"Voulez-vous du café ou le dessert ?"

Translation:Do you want coffee or the dessert?

April 1, 2018

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/le-petit-singe

To me "the dessert" implies there is only one dessert available.

For example one might say: "do you want [some] coffee or the chocolate cake?" but otherwise it would be "do you want [some] coffee or [a] dessert?"

April 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007

I agree, I put Do you want coffee or dessert?

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Selbosh

In UK English, "pudding" is a synonym for "dessert".

"What's for pudding?"

"Do you want coffee or the pudding?"

April 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

"Le dessert" can be fruit or thousands of other nice things.

April 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Selbosh

So can pudding. That's my point! One of the definitions is literally "dessert", regardless of what type of dessert it is.

See definition #3 here:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/pudding

April 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/spielzebub

This is true - English people use "pudding" in any situation Americans would use "dessert". The idea of "pudding" specifically meaning mousse or custard isn't a thing here.

April 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Mega-Slowking

Why is it du café but le dessert?

March 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

"Du café" is "some coffee", as usual.
The "dessert" must be specific, otherwise, you could say "un dessert" (up to you to choose it).

April 1, 2019
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