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  5. "La charcuterie est au coin."

"La charcuterie est au coin."

Translation:The deli is on the corner.

March 28, 2018

22 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YaBigBen

"The deli is nearby" ou bien " The deli is on the corner" sont des traductions similaires.Duolingo devrait les accepter toutes les deux.Qu'en pensez-vous ?

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1808

"Au coin" = on/at/around the corner. "Dans le coin" = nearby, in the area. The meanings are indeed similar but this is how they are generally translated.

February 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

In English, "The deli is nearby" and "The deli is on the corner" are extremely different statements. There would be no English-based reason to assume one is a valid translation only because the other one is.

So this question returns to French: what does "au coin" mean? Does it mean "nearby"; does it mean "on the corner"; or does it mean either depending on context? As discussed elsewhere in this thread, "Dans le coin" has a meaning of "nearby": http://www.wordreference.com/fren/dans%20le%20coin. I haven't seen a source that points to "au coin" having a similar meaning, but that's hardly dispositive.

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wgsimon

Deli is a bad translation as a delicatessen is not restricted to selling charcuterie. Also charcuterie in France is more often used to refer to the products themselves rather than a specialist shop.

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1808

The Oxford French Dictionary includes "delicatessen" as one possible definition for "une charcuterie" (also Larousse, WordReference, Reverso). It may refer to a separate store which sells cooked (pork) meat products or it may refer to a department within a larger store, e.g., un supermarché, which would be called a "deli" or "deli counter". Context will tell you if it refers to a store/department (une charcuterie) or the product itself (de la charcuterie).

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

The translation obviously loses some nuance, but the question is what would one propose instead? There are obviously issues teaching very culturally-infused terms like "charcuterie" or "tartine" in a translation-based course, but for whatever reason they elected to take on that particular challenge. If you try to use "charcuterie" as a shop in English, a meaning (surprisingly to me) present in the dictionary, you've certainly gone well outside the bounds of familiar English for many, if not the vast, vast majority.

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/W-Ruggles-Wolfe

For me, I'd rather have the concept introduced via something like: "They set out the deli meats/cold cuts for lunch."

It gets to the essence of the definition (and avoids the deli shop/merchant specialization complication).

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

As far as I know, the team has no control over what sentence is the first one in which you are introduced to a word. They just write sentences. Algorithms determine which sentences show up where and how often. But if a sentence like that were the first one you saw, you'd still have the difficulty of introducing this meaning, which isn't as shared with English. You'd have people wanting to say "The lunch meats are on the corner" or something ;)

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/W-Ruggles-Wolfe

Interesting to know re: word introduction order.

And after I had typed the above, I encountered the (Il y a aussi de la charcuterie au supermarché. - There are also cold meats in the supermarket.) pairing.

Combined with "La charcuterie est au coin", things are generally covered.

Life is never dull.

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lhb24tuc

I would never in a million years call a charcuterie a deli or describe it to someone in English as a deli. I have heard native Parisians describe a charcuterie as a "sausage shop," so I tried that, despite knowing it sells more than sausages, and was marked wrong. The very fact that in reverse, a deli translates best as "épicerie fine" is a big hint that a little more leniency should be granted for translations of charcuterie.

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wanda655505

And then, what's a deli called?

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1808

A delicatessen (deli) may be "une épicerie fine" or "une charcuterie". Confirmed by five French dictionaries (Oxford, WR, Collins, Larousse, Reverso).

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wgsimon

'Une épicerie fine' or 'un traiteur'.

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeaDavis2

Could you make up your mind: I've used both 'on the corner' and 'nearby' and both were marked WRONG

April 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiff382466

Sometimes in this lesson the phrase is translated as the deli is "nearby" and sometime "on the corner" in each case the one of the answers is counted as incorrect.n

May 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/louisemathias0

The english translation of "La charcuterie est au coin" is given as "The deli is nearby" earlier in the exercise. It should be accepted here. You cannot give it as the correct translation in one place but refuse it as a translation elsewhere. You have to be consistent.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoubleLingot
  • au coin de la rue - at/on the corner of the street
  • l’aventure est au coin de la rue - adventure can be found on any street corner

  • dans le coin (= aux alentours) - in the area, nearby

  • tu habites dans le coin ? - do you live round here?
  • je ne suis pas du coin - I’m not from round here
August 31, 2019
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