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  5. "Elles ont des robes."

"Elles ont des robes."

Translation:They have dresses.

March 29, 2018

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phatup31

This has the article des so why isnt it Ce not Elles? Different rule between sont and ont?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Yes, the rule only applies with the verb "être" (to be). That's why it's often called "c'est vs il est".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smatprabby

Thank you! Not sure how I missed this rule, but I've just come from a long discussion about "Ils/elles sont" vs "ce sont," in which this very useful information did not appear. Maybe I missed it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Well, if it was about "ils/elles sont" vs "ce sont" it sort of was there, in that it explicitly used "sont" (conjugation of être), but perhaps not explicitly stated. I can't say for sure since there's more than one long discussion on the subject and I don't know which you're referring to! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smatprabby

I had thought maybe it did have something to do with the verb. You confirmed it. Merci.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sesnic

So, only etre uses Ce in front of the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Yes, only être changes "il/elle est" to "c'est"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan877822

I find the speaker for this particularly difficult to understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADRIANKLOS2

agree wholeheartedly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeNesbitt1462

Does anyone else think this pronunciation is incorrect? With the second 'e'sound in elles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saurabhseh2

I heard "elles sont des robes". Is this sentence correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

No, because in that sentence "elles sont" would have to change to "ce sont". "Il/Elle est + modified noun" changes to "c'est + modified noun". "Il/Elle est + adjective" stays "il/elle est + adjective". This only occurs with the verb "être" (to be), with all other verbs you use the pronoun.

Take a look at these links:
https://www.thoughtco.com/french-expressions-cest-vs-il-est-4083779
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrudenceFi

I'm confused with elles and elle one being they and the other she


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

I don't get it. You say you're confused, yet you do know the difference between them. "Elle" is the singular feminine pronoun, so "she"; "elles" is the plural feminine pronoun, so "they".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah950716

This is probably the hardest level of French I did so far. I keep confusing the sentence "elles ont des robes" as "ce ont des robes" or "ils ont des robes."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"elles ont des robes" means that "they", a group composed entirely of females or grammatically feminine things/animals, have (some) dresses. "ils ont des robes" means that "they", a group with at least one man or grammatically masculine thing/animal, have (some) dresses. Both translate to "They have (some) dresses" in English, because English doesn't have the distinction between feminine and masculine that French does.

"ce ont des robes" is grammatically incorrect and doesn't mean anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmarachiAn3

Why do you add "des"? Why not go as "elles ont robes". It will be perfect translation for "they have dresses"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoconutMilk24601

Well, as was stated earlier, des is a french word that dosnt translate exacly to english. Its just a form of french grammer. It says that they have more than one dress without saying how many they have. A very vauge translation of the word would be "some" idk if any of that made since but i hope it helped ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/excellence2018

I would personally ONLY CONSIDER inserting "some" into the English translation when the innately plural French partitive articles (articles partitif) of "du" [masculine], "de la" [feminine], "de l'" [for nouns/objects beginning with a French vowel or silent "h" or "y", of either gender] are used; and they are only used before UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS OR OBJECTS such as water, wine, bread or cake etc (especially when no unit of measure is given to them such as a bottle(s), a glass(es), a loaf/loaves).

Countable nouns such as dresses use the indefinte articles of "un", "une" for singular masculine or feminine nouns/objects respectively and "des" for plural numbers of nouns/objects of either gender. Note that in the latter use of "des", inserting "some" into the English translation is optional or even odd/misleading!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaquelSoli39094

How do you know when to put ce and when to put the pronoun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"Il/Elle est + modified noun" changes to "c'est + modified noun". "Il/Elle est + adjective" stays "il/elle est + adjective". This only occurs with the verb "être" (to be), with all other verbs you use the pronoun.

Take a look at these links:
https://www.thoughtco.com/french-expressions-cest-vs-il-est-4083779
https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/french-grammar/cest-versus-il-elle-est


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvAk695045

When do we pronounce the s of elles?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

When the next word begins with a vowel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia_Gaines

Why is it not 'some' dresses? Des!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"some dresses" is accepted, but while "des" is required in French, "some" is not in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekHarper

So wait, "the women" don't have dresses? Even though the sentence uses a female article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"they" aren't necessarily women. They could be girls, for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekHarper

Sure, they could be girls, but that possibility doesn't invalidate "the women have dresses." If the app is using a female pronoun, then I would think "the women," the girls," "the females," "the ladies" or practically anything similar would be valid.

I mean, I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

I think you missed the point. It's not that "they" can't mean women. It's that we're not told what "they" are, so we don't try to guess what "elles" are and translate to a noun, we translate to the equivalent English pronoun, "they". You only translate to "the women", "the girls", etc. if the French sentences has "les femmes", "les filles"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekHarper

Ah, okay, thanks for clearing that up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADRIANKLOS2

listen to the difference between the Lady pronouncing the "R" clearly and the Gentleman making it difficult by hiding it as is his habit. Does he lisp ?

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