"Cette cafetière n'a pas d'eau."

Translation:This coffee maker does not have water.

March 31, 2018

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selbosh

In UK English, we use cafetière to refer to what others might call a French press or coffee plunger (cafetière à piston), which was, fittingly, actually invented by an Italian.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_press

March 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1812

As you know, a French press is "une cafetière à piston". But "une cafetière" is just a coffee maker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Actually, those have become very rare in French households and the market is 2 fold: electric coffee machines cafetière électrique and Nespresso-type machines (capsules).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clrtnb

Do the French often use "instant coffee" at home? As a child in Vancouver Canada long ago, I remember coffee preparation as rather an arcane ritual involving a complicated piece of equipment; my parents soon switched to instant coffee.

Myself, I generally drink coffee out; for rare home preparation, I have a jar of instant in the frig.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

For coffee lovers, "le café instantané" is not real coffee and tastes bad. New machines, especially expresso machines have become a huge market and the preparation is even simpler than instant coffee because you don't need to use a kettle to heat water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/renee.hanl

A lot of my fellow Canadians call what you're taking about a bodum. But Ive heard it called a French Press as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1812

"Bodum" is a brand name; the company makes French presses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry_Porter

"There's no water in this coffee maker" would be more usual. English does not tend to personify coffee makers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Sure, but you have to stick to the construction of the original sentence.

There's no water in this coffee maker = Il n'y a pas d'eau dans cette cafetière.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H.E.P.

Why do you have to stick to the (unnatural) construction? We'd say 'it does not have any water in it' anyway


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeJeal

I certainly would say "it doesn't have any water" and I think the French wording would be the same for that; "il n'a pas d'eau".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter979234

I flagged up the pronunciation here - sounded like "cas-pierre"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetBerry2

The coffee maker is out of water

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