commenting. Id say thats fine if you can only read as of now since you started so little ago.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greta868458

I've been learning for about 6 months, just fitting in Duolingo and other short courses around a busy life. I'm still a beginner, but feel like I am slowly making progress. Watching TG4 and listening to songs sung in Irish is also helping.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JelaynaGrace

Thanks for commenting. I am also listening to songs and shows and they seem to be helping also!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

I've only been here for 17 days and was delighted with being able to read road signs over the weekend. I felt quite giddy about it, pointing things out to my husband. I started learning because I want to help my children with their homework. We get letters from their school - one side is English and the other side is Irish. It was complete gobbledegook before, but I'm excited that I'm able to get a general idea of what the letter is about without reading the English side first. I clearly have a very long way to go, but it's encouraging to know I'm making progress. The only problem is pronunciation. I live in Munster, and my neighbour pronounces things quite differently to the way I've been learning here. It makes things a bit awkward when I try to speak to him in Irish.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyjaMay

Honestly, I don’t think I’ll ever be fluent.

11 months ago
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