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"Mañana habrá más comida."

Translation:Tomorrow there will be more food.

1
4 years ago

95 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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...si ustedes me dan su voto en esta elección.

144
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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¡Habrá promociones y grandes sorpresas tambien!

38
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sutyum

Now Duo is making me real sad. I imagined a mother saying this to her child.

100
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manuelsg02

You weren't the only one :(

24
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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Almost sounds like it could be a dual-edged proverb--expressing hope and delusion in the same sentence.

23
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benny
benny
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Ah, communism :-)

15
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsoodmand

Can you say, "Mañana va a estar más comida?" or is this an awkward sentence?

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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No, it's wrong to use «estar» here. We usually say «mañana va a haber más comida».

44
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

"Mañana va a estar..."

I can see where you are trying to go with this. This is a great opportunity for an important lesson in "haber" that often trips me up.

So, an important use of "haber" is to express an impersonal "to be". The examples you should be familiar with by now use "hay" (there is, there are). "No hay azúcar" (there is no sugar), "no hay gente", (there are no people), and so on. The problem with your sentence is that it does not correctly express your intended meaning, "Tomorrow there is going to be..." because the "there is" part, while correct, is not properly expressed by "mañana va a", which actually means, "tomorrow is going to". The impersonal "there is" construction you are looking for is lost and replaced by "mañana" as the subject.

This is where the specialized use of "haber" comes in. Remember those "hay" examples above? Well, "mañana hay" would be "tomorrow there is". Now you just have to conjugate to the third person future tense to get "habrá" and Bob's your uncle: "mañana habrá" (tomorrow there will be). Changing this to the simple "going to" form of future tense gives you Alexxis's example, "mañana va a haber" (tomorrow there is going to be).

The key is to realize that "mañana" is not the subject in the fragment, "tomorrow there is going to be", and therefore "mañana va a estar" won't work. You need an impersonal form of "to be" to handle the "there is" part, and that just happens to be one of the very important usages of "haber". Think hard on all that and it should all fall into place.

37
Reply51 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You cannot say it and have it make sense, because the subject of your phrase is changed to mañana. You have essentially changed the meaning to "Tomorrow will be (not always) more food"; as in the days are (temporarily) edible.

So not so much awkward as it is insane?

24
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carmencarrionm

I am agree, but "Hay, Habrá, Hubo,..." is an impersonal verb, and there is not subject.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PansyStone

You don't have to say "I am agree" just "I agree"

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Just to clarify the essential issue here, haber is the only correct way to express There is, there are, there was, there were, There will be, there could be, etc. With these expressions you take the third person singular (even if we use the plural) of the appropriate tense of haber.

There is salt on the table. Hay sal en la mesa. There was no work available. No había trabajo disponible. There has been more rain. Ha habido más lluvia (uses both purposes of haber) etc. Neither ser nor estar are appropriate here.

10
Reply21 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BackLikeBesaw

Muchos gracias por la ayuda.

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Muchas gracias

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Georgur
Georgur
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That's really awkward! Don't say that.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfred-00

Akward :(

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaudiaSan919043

Awkward

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenthe81
Lenthe81
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What about 'sera' for will be?

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alleigh25
alleigh25
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That's the future tense of "ser," which is used more as a state of being, like "I am from Spain" would be "Soy de españa."

"Haber" here means "there is/are," not just "to be." With this usage, it only exists in 3rd person (singular or plural), both conjugated as "hay" in the present tense. "Habrá" is the future tense of "hay," so instead of "there is," it means "there will be."

25
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

> What about 'sera' for will be?

"Mañana será" means "tomorrow will be". You need "tomorrow, there will be". "Haber" is used for this sort of impersonal form of "to be".

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angelMatem

Yes, but not in this case.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartaVanessa

When I click on 'conjugate' for the new word hater, 'habra' is not listed at all. Can someone help me understand where 'habra' fits in?

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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Here's the conjugation of haber: http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/COURSES/verbs/haber.HTM.

13
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dickvanriel
Dickvanriel
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Another link, cause the one above doesn't work for me. http://www.esfacil.eu/nl/werkwoorden/vervoeging/107-haber.html

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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Thank you. The first one didn't work for me, either. Dutch?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Imbricated

Could "tomorrow he will have more food" be acceptable?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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"Tomorrow he will have more food" = "Mañana tendrá más comida"

Remember that there are two basic kinds of "have" in Spanish; "haber" (perfect tense) and "tener" (possession).

32
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Nope. ;) Habra' is impersonal for 'there will be' and there is no mention of possession (tener) in the sentence, nor any mention of a 'he'

19
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeBradle4

That's what I wrote, but it was wrong. "Tomorrow" seems to be the subject of the sentence.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Tomorrow is not the subject; "habrá" means "there will be".

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chistesen

That would be: 'El tendr'a m'as comida ma~nana' which is specifically talking about a person whereas 'haber' indicates a situation, something more general.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-LiamAnderson-
-LiamAnderson-
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Haber is da verb. Use it for the perfect tense. And to say what there is/was/will be. Unique.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Mermelada ayer, mermelada mañana.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmaclb

... 'more to eat' wasn't accepted

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"To eat" is "comer"

"Comida" is "food"

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james232

"tomorrow there's more food" is probably a more usual expression in British English

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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So you use the present tense with tomorrow? You could say "Tomorrow there'll be more food."

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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We used the present for tomorrow in the US, too.

Tomorrow I'm going to LA.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carl710
carl710
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Why not "tomorrow will be more food"?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djusen
djusen
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Tomorrow is not a food. You need another subject (there) for the verb.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MsMoneyCPA

How am I supposed to know the difference between 1st & 3rd person?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alleigh25
alleigh25
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First person is habré, third is habrá. But even if they were the same, it should be obvious from context ("Tomorrow there will be more food" makes sense; "Tomorrow I will be more food" does not).

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elainey022

Can anyone tell me why this can't be translated "Tomorrow you (or he, she, it) will have more food". Thanks so much

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djusen
djusen
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Use tener for possession.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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hay = "there is" or "there are"

habrá = "there will be"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lianet491526

(Comer es un verbo) comer is a verb but there are other words that came from this one like:

Comiendo

Comi

Comere

Comelon

Comimos

Comieron

In spanish the verbs are in most of the sentences.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Yes, but "comida" is the noun for "food" and the verb in this sentence is "habrá" meaning "there will be".

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/osogr1s

Why not "tomorrow he will have more food"?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"Tener" is the verb used to mean "have" for possession, so that would be "Mañana tendrá más comida." or more specifically "Mañana él tendrá más comida." Scroll up for more information about "habrá".

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

There is no "él" in the sentence. They are teaching us "haber" and that is the word you skipped.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam842909
Sam842909
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Could mañana also mean morning? So the translation might be; "there will be more food in the morning." Or would i then have to say Mañana en la mañana? Or is the time of day implied by the context of the rest of the conversation? Just curious, any feedback is good. Thanks:)

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PepiEspo0

mañana = tomorrow A la mañana: In the morning En la mañana: in the morning ( until noon )

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

I would like to know this too. The phrase you used is within spanishdict's translations. Wonder if you can just use "la" or "el" to clarify. I find this so confusing.

For those that like links: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/manana

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonjackson1

"Habra" does not show up in the conjugations of HABRA.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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Wow. That's a lot to remember.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Perhaps you would like this link which focuses on the impersonal forms only: http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/COURSES/verbs/haber.HTM

0
Reply1 year ago