1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Czech
  4. >
  5. "Snažila se, ale neúspěšně."

"Snažila se, ale neúspěšně."

Translation:She tried, but unsuccessfully.

March 31, 2018

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Quick question. I (usually) remember to use the čárka when "u"is the first letter in a word, but here I changed it to a kroužek since it's no longer the first letter -- and I got "typo" for that. So... if the original word has a čárka, it keeps the čárka even if the position of the letter changes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Exctly, you keep čárka even if you put a prefix in front of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

A good example of this "phenomenon" is the word "trojúhelník" (triangle). It's combined (just like triangle) from tři (three) and úhel (angle). The úhel part keeps its ú (with a čárka) even though it no longer appears at the beginning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venik212

Does the Czech version sound (to Czech speakers) as if something is missing from it, as the English version does? In English a more natural sentence would be something like: She tried but was unsuccessful. Obviously, I can't tell just how natural the Czech sentence is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

It would be missing, if there was a lone adjective. But there isn't. There is an adveb (unsuccesfully/neúspěšně). It clearly refers to the preceding verb. I do not think there is anything missing in either language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

I (native AmE) agree with VladaFu that the English translation is fine. Your suggested sentence is fine, too, but not as a translation for the Czech sentence here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

I agree with venic212. For me ( also English speaker) She tried unsuccessfully makes more sense. Or as previously said she tried but was unsuccessful. I read widely... a lot different books and I have never come across such a statement. I would never say not even colouquially.

Learn Czech in just 5 minutes a day. For free.