"Une oie, une poule et un canard vivent ensemble."

Translation:A goose, a hen and a duck live together.

April 1, 2018

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DonOwens1

Nobody has yet suggested a reason for chicken not being accepted as well as hen.

September 23, 2018

[deactivated user]

    Why do we sometimes say hen instead of chicken? Because hen is more specific than chicken and we sometimes need to be specific about the type of chicken we are talking about. As this is a language learning site, it seems a safe bet that Duolingo wants students to understand the difference between le poulet, le coq and la poule.

    September 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/anais67mb

    Perfect explanation - Merci!

    September 27, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/betsys2003

    Literally nobody I know would say "a hen". In America, "a chicken" may officially refer to either the male or female, but it means the female. Hen sounds very British to me.

    Like, I would find it not odd at all for someone to say they had "some chickens and a rooster." And I would be surprised if someone said they had "a chicken" and then a rooster appeared.

    December 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

    Americans dont say "hen"? You and I live in two different Americas. I think you live in the one where they get milk from bulls.

    March 29, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/frankie100828

    A goose a chicken and a duck are living together this should b accepted

    November 13, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/SnarfSnarf123

    Chicken is masculine but hen is feminine. I'm sure French was deliberately designed to be confusing!

    November 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/JohannaRhode

    But all hens are female (they are capable of laying eggs). Chickens is a more generic term, so it defaults to masculine.

    January 30, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/SnarfSnarf123

    I don't agree - I would say a chicken was the female bird and a cockerel was the male bird. And hen is the same as a chicken. If I go to Tesco and pick up a roast chicken it won't be a cockerel.

    March 13, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Larry_Porter

    I've never heard anyone (here in the U.S.) use the word "cockerel." Here, it's "rooster" "(le coq" in French).

    March 13, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

    English is equally confusing with hens, cocks, roosters and chicks all being chickens.

    February 22, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Corey423192

    What's the punchline?

    December 27, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/hegr
    • 491

    Hey, I'm not judging.

    February 13, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Peter435682

    I'm judging.

    February 28, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Larry_Porter

    The [deactivated user] has an excellent explanation. Sorry to lose that person.

    February 28, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/ClareAlexa3

    Why hen not chicken?

    December 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
    Mod
    • 1658

    Because "une poule" is specifically a "hen", not just "un poulet" which is a general term for "a chicken".

    December 26, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/SnarfSnarf123

    What's the difference between a hen and a chicken?

    December 26, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Peter435682

    Could/should we pronounce the T in vivent?

    December 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnyDigit

    One would think that in the context of this exercise, they would have anticipated someone using "drake" for "canard".

    I live in a bilingual community and once saw someone mocked for asking about "oeufs de canard", rather than "oeufs de canne". It would seem that "canard" is very clearly perceived as male, when gender counts, and in English, when gender counts, a male duck is a "drake"

    April 26, 2019
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