"Les poneys sont gentils avec les enfants."

Translation:The ponies are good with children.

March 29, 2018

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/_M_M_.

Should "gentle" not work here?

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

No, "gentle" is "doux".

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NezihD
  • 1197

I am not native English speaker. Can't we use kind with animals? "the ponies are kind with the children" not accepted.

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

It is now. :)

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ian116730

Nez I am a native English speaker and I said kind and it was not accepted 8dec18

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

What was the rest of your sentence?

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/frudolf1

why not kids? there are so many exercises where kids is accepted, why here the system only accepts children?

April 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

Since the new tree, we now teach "gamin(e)(s)", so we enforce "enfants" = "children" and "gamin(e)s" = "kids" now. There are still some sentences where "kids" is accepted but we're removing it when we come across it.

April 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

From experience, I'd take a guess and say 'kids' is used far more often than 'gamins/gamines' in French. It's very frustrating to keep getting every sentence with 'enfants' wrong because 'kids' is marked wrong, as if kids and children denote two completely different entities. Why not just accept it as a synonym? You can keep the default suggestion of 'children', and you don't even need to offer 'kids' as a suggestion when hovering over the word. Please do reconsider.

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

The thing is, "gamin(e)(s)" is less formal than "enfant(s)" in French, and the same applies to "kids" and "children". How are you going to learn that difference if we accept both "kids" and "children" everywhere? If we taught you that "enfants" means "kids", would you really understand the difference when we teach you "gamins" later?

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ChiNane

I second that.

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/FrancesOsb1

when i use sympa i'm wrong and when i use gentil i'm wrong, but they are used in other sentences, sometimes translated as one and sometimes the other

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

Did you use "gentil" or "gentils"? It has to be "gentils" in this sentence to agree with "poneys".

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandib67

How does one know when to use the article, "the" or not? I'm confused. Why not "The ponies"?

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

That's precisely what the default translation says: "The ponies are good with children."

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007

Well, for me, the confusion is sometimes DL wants the, and sometimes not. In this sentence, would The ponies are good with the children be accepted? A few sentences back, The giraffe eats leaves was NOT accepted, whereas DL wanted The giraffe eats the leaves. Above, les infants is translated as children. Can someone explain this.. when to use the, versus no the?

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

Generalities use the definite article. So do specificities. So if you want to say that the ponies are good with children in general, you use the definite article, and if you want to say that the ponies are good with these specific children, you use the definite article. If you want to say that the ponies are good with some children without specifying which children, you use "des".

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007

Well, above, les poneys=the ponies. les enfants=children. So how are we to understand when to use the, versus no the? I am still not getting it, maybe it would help for you to put sample sentences beside your explanations? For example, Ponies are good with the children. The ponies are good with children. The ponies are good with the children. Ponies are good with children. Are these all correct for the sentence above?

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

In this sentence, both "les poneys" and "les enfants" could be either specific or general, without context we don't know (so we accept "[the/] ponies" and "[the/] children" in any combination).

Examples:

  • J'aime la pizza - specific "I like the pizza" (the one you made this morning).
  • J'aime la pizza - general "I like pizza" (it's one of my favourite foods).
  • Les enfants sont petits - specific "The children are small" (your children and my children).
  • Les enfants sont petits - general "Children are small" (as a rule, most children are).

In most cases, you probably won't know for sure which meaning is meant without the context Duo doesn't provide. In real life, context will make it clear. Unfortunately there's no way for us to provide a context here on Duo, so as a general rule (note that there may be some exceptions) we accept both with and without "the".

Does that help?

I don't remember the giraffe sentence, I'll look for it and see if I can find what happened. It's possible there's a missing translation.

EDIT: OK, found. In that sentence, we're talking about what one specific giraffe is eating, not the usual dietary habits of giraffes. If the sentence were "Les girafes mangent les feuilles', that could be either "The giraffes eat the leaves" (the specific ones) or "The giraffes eat leaves" (that's their usual food). But because the sentence is about one specific giraffe, it's not really a generalisation, so must use the specific "the".

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007

And also, what about the giraffe sentence, I have the same issue with that one..

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/La_Mariette

This is where I get stuck with "les" and "des" again. I wanted to say "des enfants". We would say "Le géant mange des enfants" and then "des enfants" would signify children in general.

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

No, generalities are expressed with the definite article in French. For example:

Je mange du chocolat - I am eating (some) chocolate, I eat chocolate (every day when I come home from work)
Je mange le chocolat - I eat chocolate (in general)

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/La_Mariette

So, if I wanted to say "I don't eat meat because I am a vegetarian", would that be "Je ne mange pas la viande..."?

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

Right!

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/La_Mariette

Oh! Thank you!

November 25, 2018
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