"It is not your turn yet."

Translation:Du bist noch nicht dran.

March 31, 2018

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Aeon859718

I do not understand this at all. This is completely unexpected. This translation shouldn't even come up this early if it's not explained first.

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/naturallymitch

Seriously. It just comepletely jumps into a completely unexplained mixture of words. Even as a native English speaker, it just doesn't translate properly.

November 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Fredrik814103

Right! the word 'dran' isn't even represented by the translations of any of the given English words in the English sentence.

December 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/c.a.sid
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Literally I think you could say this means: "You are still not up." But that doesn't sound natural in English so we switch it around a bit.

April 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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It's more like "not up yet". Same meaning, but different emphasis.

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pasikaunisto

Why is noch before nicht?

May 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Heather_Watkins
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I'm not positive, but I think that 'nicht' has to appear directly before 'dran', so there's really nowhere else for 'noch' to go here.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaConwa4

I am pretty confused with dran, auch. It seems to me, a better translation for dran, would be next.
Du bist dran. You are next. Bin ich richtig?

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/c.a.sid
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I think of it as "up", as in, "you're up!" - we don't really have an adjective for 'having a turn' in english I guess :/

April 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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I believe "up next" as a thing relates to people going "up" on stage for e.g. singing contests.

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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Well, "up" is an adjective, and "up next" is ... wracks brains an adjectival phrase? Something like that.

Actually, just "you're next" is pretty much using "next" as an adjective for "having a turn" :)

December 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithS.1

In a similar question (Sie sind dran), my answer of "They are next" was accepted as correct.

February 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Thanks for that report; I've removed that option now.

February 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/indymcfly

I'm a little confused about the word order here. I assume dran is at the end because it's a second verb, and the "sein" verb is already in 2nd position. But why not "Du bist noch dran nicht?"

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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dran is not a verb -- it's a contraction of daran, which is sort of a form of an es or an das; perhaps related to an der Reihe.

dran sein is an idiom indicating that it is one's turn, e.g. ich bin dran "it's my turn" or gestern warst du dran "it was your turn yesterday".

nicht (and by extension, noch nicht) comes before this dran to negate it: "not your turn, not your turn yet".

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kaja.olgi

If you use 'still' (rather than 'yet') in translating this sentence to english it may have more sence to you. 'It is still not your turn' option has more similar word order like the german version. Problem is because you always put 'yet' at the end of the sentence in english.

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/wibbleypants

One can say it is not yet his turn.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ferno9107
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Why are you learning German? Just use the TARDIS' universal translator. :)

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nita355185

I dont understand this sentence

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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It's for an action where people take turns -- for example, imagine children taking turns to go down a slide on a playground.

First Alice goes down the slide, then Bob, then Carol, then David.

If Alice is on the slide right now and David wants to go next, then Bob might say to him, "It's not your turn yet". Because it will be Bob's turn next, and then Carol's turn, and only then will it be David's turn to go down the slide.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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Is there not some way to teach this before dropping us in the deep end? :o)

November 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Juliesunny
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Why it's Du bist?

March 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
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It is set phrases in both languages, and thus one cannot translate word by word. Essentially the German expression means: You are not still (at the place in line) [that it is your turn].

The part in the round brackets is summed up in the adverb dran, and the part in the square brackets is omitted since it is implied.

March 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CR87iu

Would this be an example of a contraction, and being idiomatic?

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaquinBadillo

Is there an specific order of adverbs in german we should know? Because I wrote it as "Du bist nicht noch dran" and it was wrong

October 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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You might want to simply learn noch nicht as a fixed unit meaning “not yet”.

October 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Zisei

"Es ist nicht du dran"

Can that also mean the same thing or the sentence construction is wrong on that one?

July 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No; your sentence does not mean anything.

July 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/The_iCONer
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"It is not you up [sic]."

August 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluewaterh

At first it sounded wrong to me, because the sentence structure seemed weird, but while thinking of it, you could say this. It would sound better if you say "Es bist nicht du dran", but for me, it sounds a little rude, idk how other Germans feel about that. But i think the main mistake was, that you didn't use "yet". :)

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SpiritedDrifter
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Anyone else having trouble with this? I typed in the three ways that DuoLingo says is " correct ", but each time I do that it says it is incorrect and then precedes to show me another " correct " way. I even took screenshots to ensure that I am not crazy. I am going to send this to them. This is one of the main reasons why I have been moving away from DuoLingo and back to my other language softwares.

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Are you trying to submit multiple translations at once?

Duolingo may show you multiple possible solutions, but the idea is that they are alternatives -- you can type EITHER the first one OR the second one. But don't type in both, one after the other, as a single answer.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnCoruna

Which other apps?

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/VictoriaJoy95
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Why is "du bist" when is "es ist"

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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du bist ("you are") is the verb form for du ("you", when speaking to one person) -- es ist (it is) is the verb form for es ("it").

The use of du bist in this sentence comes because German speaks about taking turns differently from English.

It may help to think of a line of people queuing up at (say) a playground slide. Once the line has moved enough that you are at the top of the ladder, an English speaker will say that "it's my turn" while a German speaker will say that ich bin dran -- literally, "I am at-it". A bit like saying "I am at the front of the line", perhaps.

And in Duo's sentence, to express that "it's not your turn yet", you would say in German that "you are not 'at the front of the line' yet", du bist noch nicht dran -- with the verb for "you are" rather than "it is".

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Christo-fur

What does noch mean?

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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In this sentence, you have noch nicht, which together means "not yet".

On its own, noch can mean "still"; noch ein is "another one"; noch mehr is "more" (using "still more" or "yet more" would sound odd to me in English) -- best to learn the combinations as you usually can't translate one word at a time.

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelina321270

My teacher in school said - Swedish and German is the same. Then i saw this sentence and i understand it´s not, everything is backwards :(

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyGMT
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I am sure we sometimes say: 'You are up next' as in 'it is your turn'. Hence, think of it as 'You are not up next' (I am). Say in the doctors waiting room, or playing cards, one might ask: who is up next?

Took me a few times to get the word order right. The discussion helps me learn and remember a lot better. Duo is great, keeps it interesting by throwing in a quirky question.

December 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tanyabindra

Is "Du bist nicht dran noch" acceptable? Could you help clarify the placement of "noch" in different sentences?

November 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Is "Du bist nicht dran noch" acceptable?

No. noch nicht has to stay together in the sense of "not yet".

November 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Edo569180

Literaly should be " You are not on turn yet"

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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More like You're not "it" yet.

That's to say, Du bist dran is a fairly direct translation of the English schoolchild's "You're it" when playing a game of "tag".

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen83116

Why is this not "Es ist noch nicht dran?"

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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That would be "It's not its turn yet" -- the person who is at the front of the line, whose turn it is, who gets to do whatever it is would be es "it".

But this sentence is about saying that "you" are the person who gets to go now -- du bist noch nicht dran.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Erik226858

"Du bist nicht dran doch", would be incorrect?

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Assuming that doch is a typo for noch: please see my response to tanyabindra who asked the same question.

January 3, 2019
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